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Old 06-07-2007, 05:51 AM
 
13,773 posts, read 33,903,439 times
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I am adopting an 8 mo. old weimaraner who was turned in to the SPCA by the owner of a puppy mill. She is very scared since all she has ever known is a cage and yelling and kicking of her pen from the owner or so I was told by the SPCA. They were going to have to put her down if I didn't take her. Of course, I couldn't let that happen...I drove 2 hours to the SPCA make sure she would get a chance.
She is a beautiful BIG girl but want to make her transition as smooth as possible.
They said she gets along well with other dogs and ignores the cats, that is the good news. She seems to be more comfortable in a kennel so I need some ideas on how to transition her to be part of my family.
Anyone here had to deal with a puppy treated badly.
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Old 06-07-2007, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,886 posts, read 25,316,043 times
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I've been through this. The good news is it can be done. It will take a lot of patience and love. Let her be crate trained. Give her a kennel in a quiet area. Take her out to potty and give her lots of affection and treats. It may be quite a while till she will even take the treats. Let her spend most of her time in the kennel for a few days. Then start leaving her kennel door open for a few minutes after you take her out to potty. Let her decide to leave the kennel and come to you. Reward her and love her. Spend a little time sitting outside her kennel every day just talking to her. Over time, she will become interested in you and the family. Her fear level will go down and you will start to see her personality. Everything new will frighten her for a while and nothing will be easy. You just have to take it slow and be very patient.
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Old 06-07-2007, 07:34 AM
 
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My jazzy (a 3 year old akita/malamute mix) was abused as a puppy. my dh and i adopted her when she was a year old. she was extremely shy and scared because she was left outside her first year and was severely punished if she even came near her old house. both of our dogs are indoor dogs. to jazzy everything INSIDE the house was new and scary. this past weekend was the first weekend she allowed us to turn on our ceiling fan (two years after adopting her she was still afraid of it). to this day extremely loud noises scare or if i accidentially drop something on the floor she bolts.

As yellowsnow (btw I LOVE that), patience and love and positive reinforcement is what your baby needs right now. Reward her constantly for doing positive things even simple things like coming out of her kennel all by herself, praise her for it. also try to always speak in a calming voice. love and patience is what she needs. it could take months but she'll come around. I know my Jazzy did. good luck
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Old 06-20-2009, 09:50 AM
 
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Default puppys from mills

i have a weimeraner that i just adopted from a puppy mill she is well overbreed and is so scared of everything our biggist problem is that she feels like she cannot use the bathroom we get her to go out side and she is scared i just dont know how to help her she is such a sweet girl but frightened of everything please help
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Old 06-20-2009, 10:38 AM
 
7,079 posts, read 34,523,205 times
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You need to be more patient. Give her LOTS of time. She's terrified. Terrified of people (who've done nothing but harm her up to now), terrified of noises and places.

Give her time. And give her space. Don't get into her face. Let her progress at her own pace. It might take a long time (months) but she WILL come around. Patience, Grasshopper!
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Old 06-21-2009, 01:15 AM
 
1,688 posts, read 6,910,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeper View Post
She seems to be more comfortable in a kennel so I need some ideas on how to transition her to be part of my family.
Bearing in mind all the normal, household sights and sounds a dog like this would not be used to (indeed, to even being indoors), Miss Weimie has her work cut out for her. As do you.

Just to be clear - I'm interpreting your use of the word kennel to mean some sort of outside-only accommodation.

I'd start the transition with a crate in her kennel - allowing her to go in and out at her whim and placing her food in the crate. At the same time I'd be bringing her into the house for short (very short) periods of time - perhaps one area or one room - during which the house is quiet, no fuss, no noise - just a wander to have a sniff. When she's more comfortable with being in house, I'd progress by putting the positively-associated crate (which already smells as it should) with her in it somewhere where she can watch what is going on, but not too close so as to be disturbed or unnerved by it. I'd half cover the crate (back half) with something to give her a darkened hidy-hole into which she can retreat. You'll have to gauge how long is "long enough" for her before she needs to be relieved of stress by being taken back to her kennel. It will vary considerably with each individual dog.

It should all be a gradual progression from outside to outside with a bit of inside to outside and more time inside, to mainly inside with a bit of outside to... whatever way it is that the other animals in your house live.

I've had many dogs that had never set foot in a house before through my doors - some abused, some not. Some take to it easily, others don't. We have to remember that every single little thing is new and unknown to them - the sound of the washing machine, a toilet flushing, the fridge accidentally slamming shut and the jars rattle... I've always found it helpful to allow them to be somewhere where they can observe from a safe distance. I also found it tremendously helpful if there are other animals interacting in the "scene".

Be careful not to overwhelm her even out of the best of intentions. Let her set the pace of progress and be ready for set-backs, because they will happen. As callous as it sounds, you need to bear in mind that direct attention will be scary for her. Keep it low-key until she seeks more.

Her young age is on both your sides.

Let us know how she gets on.
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Old 06-21-2009, 05:44 AM
 
4,130 posts, read 13,307,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeper View Post
I am adopting an 8 mo. old weimaraner who was turned in to the SPCA by the owner of a puppy mill. She is very scared since all she has ever known is a cage and yelling and kicking of her pen from the owner or so I was told by the SPCA. They were going to have to put her down if I didn't take her. Of course, I couldn't let that happen...I drove 2 hours to the SPCA make sure she would get a chance.
She is a beautiful BIG girl but want to make her transition as smooth as possible.
They said she gets along well with other dogs and ignores the cats, that is the good news. She seems to be more comfortable in a kennel so I need some ideas on how to transition her to be part of my family.
Anyone here had to deal with a puppy treated badly.
I must have missed this, how is she doing now? Saw her photo and it looks like she's getting along well w/ your other 2.

For anyone w/ a newly adopted dog who may have come from not a great bkground (puppymill or otherwise), would just suggest going underneath a bit to pet them rather than reaching over their heads (which might be perceived as threatening to them). Even something as innocent as petting a small dog who's being held could make them a bit defensive if they don't know you (and that would pertain to any dog from any background, they c/b insecure for whatever reason etc, maybe their surroundings that day, not feeling well etc, you don't want them to snap at you). Just a couple of thoughts -
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Old 06-21-2009, 07:25 AM
 
7,079 posts, read 34,523,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Honeycrisp View Post
For anyone w/ a newly adopted dog who may have come from not a great bkground (puppymill or otherwise), would just suggest going underneath a bit to pet them rather than reaching over their heads (which might be perceived as threatening to them). Even something as innocent as petting a small dog who's being held could make them a bit defensive if they don't know you (and that would pertain to any dog from any background, they c/b insecure for whatever reason etc, maybe their surroundings that day, not feeling well etc, you don't want them to snap at you).
An EXCELLENT point. Actually MOST dogs, maltreated or not, do NOT like being touched on the head! They get used to often, or, like my pug, never do, but prefer to be approached from below!

See Turid Rugaas' EXCELLENT Calming Signals site! Turid Rugaas - Calming Signals Community
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Old 06-22-2009, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,395,048 times
Reputation: 7084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeper View Post
I am adopting an 8 mo. old weimaraner who was turned in to the SPCA by the owner of a puppy mill. She is very scared since all she has ever known is a cage and yelling and kicking of her pen from the owner or so I was told by the SPCA. They were going to have to put her down if I didn't take her. Of course, I couldn't let that happen...I drove 2 hours to the SPCA make sure she would get a chance.
She is a beautiful BIG girl but want to make her transition as smooth as possible.
They said she gets along well with other dogs and ignores the cats, that is the good news. She seems to be more comfortable in a kennel so I need some ideas on how to transition her to be part of my family.
Anyone here had to deal with a puppy treated badly.
You have a difficult balancing act to execute. You can't make this into a pity-party, but you can't force the dog to do anything or introduce the dog to anything traumatic.

Your introduction needs to be extremely low-key. If you can get the dog worn out with a jog or a long walk before she meets the family that is good. This may be tricky because a long walk may be a bit traumatic - you may have to get creative for some exercise beforehand. I think that high pitched "Ooooh! Hi! Come here! It's ok!" is exactly wrong for the first intro in this case. Have everyone ignore the dog, let her investigate the scene at her own pace. If she starts getting excited and boisterous, intensify your ignoring. Curious but cautious sniffing is good. Make sure you have a large supply of sought-after treats at the ready and administer whenever the dog is looking mellow and un-afraid. You only get one chance at a first intro. This is important because you are telling the dog exactly what is expected of her and exactly how she should act. If you reward or stimulate anything other than exactly what you want, you get something other than exactly what you want (obviously) and it will never be easier to set the rules.

Good luck, you have a good soul.

EDIT: Nevermind - I just saw that this thread is 2 years old.

How about an update?
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