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Old 04-26-2010, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
7,556 posts, read 11,865,071 times
Reputation: 4516

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I'm sure we've all seen it before, but this was really irritating.

Not to stereotype an APBT, but it was a male who was aggressive to every other male there. The way it unfolded was we were the only owners there, with our male Brody, a Dogue de Bordeaux . Soon after, another couple showed with a female Heeler (great disposition, a lot of fun) and a male Pit.

"No problem if there is no problem" I thought, as I greeted both dogs and let the dogs do their thing. Our mastiff is social but laid back, and after walking around a bit, he's back under our chairs for a breather. But every time he would try to ramble around, the other male would cut him off and generally be a menace.

This went on for 15-20 minutes, and I thought I would walk to the other side of the park and give Brody some "breathing room". Brody followed me a good distance, but the Pit gave him the business all the way - and Brody finally stood his ground. I stood next to both dogs, thinking on the one hand that they needed to be separated for no good can come of it (the Pit has no off button), and on the other that Brody has 556 lbs of bite force and somebody has to tell this bully off.

They jumped up on hind legs and growled face to face, and the Pit had a good angle at Brody's neck, being shorter. Before they danced in earnest, I shot the Pit a "shhhh!!" and poked him in neck like his mother would, and he backed off - Brody wasn't in it whole heartedly anyway - and his owner led the Pit away.

Having faced off, they avoided each other as more owners and dogs showed up, but the Pit got into more fights with other dogs before being ushered out when the owners left. The whole park had a general scowl until he was gone.

No real question here, but is there time when you want to tell someone to go before you yourself leash your dog up and head for home?
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Old 04-26-2010, 11:23 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
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was the pit neutered?? i would think THAT would be more of an issue than the dog breed.....
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Old 04-26-2010, 11:29 AM
 
Location: East Valley, AZ
3,852 posts, read 8,256,132 times
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Weird, I had this EXACT same thing happen when I took Beesley to the dog park on Saturday.

There was a great group of dogs there, all getting along great, and an owner came in with his unneutered pit and all hell broke lose. This dog was attacking everyone and Beesley DID NOT like him at all. We left shortly after, because the owner wasn't doing anything about it. I know I wasn't the only one who was annoyed.

There are signs all around the dog park saying it's not a good idea to bring unneutered dogs in, and I generally have no problem with it. But, you need to actually WATCH your dog if you know they're aggressive. I'd probably say something if we weren't already about to leave.
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Old 04-26-2010, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
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It is sad the pit's owner is not more responsible and proactive if her dog tends to be aggressive. Once a dog has a fight or is acting aggressive it is time to leash the dog and leave as there are chemicals, hormones, etc., released that then stay in the brain for hours and it takes less to set the dog off again and again so if a dog is acting aggressive it is best to call it a day and remove it.

Jazz can get aggressive with unknown dogs so she no longer goes to off leash parks but in her younger days she had a huge pack of playmates at one park and was fine with all of them but sometimes a new dog would set her off and if I saw her getting aggressive I would call her leash her and we would leave.Owners with such dogs need to step up and not wait until others ask them to leave. There is a responsibility that comes with owning such a dog sadly owners often ignore that and feel it is just as much their right to be at the park with their dogs as it is for anyone else to be there.

Telling someone to take their dog out can be difficult as you never know the reaction you may get from them but it is either that or leave with your own dog if they do not have the common sense to leave on their own.


On the flip side I have seen the sweet pits that come to our park get blamed for an aggresive incident when they actually were not involved at all but happened to be near by.There was an incident once where this lady was walking around claiming the pit attacked her dog well I was there that day and it was her dog that attacked the pit who by the way growled but did not fight back.
Some people just can not accept the fact that their "sweet" dog could be to blame
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Old 04-26-2010, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by latetotheparty View Post
was the pit neutered?? i would think THAT would be more of an issue than the dog breed.....
Didn't think to ask, but then mine's not. All things being equal, his temperament was imbalanced and he made the other dogs nervous.
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Old 04-26-2010, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
7,556 posts, read 11,865,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashdog View Post
It is sad the pit's owner is not more responsible and proactive if her dog tends to be aggressive. Once a dog has a fight or is acting aggressive it is time to leash the dog and leave as there are chemicals, hormones, etc., released that then stay in the brain for hours and it takes less to set the dog off again and again so if a dog is acting aggressive it is best to call it a day and remove it.
That's something else to consider - Brody's never been in a fight (other than Saturday's brief encounter) in his 16 month old life - but now, what is his temperament going to be next time we arrive at the park? Especially if "knucklehead" is there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashdog View Post
On the flip side I have seen the sweet pits that come to our park get blamed for an aggresive incident when they actually were not involved at all but happened to be near by.There was an incident once where this lady was walking around claiming the pit attacked her dog well I was there that day and it was her dog that attacked the pit who by the way growled but did not fight back.
Some people just can not accept the fact that their "sweet" dog could be to blame
Absolutely - a dog is a dog just as a human's a human - there's no judgment before hand because you don't want to create uneasiness with animals that pick up on that sort of things. I personally like the terrier breed and though I've never had one, I would pride myself in having a balanced dog that was well liked.

This couple either didn't care or were off in their own little world.
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Old 04-26-2010, 01:42 PM
 
Location: San Diego
5,027 posts, read 13,373,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by little elmer View Post
That's something else to consider - Brody's never been in a fight (other than Saturday's brief encounter) in his 16 month old life - but now, what is his temperament going to be next time we arrive at the park? Especially if "knucklehead" is there?


Just keep your dog away from him, that's all you can do! My boy was pretty badly attacked by a husky last week. He was chasing his ball, and the husky came from the side at full speed, causing PC to roll a few times. I'm shocked neither of them was hurt, given the force of impact.

After regaining his composure and with the husky hovering over my short dog, PC went at him like I've never seen! Luckily, idiot owner came and pulled his dog away, who then got into a fight with a Lab there. This husky has gotten into a fight with just about every single dog at the park, yet the owner thinks he has a right to be there just like everyone else!

When I see him, I take my dog to the other side of the park, though there have been instances since the attack where the husky just follows and pecks my dog, to rile him up! The owner is worthless, so we try to avoid being there at the same time now. PC's temperament hasn't changed and he is totally fine with all the dogs at the park, but does get this weird look on his face and stiff body any time the husky comes near him, so we avoid him.
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Old 04-26-2010, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Cook County
5,288 posts, read 6,349,611 times
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I can't believe the stuff I see/read about at dog parks. In Charlotte we would frequent a dog park that was divided for little dogs on one side, large dogs on the other. We took our friends mini-shnauzers there...The smaller dog park was always pretty docile and the dogs seemed to get along well, but man, that large side there is always hell breaking loose. I feel bad for responsible owners that have well trained dogs that they have to deal with aggresive, larger dogs and their owners.
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Old 04-26-2010, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
7,556 posts, read 11,865,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orangeish View Post
I can't believe the stuff I see/read about at dog parks. In Charlotte we would frequent a dog park that was divided for little dogs on one side, large dogs on the other. We took our friends mini-shnauzers there...The smaller dog park was always pretty docile and the dogs seemed to get along well, but man, that large side there is always hell breaking loose. I feel bad for responsible owners that have well trained dogs that they have to deal with aggresive, larger dogs and their owners.
They are in separate yards, and I always thought that the little guys would be more anxious/high strung. I'm realizing that these guys really could care less about the size, and it's all about attitude.

Sounds like fodder for a bumper sticker.
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Old 04-26-2010, 09:06 PM
 
29 posts, read 115,774 times
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After a few hundred visits, I don't sweat the small stuff anymore. We usually go when it is busiest and most chaotic so it is inevitable there will be some bad apples. You deal with it and move on. My dogs are old pros at it now and hardly anything bothers them. Mine have never been formally trained and know only a few basic commands. But they are very street smart and it has served them well.
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