U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 01-09-2013, 01:58 PM
 
2,379 posts, read 4,354,413 times
Reputation: 891

Advertisements

The mayor of Newark went on food stamps for a week, as an experiment. It's only about $30 per week and barely enough to live on. Is that what all people get from food stamps??

Aren't food stamp users also on other forms of aid?

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&....1.i3UuN2qC1fg
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-09-2013, 02:36 PM
 
3,887 posts, read 5,136,022 times
Reputation: 4574
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpasa View Post
The mayor of Newark went on food stamps for a week, as an experiment. It's only about $30 per week and barely enough to live on. Is that what all people get from food stamps??

Aren't food stamp users also on other forms of aid?

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&....1.i3UuN2qC1fg
It's should only cover, what you can eat on NOT live on. It's not about covering all living costs.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 69,949,006 times
Reputation: 27520
It depends where you live. And food stamps is supposed to be a supplement source, not the primary and only source.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2013, 05:04 PM
 
9,855 posts, read 13,946,656 times
Reputation: 10742
30 a week single person? Plenty. He has no idea how to spend them.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2013, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
11,920 posts, read 13,270,021 times
Reputation: 12663
I've frequently spent $30/week or less for groceries a week. For the most part, I still have food left over for the next week. Now, if you plan to eat prime rib or lobster tails, that $30 won't go quite as far. Decisions, decisions...

The reason many people spend more is because they buy heavily processed foods, soda, and other unnecessary junk. It's also one of the reasons Americans are so out of shape.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2013, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
13,467 posts, read 15,072,372 times
Reputation: 11932
Quote:
Originally Posted by andywire View Post
I've frequently spent $30/week or less for groceries a week. For the most part, I still have food left over for the next week. Now, if you plan to eat prime rib or lobster tails, that $30 won't go quite as far. Decisions, decisions...

The reason many people spend more is because they buy heavily processed foods, soda, and other unnecessary junk. It's also one of the reasons Americans are so out of shape.
$30 is really tight, especially with food prices having gone up. When I was in college, I budgeted $50, but that was about five years ago. The was plenty of room for expensive wheat bread, heirloom tomatoes, avocado, deli cuts, organic milk, chicken breast, and the half gallon of ice cream and odd chocolate bar. Cutting out the fluff could have got it down to $30/week then, but I don't know about now.

Flour has doubled in price since then. I don't use a whole lot of flour, but bread is up 50 cents a loaf, rice is up from 50-60 cents to 70-75, pasta up from around 80 cents to $1.30, coffee has doubled in price, beer about 30%, potatoes are up a bit, eggs are quite a bit more almost never see $1 a dozen. Vegetables and fruits have gone up a bit, but not as much as the staples. I imagine it's doable, but it would be a very boring diet very heavy on rice and beans.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
8,013 posts, read 22,549,458 times
Reputation: 9233
Hubby and I average about $75 on groceries (both food and household goods) per week. For 2 people. That's only slightly more than $30/person. We don't cut any coupons, and we don't comparison shop. Just don't have the time.

If someone is on food stamps, I assume they have more free time on their hands, and should be able to cut coupons. I know coupon cutters (not even extreme ones) who only spend $50ish on groceries each week for a family of 5.

$30/week/person is plenty if you cut coupons.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2013, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
11,920 posts, read 13,270,021 times
Reputation: 12663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
$30 is really tight, especially with food prices having gone up. When I was in college, I budgeted $50, but that was about five years ago. The was plenty of room for expensive wheat bread, heirloom tomatoes, avocado, deli cuts, organic milk, chicken breast, and the half gallon of ice cream and odd chocolate bar. Cutting out the fluff could have got it down to $30/week then, but I don't know about now.

Flour has doubled in price since then. I don't use a whole lot of flour, but bread is up 50 cents a loaf, rice is up from 50-60 cents to 70-75, pasta up from around 80 cents to $1.30, coffee has doubled in price, beer about 30%, potatoes are up a bit, eggs are quite a bit more almost never see $1 a dozen. Vegetables and fruits have gone up a bit, but not as much as the staples. I imagine it's doable, but it would be a very boring diet very heavy on rice and beans.
I live in a relatively expensive part of the country. I'll bet you would have no problem if you tried. I don't buy prepared items, ice cream, chocolate, etc. I don't buy deli cuts. I make my sandwiches for work with chunks of meat from the night before. I don't buy Kraft miracle whip. I buy their cheaper competitors, usually Centrella, which costs half as much. Most name brands have discount competitors that taste just fine. I do tend to eat rice more often that most, but that's also because it's easy to work with and convenient. Doesn't take long to fry some up with eggs, veggies, meat, etc. Olive oil makes anything taste delicious, and a $5 bottle lasts me forever. One thing I can't complain about is the low cost of produce. It's actually easier on the budget to incorporate many healthy foods into your diet.

Me personally, I probably spend about $100/month on groceries, and I never miss a meal or go to bed hungry. When I go to the store, I don't really even look to pinch the penny, because I still buy what I want without much regard for price.

Just saw pork shoulder on sale for 89 cents a lb. Use the bone to make stock for some veggie soup. I do the same thing when I cook chicken. Use flour to thicken it up and make a meal out of it. $5 bag last me nearly a year.

I could go on and on...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2013, 12:32 PM
 
Location: World
3,153 posts, read 3,216,901 times
Reputation: 2071
Bag of potatoes, Cans of Beans, Cheapest Bread, Chicken Leg Quarters, Milk. It can be done if you live in small town.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2013, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,018 posts, read 5,098,072 times
Reputation: 3464
I live off $30 a week in groceries IN Chicago. I also eat like crap though. I am sure if I ate healthier it would be harder. haha
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top