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Old 03-28-2010, 08:34 PM
ZSP
 
Location: El Paso TX
1,568 posts, read 4,163,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by little elmer View Post
When he's acting like that, lay him down and hold him there - if he gets aggressive and tries to bite you, then you've found the area of disrespect. Hold him there until he gives up, letting him know that's what you want from him.
I've never been a fan of the alpha roll or using force in disciplining my dogs. I prefer positive reinforcement after a no nonsense correction. JMHO

Snapping/biting is not acceptable behavior and I know there are lots of threads with great advice here. Maybe a time out is called for.
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:44 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,352 posts, read 16,793,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZSP View Post
I've never been a fan of the alpha roll or using force in disciplining my dogs. I prefer positive reinforcement after a no nonsense correction. JMHO

Snapping/biting is not acceptable behavior and I know there are lots of threads with great advice here. Maybe a time out is called for.
^^ yes......

also, i happened to think ..... his age is roughly equivalent to a teenaged boy ..... he may be going through that obnoxious rebellious stage that teenagers do....
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Old 03-29-2010, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,328,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasGirl@Heart View Post
I have a yorkie/maltese mix--only 11 months old. He is a very friendly dog, but this past week, he started snapping at me. If I am not paying 100% of my attention towards him, like now for instance--I'm on the computer. If I put my hand down to pet him, he snaps at me.

How do I STOP this behavior? I just put him in his kenneled area for now--but not sure if that is the right thing to do...PLEASE, only constructive feed back and solutions, not brow beating or throat slashing replies. I hesitated to post here because of past brow beatings.
Throat slashing would definitely work but I suspect you are not looking for that permanent of a solution.

My sister had success with her chihuahua by saying "NO" and completely ignoring the dog for a while after any display of poor behavior and until the dog has abandoned any begging or pleading (a time-out doesn't really mean much to a dog but your ignoring him will; I'm sure this is what other people here mean when they say "time-out", but it isn't like putting a kindergartner in time-out to think about what he's done). This takes a long time, total consistency and a lot of patience but it will work. Not too much at once, just focus on the snapping at first. After the dog has learned that being snappy results in his virtual disappearance, that can be applied to other undesirable behaviors.

You may also need to let the dog fend for himself a little bit. I don't know anything about your routines with this little guy, but if being carried, coddled and snuggled is the norm in his daily existence you may want to try letting him be a dog a little more. He needs to use his own feet, walk on a leash and have interaction with other people and other dogs. Don't rescue him if he gets uncomfortable in the presence of well-behaved big dogs, especially if he's soliciting a "pick-up" by jumping up on your leg. Let him figure out on his own that he isn't going to die when someone or something bigger than him wants a sniff.
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Old 03-29-2010, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh--Home of the 6 time Super Bowl Champions!
11,309 posts, read 11,167,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by little elmer View Post
When he's acting like that, lay him down and hold him there - if he gets aggressive and tries to bite you, then you've found the area of disrespect. Hold him there until he gives up, letting him know that's what you want from him.
Actually I tried this yesterday and it worked!! No snapping so far today!
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post

My sister had success with her chihuahua by saying "NO" and completely ignoring the dog for a while after any display of poor behavior and until the dog has abandoned any begging or pleading (a time-out doesn't really mean much to a dog but your ignoring him will; I'm sure this is what other people here mean when they say "time-out", but it isn't like putting a kindergartner in time-out to think about what he's done). This takes a long time, total consistency and a lot of patience but it will work. Not too much at once, just focus on the snapping at first. After the dog has learned that being snappy results in his virtual disappearance, that can be applied to other undesirable behaviors.

You may also need to let the dog fend for himself a little bit. I don't know anything about your routines with this little guy, but if being carried, coddled and snuggled is the norm in his daily existence you may want to try letting him be a dog a little more. He needs to use his own feet, walk on a leash and have interaction with other people and other dogs. Don't rescue him if he gets uncomfortable in the presence of well-behaved big dogs, especially if he's soliciting a "pick-up" by jumping up on your leg. Let him figure out on his own that he isn't going to die when someone or something bigger than him wants a sniff.
I think ignoring him is what is causing him to snap at me. IE: He is being ignored when I'm on the phone or on my computer.

He does get cuddled and snuggled a lot by me. But he does walk on a leash and run around the house as well. I take him to the park about 3 times a week where he has interaction with others as well as dogs. He LOVES the Burnese Mountain Dog next door, sits and waits for him to come outside to play.
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Old 03-29-2010, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh--Home of the 6 time Super Bowl Champions!
11,309 posts, read 11,167,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringo1 View Post
Practice Nothing in Life is Free - it's a very kind way of asserting yourself as the one in charge (or the pack leader so to speak.). It's all about having the dog sit before he goes out; sit before he gets his food. . . . little signs of respect like that. Google NILF and you will find the specific guidelines for how to . . well, really live this way. I love it. It's just mainly a gentle reinforcement of who is the boss on a daily, mannerly, basis.
I started doing this as well yesterday--seems to be working.
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Old 03-29-2010, 10:48 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
29,819 posts, read 16,517,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasGirl@Heart View Post
I started doing this as well yesterday--seems to be working.

Glad it's working. A gentle reminder of who is in charge. I use it with my stubborn, strong-willed, Westie.
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Old 03-29-2010, 10:52 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,352 posts, read 16,793,130 times
Reputation: 11458
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
Throat slashing would definitely work but I suspect you are not looking for that permanent of a solution.

My sister had success with her chihuahua by saying "NO" and completely ignoring the dog for a while after any display of poor behavior and until the dog has abandoned any begging or pleading (a time-out doesn't really mean much to a dog but your ignoring him will; I'm sure this is what other people here mean when they say "time-out", but it isn't like putting a kindergartner in time-out to think about what he's done). This takes a long time, total consistency and a lot of patience but it will work. Not too much at once, just focus on the snapping at first. After the dog has learned that being snappy results in his virtual disappearance, that can be applied to other undesirable behaviors.

You may also need to let the dog fend for himself a little bit. I don't know anything about your routines with this little guy, but if being carried, coddled and snuggled is the norm in his daily existence you may want to try letting him be a dog a little more. He needs to use his own feet, walk on a leash and have interaction with other people and other dogs. Don't rescue him if he gets uncomfortable in the presence of well-behaved big dogs, especially if he's soliciting a "pick-up" by jumping up on your leg. Let him figure out on his own that he isn't going to die when someone or something bigger than him wants a sniff.
this has worked VERY well for bailey..... she can NOT stand it when she knows i am upset with her and completely ignore her.... no talking, no petting, no eye contact, NOTHING..... its hard on both of us ..... but after about 10-15 minutes, timeout is up and things go back to normal.....

she is basically a REALLY good dog, so i have only had to do it a few times when she was younger.... but i'll tell you what..... she NEVER repeated whatever the behavior was that got her in trouble......
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Old 04-01-2010, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Florida
741 posts, read 1,384,747 times
Reputation: 1168
I had a Papillon that could be snappy. He was about a year old when he started that. I did the dominance thing of Pinning his muzzle to the floor. He didn't get the message.
He would want to sit on my lap and when I shifted his position he would growl.
He never learned that when he did that he would get dumped on the floor.
I had at the time 3 Belgian Sheps. He never gave them any of his sass.
They mostly ignored him. He totally loved my dominant male, and would run along side of him snatching at his fur as they ran. --ignored like he wasn't there.
He lived to be 17, but his personality never changed.
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Old 04-05-2010, 04:15 PM
 
293 posts, read 886,413 times
Reputation: 162
Good training, ONLY positive is good, but mostly getting lots of walks. They don't have to be long walks with a little one. Just releasing all of that energy. A dog that gets exercise and lots of play with owners is a happy dog. Doing little tricks for everything is wonderful. They LOVE to learn. Dance, lie down, sit, come, etc. Great for the bond with owners and wonderful to make them think and be active instead of lie around all day.
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