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Old 06-03-2010, 11:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flkingfan View Post
I adopted one of my girls from a shelter. When I went there to meet her she was fine. We adopted her the next day and took her home that day. Within a couple of days she showed symptoms of kennel cough. I took her to my own vet, but the shelter offered to give me the meds. Usually when I adopt they are pretty good with the age. As for health issues, I don't expect the shelter to know unless it's happening at that time.

I understand what your saying, however, the dog had kennel cough before she came home with my friend...they gave her meds, and the other morning, the dog was coughing so badly, it scared her so she took her to the vets...

I don't think they should allow these dogs to go home with kennel cough, now if the dog isn't showing any symptoms at the time, that's different...
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Old 06-03-2010, 11:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
My only complaints about our adoption experience (from a refuge that does fostering in homes, not a traditional shelter with a dedicated site) wasn't incomplete/erroneous information regarding age or health condition, it was incomplete/erroneous information regarding behavioral issues and training. We got a dog that was billed as crate trained that wasn't, was billed as leash trained that wasn't, and fairly extreme separation anxiety issues were selectively omitted as "things we might want to know."

I know that rescues, refuges, and shelters wanna get dogs adopted out, believe me, I know. But when will people learn that either passive or outright dishonesty doesn't help the animal (or their organization's rep, and therefore, the welfare of other animals in their care)? Another couple might have returned Willie after becoming aware of the issues that were both outright and passively concealed (and DID, in two cases before we finally adopted him, gee, wonder why? The foster led us to believe that it was a problem with the people in both cases, but I have my doubts), he wouldn't work in every household. This sort of potential upheaval could be prevented by being more straightforward with prospective adopters. You want a good home for the dogs you're placing, not people who end up feeling they've been sold a bill of goods, and/or end up not being able to keep an animal.
You are absolutely right, and the very reason we're all upset about this...we would have taken the dogs anyway, however, I don't want to be lied to...that is inexcusable...and will now prevent me from adopting a rescue again....this is the first rescue I've had...he is great with me...patient, loving, thankful, very very good dog....and I wouldn't trade him for the world...however, I was floored when I found out he was 10 years old...I was told he was 6...and that his shots were up to date...well, when I got him home, all his shots were due...and I paid $350.00 for him...

I love him emensely...he is my friend and companion....I so look forward to each and every day with him...but I'm always scared today might be the last day...we don't have much time together, and I vow, to make him happy...for whatever time he has left...that is why I walk him so much...he loves to be outside...he's fit and trim, I give him Taste of the Wild along with the Missing Link...which I'm hoping will help give him a longer life...but I've grown so attached to him...and I didn't have a dog for 13 years, b/c the last one I put down really tore me apart...I guess as you grow older, it just pierces the heart and soul more? anyway, thank you for understanding....

Creme
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Old 06-03-2010, 11:46 AM
 
26,309 posts, read 24,361,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skeet09 View Post
The shots situation is truly bothersome. I haven't had the pleasure of adopting a shelter dog or from a rescue group but that's not right!
Lots of vets will vary on the age of the dog from physical exam, teeth exam, etc. but usually by a year or two off, not by a couple of years.
Does the ad say he has his shots, then you showed up and he doesn't? I would print out the ad from the webpage. I think I'm going to do this myself when I look for a dog, just in case I show up and something else is said.
no, the add said, he had all his shots, I showed up and took him home, and asked for the vet reports to take to my vet, and he was due for his shots...

and yeah, they knew how old he was...when I got him home, I saw, his eyes were clouding, and when the vet examined him, he told me, you see that in older dogs...he looked at his teeth, told me they were professionally cleaned, and then said, he was probably 9 or 10 years old, they told me 6? And they advertised him as a 6 year old...sorry, but they knew it, and I should have questioned it, but I was smitten, when I saw him in person, and fell in love with him immediately...so, I didn't see anything else...Love is most certainly blind. And I would have taken him anyway...I mean that...I just don't like being lied to.
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Old 06-03-2010, 11:49 AM
 
26,309 posts, read 24,361,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Thankfully, all up-to-date shots, three months' worth of heartworm meds, and a collar, leash, and bowl were all included in the $150 adoption fees.

That is more then reasonable...I paid $350.00 and so did my friend...
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Old 06-03-2010, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,542,931 times
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I do a lot of volunteer work with a dog rescue. I've fostered numerous dogs. Everything is our best guess. We pull dogs from rural shelters where we know absolutely zero about their history. We guess their breed, guess their age, and hope that the public realizes they're educated guesses at best. Vets can't guess the age anymore than our dog-pros can. You look at the teeth, look for signs of aging, and estimate. My vet thinks my dog is 2. She's at least 5.

The shots situation is another story--that should have been sorted out.

Unfortunately, there are good rescues and bad rescues. There are a couple in my area that I stay away from. I just don't want to deal with what I consider unethical practices.
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Old 06-03-2010, 12:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by latetotheparty View Post
so if the dog had kennel cough when sent home and the adopters took meds from the rescue for the kennel cough, they KNEW the dog was ill when they brought him home..... they could have left him with the rescue for a few more days while he was treated for the kennel cough......

and how did you find out that your dog actually needed its shots and hadn't had them while in rescue??






just like anything else in life, there are good rescues and not-so-good rescues..... i fostered a fella for a couple of months last summer for a rescue here in st. louis.... they were REALLY hoping that i would adopt him, but i knew within a week or so that he was NOT going to be a good fit for our household.... they withheld what I considered VERY important information about this dog's attitude and behavior.... which was the reason he was returned to the rescue in the 1st place.... after having lived in a home for nearly a year and having graduated with honors from 2 or 3 levels of obedience training.....

he was adopted while being fostered in my house and then returned AGAIN.... they told me for some other reason, but i don't know about that.... and FINALLY found his perfect forever home about a month after that..... i happened to go into petco when that couple was meeting him and talking to the rescue about him during that day's adoption event. i stopped and chatted with them awhile.... told them what a GREAT dog he had the potential to be.... but was also very honest about the issues that i had had with him..... i thought the rescue lady was going to bore holes through me with her stare..... but i, for one, believe that a potential adopter should know as much as possible about the dog.... the good, the bad and the non-issues.... so, this couple went into the adoption with eyes wide open and well prepared..... and he has finally found a successful forever home......

i am sorry you are disappointed with the rescues you and your friends have had dealings with..... but please don't let that sour you on all of them..... there are a LOT of great, hardworking rescues out there who want their dogs to be successfully placed.... and withholding or concealing information about the dog is NOT the way to do it.....
I believe that, and you, and found to genuinly love his foster mom...but I do know, what you did was right...honest and the thing to do....

While looking at Petfinder and applying for another dog, I found them to be quit smug...about needing to have a fenced in yard....now, I've had dogs all my life, dobies, a redbone coonhound, beagles, black lab and bigger dogs, absolutely need a fenced in yard, along with greyhounds etc...however, small dog breeds, do not...it's convenient and nice if you do, but they don't require it...

what gauls me is some of these rescue people are snobs...I'm sorry, but they are...just like everything else, each and every person has they're very own opinion, so they're beliefs are not the gospel...b/c each individual dog is different, with different needs...little dogs, run around the house like it's they're personal play yard....as my dog does, and to insist that a little dog needs a fenced in yard is ludicrist...and slims down the chances for that poor dog to find a good home....

I don't know, sometimes people just do not use the brain God gave them...?

I want to thank you for your input...and again...

my girlfriend who just got the dog told them she wanted a young dog...so they claimed the dog was 1 1/2 years old...and I understand the dog had kennel cough, she was full blown into it, however, they should not of sent her home that sick period. Not to mention, all the neighbors dogs could get it...I'm very very fussy about other dogs, and will not allow anyone to bring they're dog to my home...drink out of my dog's dish...I was taught that by my aunt who bred and showed german shepards and that is just what I believe, as well as, against dog parks big time, that is the easiest way for a dog to pick something up, like worms, etc. B/c there are some people that are not good dog owners...
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Old 06-03-2010, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Austin
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I have been a foster for two years of dogs and cats for a New York City rescue group. All of the animals are pulled from the high kill shelter, most directly from the euthanasia waiting room, and placed in foster homes. If someone is interested in an animal I am fostering, they come to my home and meet the pet. I tell the potential adopter all I know and provide the shelter paperwork for review. However, some animals are adopted quickly, after a few days, and I may not know if there are any issues because it takes a while for the animal to show its personality after being in a high stress kill shelter or abandoned by his/her owner. If they are with me for a few weeks or more I can and do give a complete assessment. As for kennell cough or URI, it can take several days to know if the animal is infected so I don't know if I only have them a few days.

As to age, it is difficult sometimes to know because many animals have been treated poorly, are strays so no background, or won't allow the shelter vet to look at their teeth when so stressed out. Our rescue group uses the age estimated by the shelter or the age stated by pet's surrendering owner and documented on the shelter paperwork. There is never an attempt to mislead.

Rescue is not an exact science. It's a labor of love and one that brings me much joy for the animal and for the lovely people who chose to adopt rather than buy a pet. I'm disappointed you and others had a bad experience. It is unfortunate that stories like yours may discourage someone from potentially adopting an animal from a rescue. I hope not.

PS. All of the fosters for the rescue I work with are volunteers and receive no compensation. In fact, most of us buy all the rescue animal's food and very often chip in money for our foster animal or other foster animals' medical needs.

Last edited by texan2yankee; 06-03-2010 at 12:34 PM.. Reason: Add PS
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Old 06-03-2010, 12:09 PM
 
26,309 posts, read 24,361,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
I do a lot of volunteer work with a dog rescue. I've fostered numerous dogs. Everything is our best guess. We pull dogs from rural shelters where we know absolutely zero about their history. We guess their breed, guess their age, and hope that the public realizes they're educated guesses at best. Vets can't guess the age anymore than our dog-pros can. You look at the teeth, look for signs of aging, and estimate. My vet thinks my dog is 2. She's at least 5.

The shots situation is another story--that should have been sorted out.

Unfortunately, there are good rescues and bad rescues. There are a couple in my area that I stay away from. I just don't want to deal with what I consider unethical practices.
I think today in this economy, the dog and cat rescues are overloaded...they don't have room or the adequate help they need, and I'm very understanding about that...

but in they're haste to get these dogs a home, I believe they are becoming less and less efficent at times...

I'm just very angry that my girlfriend was so taken for granted...this dog is certainly loved by her, and she will be well taken care of...and it was love at first sight...
I just think they should not have sent the dog home that sick...however, I do know that kennel cough is a few weeks...but still? How would you feel...she wanted a younger dog...and you never know, both our dogs may outlive both of us? But....well....you know what I'm trying to explain...honesty is the only and best policy....
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Old 06-03-2010, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,542,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I think today in this economy, the dog and cat rescues are overloaded...they don't have room or the adequate help they need, and I'm very understanding about that...

but in they're haste to get these dogs a home, I believe they are becoming less and less efficent at times...

I'm just very angry that my girlfriend was so taken for granted...this dog is certainly loved by her, and she will be well taken care of...and it was love at first sight...
I just think they should not have sent the dog home that sick...however, I do know that kennel cough is a few weeks...but still? How would you feel...she wanted a younger dog...and you never know, both our dogs may outlive both of us? But....well....you know what I'm trying to explain...honesty is the only and best policy....
I agree...but what I'm saying is they may have been honest when they said they thought the dog was 2. Maybe the former owners who dumped the dog told the rescue he was 2, and they took them at their word. Heck, the vet may have been wrong, and the dog may be a very elderly 2 (if he was abused or malnourished in his former situation), not 6 years old. Maybe everyone's wrong, and the dog is 3 and a half. No one will ever know--you can't ask the dog when its birthday is!

If all three stories you told are from the same rescue, then there's a sketchy problem with that group and I would avoid them in the future. Otherwise though, I think I'd choose to go in with the benefit of the doubt that the rescue really didn't know better.
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Old 06-03-2010, 12:20 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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Add me to the list of those who hate to hear when someone is disappointed with the adoption of a rescued dog/cat. We have been involved in animal rescue for many years - to include fostering, and like texan2yankee - we told all we knew about the foster dog to potential families, to include the good, bad and ugly.

Sometimes adoptions were finalized when a foster dog 'was due' for vaccinations - it happens - we always encouraged the new family to do this, as they were required to set up a first visit with their vet within 2 weeks of the adoption, so this allowed them to see first hand, how their new dog handled a vet appointment. If the cost of the vaccinations is a concern for you - you could ask the rescue to reimburse you, although that does sort of imply you might not be in a position to provide routine care for your new dog....not 'you' per se - you generalized....

As for the sick dog your friend adopted - why didn't she refuse to take the dog?.....kennel cough is not that big of deal in the big picture - it requires antibiotic and careful watch - but like the common cold for us, it really just needs to run its course - so if the adopter were adament about taking the dog, and the rescue felt the adopter was fully-informed about the care of the kennel cough, then I'm not surprised the rescue allowed your friend to take the dog....the dog probably was getting as good or better care with your friend, the dog's forever family, or the rescue wouldn't have approved the adoption.

As for guestimating the age of a dog with an unknown history - well that is a complete and total crap shoot. We most often use 'windows' of age in our groups - like we believe him to be between 3 and 5......or the vet estimates him to be about 7-8 years of age, based on the condition of his teeth. Honestly rescues cannot know with any certainty - and vets can only GUESS.........I personally have a dog that is now about 11 years old...each year, without fail, when we visit our vet for his annual, she says "he's about 6, right?" as she examines his teeth.......we always laugh - because this dog never gets his teeth cleaned, but has the most beautiful teeth at his age. She has seen him annually for 9 years....but again - if she didn't know him - she'd guess he was 6......he wandered up as a stray when he was 'about' 18 months old - that guess came from the vet who neutered him - based on the 'mature drop of his testicles'.....

If you are happy with your dog - and your friend is happy with hers....it's all good, right?......most rescues are all volunteer based - people with good hearts who do the best they know to do with what they have, on very limited funds, with little to no information about the dog at the start.....you have repeated that folks in rescue are snobs....that's not always the case....many of us are just like you - in love with dogs who need permanent families....and in our efforts to do the right thing, we might even be 'wrong' on a thing or two, regarding a dog we just met in recent months or days.....

Enjoy your dog - and try not to act like each day is his last because you believe he could be older than you thought - he's surely believing each day is his FIRST!

Remember - your vet is guessing too

AND - THANK YOU - for adopting a rescued dog!!! Please thank your friend as well!!! The two you adopted made room for two more to come into safety within rescue!!!

Last edited by Rottnboys; 06-03-2010 at 12:31 PM.. Reason: added thank you :o)
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