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Old 08-12-2010, 06:28 AM
 
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I already find today's world hard to bear, not physically, but mentally and emotionally. I am glad I will be dead 30 years from now. At the surface life seems to be more comfortable today (at least for those fortunate enough to live in the West) than during the Middle Ages, but I doubt our system based on growth has a future. I guess productivity, efficiency and speed in general cause more problems than they solve. What will all those people do when on the one hand machines do even more of their work while on the other hand people with jobs don't want to support those without work. That is already a problem today.

And extending our life spans? What for? Why would I even want to live 100 or 150 years? The longer we live, the less willing we are to let go. Nor does age go hand in hand with wisdom anymore. There are so many old people who are just as stupid as young ones.
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Old 08-12-2010, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Castle Hills
1,054 posts, read 1,521,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I already find today's world hard to bear, not physically, but mentally and emotionally. I am glad I will be dead 30 years from now. At the surface life seems to be more comfortable today (at least for those fortunate enough to live in the West) than during the Middle Ages, but I doubt our system based on growth has a future. I guess productivity, efficiency and speed in general cause more problems than they solve. What will all those people do when on the one hand machines do even more of their work while on the other hand people with jobs don't want to support those without work. That is already a problem today.

And extending our life spans? What for? Why would I even want to live 100 or 150 years? The longer we live, the less willing we are to let go. Nor does age go hand in hand with wisdom anymore. There are so many old people who are just as stupid as young ones.
So depressing but so true too.
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,770 posts, read 1,075,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post

I already find today's world hard to bear, not physically, but mentally
and emotionally. I am glad I will be dead 30 years from now.

I don't envy the young.

They don't even have the "luxury" of an innocent childhood.

No wonder God in His mercy has seen to it there are fewer and fewer children
being born for the world to corrupt.



~
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:18 AM
 
273 posts, read 327,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhtrico1850 View Post
The Human Genome and the Human Being - The Corner - National Review Online Hope you're right. The much ballyhooed genome thing didn't work out so well though... Solar power equivalent from coal just shifts one mode of production to another, albeit it is "cleaner". We would be wealthier when energy becomes cheaper period.
These scientists are saying that mapping the genome isn’t a big deal, therefore genomic research isn’t a big deal. In one regard they are right: mapping the genome didn’t do much. It was a huge milestone, but it was basically like looking at hieroglyphics without the Rosetta Stone.

It’s only now that we are beginning to decode the genomes of humans, as well as viruses and organisms. We are going from “mapping sequences” to understanding the importance of different sequences. Our primary tools for doing this are powerful computers that weren't very affordable 10 years ago.

In the 20th century, medicine was basically like trying to work on a car in the dark without popping the hood. In the past 10 years, the genome process has given us glimpses of the internal workings. In the upcoming 10-15 years, we will acquire complete understand the internal workings—i.e, we will understand the human genome like the back of our hand.

This is will allow us to hone in on specific problems of the genome—those that lead aging or certain types of cancers. Will learn to either “silence” certain problem sequences or repair mutations and damage.

They also fail to mention how we map the genomes of viruses with increasing speed. In 15-20 years, we will engineer drugs at a faster rate than most viruses can evolve. In effect, our biotech industry will evolve faster than Mother Nature.

Genomic research is in its infancy. No one is denying that. But to dismiss it is like living in the 1980’s and dismissing the idea of the internet.

Last edited by mcredux; 08-12-2010 at 10:27 AM..
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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Even though I don't feel old at age 61, I cannot say that I am any wiser than I was at age 30.
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:36 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Even though I don't feel old at age 61, I cannot say that I am any wiser than I was at age 30.
That insight is already a sign of wisdom

I am not as old as you, but I do feel a lot wiser now than 20 years ago. But I don't think I will be much wiser 20 years from now. I guess there are only so many lessons one can learn from life. After that one can only try to live according to one's insights, which can be enough of a challenge.
I guess wisdom requires a certain amount of humility, and this is not the age of humility.
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Old 08-12-2010, 11:51 AM
 
13,820 posts, read 11,368,333 times
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Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
mysticaltyger wrote:
The key to good, and cheap health care is living a healthier lifestyle.
You and I know this, and unfortunately so does big pharma and the rest of the health care scammers, so it'll never happen. A healthy population is not good for the health care business. The health care scammers will do everything in their power to keep people unhealthy.
No question about that. It's one of those things people are going to have to open their eyes to. We say we hate big pharma....and then we go out and eat fake food, making ourselves dependent on the companies we say we hate. This will have to end. And it will, one way or another....either before we go bankrupt trying to pay for all these pills and treatments....or afterward. The choice is ours. We have more control over our lives than we are willing to admit.
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Old 08-12-2010, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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mysticaltyger wrote:
The choice is ours. We have more control over our lives than we are willing to admit.
While that is still true today, that may not be the case if Codex Alimentarius (World Food Code ) comes to pass. Most people I've mentioned this to are not even aware of its existence. If this takes effect, Our Economic Future Will Not Be So Bright because most people will be too sick to care about it.
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Old 08-12-2010, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,278 posts, read 583,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chromekitty View Post
yeah because those who are unemployed or under employed or just plain have no income at all can afford to eat along the lines of a healthy lifestyle

You do the best with what you have and if the only sustenance you take in is junk food, then that is better than no food at all. So, here we go again just blaming people for being lazy blah, blah........
This is incorrect. Eating healthy is cheap. One apple costs about $.50 as opposed to a bag of potato chips, which will likely run you $2.00. A vitamin-packed banana costs approximately $.10 as opposed to a bag of sugary candy that costs $1.00. A couple protein/vitamin-filled hard boiled eggs will cost you about $.20. I can buy a pound of lean ground turkey for less than $4.00. Vegetables are cheap, too, especially if you go to a good produce market.

I think it's just that the people who eat fattening junk food are just too lazy to prepare something nutritious OR they have little self control over choosing foods that are good for you over foods that are bad for you.
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Old 08-12-2010, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,278 posts, read 583,849 times
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Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
Good point, we will probably never get beyond the myth of lacking personal responsibility being the reason for poor diet and many other of societies ills. This supposed lacking has become the mantra of the right wing radio shouters in order to deflect the glaring lack of education and money in the lower classes and the causes therein. The government that favors the corporate elite will never regulate the food industry to the point of requiring decent wholesome food over the tremendous profits garnered from the Mcfood that has dominated the marketplace.
Living a healthy lifestyle is a choice and can be extremely cost effective. You can exercise for free by doing push ups, pull ups or jogging. You can even buy a cheap bicycle and do some cycling around town.

Healthy fruits and vegetables are so much cheaper than greasy, fattenting snack foods. Think about it next time you see poor little Tammy Sue walk out of a gas station with a Sunkist Orange Soda, a bag of potato chips, a bag of Skittles, and a candy bar for $5 when she could have had an apple, a banana, and a bottle of water for under $2.00.

Last edited by mcb1025; 08-12-2010 at 03:00 PM..
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