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Old 02-22-2013, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna.
11,424 posts, read 6,827,771 times
Reputation: 14495

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Some are speculating that the problems with big box retail is that people are buying via the internet. I'm not so sure.
But if so, that option has been providing me with a respectable paycheck (at age 63, BTW) and avoiding the headaches of dealing with a public which expects too much, for the last 2 &1/2 years.

Beats the hell out of reading from a script in a call center.
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Old 02-22-2013, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
11,920 posts, read 13,287,603 times
Reputation: 12670
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmw335xi View Post

All this doom and gloom is preventing you from making money.

There are plenty of opportunities out there, but if you are all doom and gloom, you'll never see them until the economy is at its peak.
I make plenty of money to afford a decent lifestyle. I would say I'm one of the lucky young folks who has made it... So far. It's definitely not easy these days, and many of my friends that I keep in touch with from HS are struggling just to get out of their parents house. Many of them went to college, which was something I sort of skipped.

The market is doing great. My stocks have been paying fat dividends, and the gains are impressive. The stock market traditionally performs very well when the labor market is crappy. My guess is companies are able to push workers harder, and pay them less. Big corporations do great when the smaller companies doing work for them are competing fiercely as well.

Just my observation though. Things are much more competitive for your average Joe. You can't just walk your way into a high paying career because you have a college degree anymore. As a further kick to the pants, you'll pay considerably more for that degree.

I'm thankful I entered the job market at 16 in 2004. Companies were willing to train back then. I suspect so many young folks are having a hard time getting their foot in the door because companies have cut back on training. I do feel sorry for the ones collecting dust at their parent's house.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Wolf View Post
We have lost most of the good paying factory jobs.
Explains why the middle class is disapearing.

Many rural folks( some my relatives ) headed to the cities with a strong work ethic and little education.
They are in their 80's now and did quite well.

A few of my uncles drove newer cars,put their kids through college, have a comfortable house in the city AND a lake cabin. They got hired by a good factory and worked there 40 + years.

Those days are gone.

I voted for Ross Perot and Pat Buchanan so don't blame me !

There's still good paying factory jobs out there that pay a middle class wage. The issue is the low skilled work that used to pay decent has been all but eliminated. Any of that work that needs to be done is either done by illegals, robots or in China. Even the illegals can't compete with a 25K robot. You can still be the machinist, who will have to learn how to program and maintain the equipment. Plenty of demand for good toolmakers and engineers too. There is less demand for workers in these occupations compared to 20 years ago, but there are also far fewer of them available for work these days. The biggest reason there are less jobs in my opinion is it takes less factories/plants to produce the same amount of work.

Thing is, Ross Perot was highlighting the problems that would arise if we entered into trade agreements with lower wage developing nations. Even he did not foresee a time when robots could eliminate millions, yes MILLIONS of jobs. Most of these jobs were honest jobs done by Americans who may have lacked the capacity to achieve such success in higher knowledge/skill occupations. It's not their fault, and America did have a need for these people in the past. Today, these folks are all but unemployable except for the lowest paying jobs. This is why the demand for welfare and government handouts will only grow with time.

I get a little sick of conservatives bashing people who would like to do honest work, but aren't capable of obtaining higher skillsets. Even today's factory worker must bring a more extensive knowledge and experience base to the table in order to be successful. In order to remain employable, they must also be capable of learning new skills quite regularly, because technology moves fast. Fall behind, and watch your career go out the window. That is the America we live in, and there is intense demand for a ticket to the middle class table.
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Old 02-22-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Maine
2,351 posts, read 1,588,004 times
Reputation: 4203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Im wondering if there is any impact on food & drink establishments.

Some fast food and mid-range table-service restaurants used to cater to the now-shrinking middle class. Places like Golden Corral, McDonalds (of course), Olive Garden, etc.

I am noticing a sort of upscaling of fast food...places like Chipolte and Five Guys.
The Darden corperation has down graded it's outlook for Olive Garden, Longhorn, and RedLobster. There all hurting.
Red Lobster owner Darden Restaurants cuts outlook - CBS News



bill
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Old 02-22-2013, 06:25 PM
 
5,507 posts, read 9,021,506 times
Reputation: 2276
Economies change. If you want to live in the past and not learn new skills you are going to see your lifestyle decrease. In many cases that is the fault of the person. So many people want to lifestyle they had back during the boom years but don't realize they were being overvalued just like their homes.
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
11,920 posts, read 13,287,603 times
Reputation: 12670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatornation View Post
Economies change. If you want to live in the past and not learn new skills you are going to see your lifestyle decrease. In many cases that is the fault of the person. So many people want to lifestyle they had back during the boom years but don't realize they were being overvalued just like their homes.
I think the argument being presented goes far beyond the individual and their ability to adapt and compete. Avoid looking at the microcosm and contemplate the effects of individual struggle multiplied by 350 million. Supposing 20-25% of the workforce is incapable of staying on top of the modern demands of the private sector, that will translate into less consumers with disposable income to consume the goods and servicing being offered. I don't necessarily think it's doom and gloom as some are suggesting. More than anything, the new normal may be sluggish demand, intense competition, and volatile business cycles. Perhaps the greater effect will be that related to chronic stress on our population.

For what it's worth, I have noticed far fewer people frequenting the restaurants and stores around the area. Leaving work today, I stopped for some carry out. Place what dead. In fact, the entire plaza, which is normally jam packed on a Friday was rather slow. Stopped at the liquor store for a dirty 30... Well, people still got money for booze.

Obviously, I will be researching which microbrewery to invest in next.
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:05 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,586 posts, read 11,679,485 times
Reputation: 24306
I think there's lots of stores that are doing well. Dinosaurs tend to become extinct after awhile. People have found new ways of shopping, online or through other outlets. These B&M stores just need to catch up.
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Old 02-23-2013, 02:47 AM
 
Location: NSW
2,562 posts, read 1,706,734 times
Reputation: 879
A tongue in cheek response.




The state of our Union is PATHETIC - YouTube
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