U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-18-2007, 01:26 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,515,993 times
Reputation: 2708

Advertisements

We have gas now , at about 3.40 per gal. Diesel is 3.70 per gal. ( that will come down once winter fuel demands are known ). However , it is possible that the days of 3.00 gas are numbered. Even if the world prices go down , due to excess amounts of the stuff , as does happen from time to time, taxes and local demand , will keep the pump price high.........how much is too much ? , that , is a question that we have not had to address yet. The public just keeps driving , now more than ever. This holiday season it is predicted that auto travel will be more than ever. We haven't reached the price at the pump , that , will cause people not to buy the stuff.
What would change the way we drive , is , if we had gas shortages again , like in the 70s......and 80s some. For the price to make a real difference , I think gas will need to go to 6.00 per gal.maybe more........pump shock is real however . people complain about paying 50.00 for a fill up. yet , they will spend 20.00 for a Starbucks for two/w/ a slice of lemon loaf, so , it IS about what we are used to paying.......... if you have a SUV , 100.00 per fill is common , now , it will be 125.00 or more for a fill , if , you have a large tank, no big deal , its just a couple of Starbucks less , I will be able to afford , or , I will do the coffee thing anyway.
We may see the day , if the Country goes to war again in the middle east , when oil will top 200.00 per barrel. Then we will see 10.00 per gal at the pump , and , then , it will really hurt. But , what will hurt more , is the fact that in Europe , they will be paying 20.00 per gal. and , that will set of economic problems like we have never seen before, in , this world economy , that buys all its durable,consumable, goods from China.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-18-2007, 01:36 PM
 
28 posts, read 69,434 times
Reputation: 22
I feel freer now that we've gone to one car than when we had two, and I anticipate a change in pace and convenience when we get rid of the second one, so it doesn't scare me. I figure I've spent tons of money on devaluing cars over the years, and the thought of THAT is troubling. After doing some research, I do think there are walkable/bikeable places where the cost of living isn't exorbitant. I'm sure we'll have to also live smaller, but that doesn't bother us much at all. At one point we had a large house, and sold it after 3 years when we saw that we hardly used 50% of it. I guess it's all about what you're willing to trade for the things you value. If we want a road trip, we'll just rent a car for a weekend. Still much cheaper than owning! And if I can contribute just a little bit to reducing our use of gas, that's just icing on the cake. If more of us looked around and decided to live in more walkable areas, then I think we'd have a lot more of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2007, 03:40 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,515,993 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by pomegranate View Post
I feel freer now that we've gone to one car than when we had two, and I anticipate a change in pace and convenience when we get rid of the second one, so it doesn't scare me. I figure I've spent tons of money on devaluing cars over the years, and the thought of THAT is troubling. After doing some research, I do think there are walkable/bikeable places where the cost of living isn't exorbitant. I'm sure we'll have to also live smaller, but that doesn't bother us much at all. At one point we had a large house, and sold it after 3 years when we saw that we hardly used 50% of it. I guess it's all about what you're willing to trade for the things you value. If we want a road trip, we'll just rent a car for a weekend. Still much cheaper than owning! And if I can contribute just a little bit to reducing our use of gas, that's just icing on the cake. If more of us looked around and decided to live in more walkable areas, then I think we'd have a lot more of them.
You pose a different mind set here , I think , than what it seemed at first. If you purpose to downsize , cut back , and just try to live within your means , great ! You are correct , a whole lot of people have spent like drunkin sailors, including out Government , and , look where we are today ! Things do not have to be bigger to be better.
A changing lifestyle is on the horizon , for all of us. I believe being ahead of the curve is a good thing............ I would look into smaller cities, or larger towns ,that are progressive , that have a predominate downtown area, lots of bike trails , and walkways. Bike trails can also service as walkways. Places that have undergone urban renewal, restoration , and do not essentially have to depend on big box store parking lots to survive are good choices. Look for a large presence of higher learning , a place where education is the prime job base, and a place that has a good medical awareness, with top rate hospital facilities.
People who are into riding bikes , are often ahead of the curve here , ( not always ) , so take a look at the top rated cities and towns that are riding oriented ....... Marquette , Mi. is on top of the list. There are others , just look it up on the bike sites , there are lots.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2007, 04:39 PM
 
392 posts, read 1,686,334 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
People who are into riding bikes , are often ahead of the curve here , ( not always ) , so take a look at the top rated cities and towns that are riding oriented ....... Marquette , Mi. is on top of the list. There are others , just look it up on the bike sites , there are lots.....
BRRRR....Marquette is beautiful but I wouldn't want to walk or bike around there all winter.
Even in the suburbs car free living can be relatively easy if you pick your area. I still have a car but rarely use it.
Within walking distance of my home I have a job, doctors, dentist, shopping, post office, hair salon etc. I still have a home with a yard and plenty of room to garden. At rush hour my commute is actually shorter on foot than it would be by car. I feel like one of the luckiest people alive as I walk by all those folks stuck in their cars.
As Pomegranate said there is a freedom in getting rid of your car. I just past on an opportunity to move to a more prestigious less populated area. It would have required me to use a car for everything and I have no interest in going back to that life style.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2007, 05:21 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,515,993 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by stock66 View Post
BRRRR....Marquette is beautiful but I wouldn't want to walk or bike around there all winter.
Even in the suburbs car free living can be relatively easy if you pick your area. I still have a car but rarely use it.
Within walking distance of my home I have a job, doctors, dentist, shopping, post office, hair salon etc. I still have a home with a yard and plenty of room to garden. At rush hour my commute is actually shorter on foot than it would be by car. I feel like one of the luckiest people alive as I walk by all those folks stuck in their cars.
As Pomegranate said there is a freedom in getting rid of your car. I just past on an opportunity to move to a more prestigious less populated area. It would have required me to use a car for everything and I have no interest in going back to that life style.
I brought up Marquette , cause of its outstanding bike trail efforts. A shining example of what a small city can do .Those folks are ahead of the curve.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2007, 05:33 PM
 
28 posts, read 69,434 times
Reputation: 22
I'm sure Marquette is great -- it's wonderful when city officials actually plan ahead to make a place liveable. Minneapolis is another great walkable city in the upper midwest; lived there for 3 years, but the gray got me down! My husband grew up in Madison and biked there quite a bit around the lakes. I'm hoping to find something of that ilk further south where there's more sun -- I grew up in the desert, and really believe that our early geography makes a huge impact on us; I crave flat land and light. Someone told me on another thread to check out St. Augustine or Gainesville, FL-- does anyone know much about them?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2007, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,257 posts, read 4,931,915 times
Reputation: 3029
My city in Connecticut is looking at redeveloping its downtown. There is a large piece of property in the downtown that could be a catalyst for smart growth/self-sustaining building technology. However, the reality is that private developers are not going to do it with their own money and the public will not support financing a large project that will substantially raise everyone's taxes.

In order for American cities and towns to step up to the challenges of the 21st century job growth linked to the world market needs to improve substantially. Prior 2nd and 3rd tier countries are leapfrogging ahead of the US in the development of their cities. Places like South Korea, Taiwan, and even parts of Africa are incorporating the latest advances in technology into the building of their cities.

America was the new frontier throughout the 1800 and early 1900s. We need to revisit that spirit and reinvigorate our economy to become the world leaders in alternate energy research and development and self-sustaining building technology.

Another Taco Bell, Dunkin Donuts, or Walmart is not going to secure our future in a global market.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2007, 12:47 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,578 posts, read 13,515,993 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
My city in Connecticut is looking at redeveloping its downtown. There is a large piece of property in the downtown that could be a catalyst for smart growth/self-sustaining building technology. However, the reality is that private developers are not going to do it with their own money and the public will not support financing a large project that will substantially raise everyone's taxes.

In order for American cities and towns to step up to the challenges of the 21st century job growth linked to the world market needs to improve substantially. Prior 2nd and 3rd tier countries are leapfrogging ahead of the US in the development of their cities. Places like South Korea, Taiwan, and even parts of Africa are incorporating the latest advances in technology into the building of their cities.

America was the new frontier throughout the 1800 and early 1900s. We need to revisit that spirit and reinvigorate our economy to become the world leaders in alternate energy research and development and self-sustaining building technology.

Another Taco Bell, Dunkin Donuts, or Walmart is not going to secure our future in a global market.
Good post. Unfortunately , its that " world market" , that has helped to get us into the mess we are in. We must get back to some balance........ A quick look at our neighbor to the north , will show how they have handled the problem.( Canada has lots of the same downtown decay ). The most striking example I have ever seen of what a city can do , in severe conditions by the way , is Yellowknife , NWT. Its amazing !........when everyone pulls together great things can happen to a community.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2007, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,483,762 times
Reputation: 4893
Actually, we are in the market for a Motorhome to expand our road trips.

We live in a somewhat "rural" area and my daily commute to my office is about 90 miles -

Neither of the above is going to change -
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2007, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Yucaipa, California
9,616 posts, read 17,799,334 times
Reputation: 6270
The foul oil companies have a tight hold on us & the govt/states wont do a damn thing about it.PATHETIC !!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top