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Old 04-18-2010, 07:52 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,355 posts, read 16,830,667 times
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both of my mutts are great with kids..... just yesterday at the park, a little girl about 3 or 4 or so jumped off her bike and ran directly over to us..... her mom just watched..... and grinned when i told her, yes, she can pet the dogs..... .... thank goodness they ARE as kid friendly as they are...... the little one was hugging all over dave's body and petting (read whacking) bailey all up and down her back.....
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Old 04-18-2010, 09:45 AM
 
Location: San Diego
5,027 posts, read 13,410,022 times
Reputation: 4848
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishFamily2010 View Post
We recently took in an (English) Bulldog and had to return him to the breeder because the previous owner had basically ruined him.
Is this the same one you posted pictures of after you took him home, saying how wonderful he is with your kids? I recall you mentioning that his only issue was humping, but I haven't followed your posts after that. Sorry to hear it didn't work out!

I know all too well about horrible owners ruining dogs. If the dog is abused in the first few months of life, it can have some horrific issues to deal with later on.

You should have asked the breeder the exact reason why the previous owner gave him up. The only circumstance where I would consider an older bully would be if the previous family lost their home and couldn't keep him (happens so much in our area) or if it's a retired showdog. Anything else and you're asking for trouble. People don't just give Bulldogs up because of their cost. I'd be very weary of someone that did and it wasn't one of the two reasons I mentioned. A few of my friends go theirs that way and have the most wonderful dogs.
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Old 04-18-2010, 10:18 AM
 
45 posts, read 72,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAK802 View Post
Is this the same one you posted pictures of after you took him home, saying how wonderful he is with your kids? I recall you mentioning that his only issue was humping, but I haven't followed your posts after that. Sorry to hear it didn't work out!

I know all too well about horrible owners ruining dogs. If the dog is abused in the first few months of life, it can have some horrific issues to deal with later on.

You should have asked the breeder the exact reason why the previous owner gave him up. The only circumstance where I would consider an older bully would be if the previous family lost their home and couldn't keep him (happens so much in our area) or if it's a retired showdog. Anything else and you're asking for trouble. People don't just give Bulldogs up because of their cost. I'd be very weary of someone that did and it wasn't one of the two reasons I mentioned. A few of my friends go theirs that way and have the most wonderful dogs.
Yes - same dog. He was wonderful in the beginning. But right after I went on a hiatus from here he just became HORRIBLE. He became snappy with the girls as well as us. The previous owner had been a co-worker of the breeder and she thought he was alot different until we brought Chummy home and started seeing his issues. He had been crated and caged so much that he constantly walked, alot of times in circles. I can't remember the exact term for the syndrome, but I'm sure you all know what I'm talking about. It was just pitiful. The breeder knew a couple that work with "problem Bullies" and he is now living happily with them. All I can say is best of luck to them and him. We just got really afraid of him hurting the girls. There were several incidents of him getting ahold of our oldest daughter and pinning her down. The last straw was my husband became severely allergic to him and couldn't be in the same room as him without his eyes swelling together.

It's always best to start with a dog from a puppy, especially when kids are involved.
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Old 04-18-2010, 02:02 PM
 
2,520 posts, read 5,358,982 times
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My beloved Aussie was my dd's bodyguard from when she was 2 until 14. He was one of the best dogs I had.
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Old 04-18-2010, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Under the SUNNY WARM SUN ....
14,939 posts, read 10,226,419 times
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Goldens - no doubt.
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Old 04-18-2010, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,812 posts, read 16,651,567 times
Reputation: 3335
Our chihuahua is not good with kids, but the basset loves kids.
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Old 04-18-2010, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Islip Township
488 posts, read 745,383 times
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If size doesn't make a diff.
Nothing will protect and love your children like a GREAT DANE.
Also German Short haired Pointer
Yes I have both
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:38 PM
 
1,182 posts, read 2,541,382 times
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My German Shepherd Dog is fantastic with kids. He almost acts like a babysitter. If my seven year old gets too close to the street the dog will literally get between him and the street and try to herd him back into the yard.

He loves to play and never gets tired of chasing a ball. He is also very tolerant. My youngest climbs all over him. I don't think he likes it, but he has never even growled at any of the kids. When he gets tired of it, he just leaves.

The only thing that can be an issue is that he is very protective of the kids.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Lakewood, CO
86 posts, read 100,370 times
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My small nephews could take a fresh beef bone away from my rottweiler while he was chewing on it. A friend of mine had wolf hybrids, same thing. More important than the breed is the training. The dog has to understand his position in the family pack.


That being said, a decent breed helps. I always like a Landseer Newfoundland. You know, Nanna from Peter Pan. Of course they come with a lot of shedding and drooling.
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Old 04-29-2010, 09:05 PM
 
119 posts, read 373,988 times
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Newfs and Saints. Very, very gentle, and they adore kids. Our huge Newf is afraid of tiny dogs, like Chi's and Poms!
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