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Old 11-14-2007, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,226,903 times
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People always talk about buying property, but property taxes assure that is is never yours. Is there anywhere in the United States that you can buy a property and never take the risk of losing it to property taxes?
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Old 11-14-2007, 07:28 PM
 
2,541 posts, read 10,188,047 times
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Nebraska, I hear they are having a serious problem with population decline. It should be easier to buy property there

A lot of NYers are moving to NC to buy. It is actually a funny mix, ever see my cousin vinny.
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Old 11-14-2007, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Tucson
42,837 posts, read 77,102,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
People always talk about buying property, but property taxes assure that is is never yours. Is there anywhere in the United States that you can buy a property and never take the risk of losing it to property taxes?
Hmm, there still are a few places, but that's about to change... I found out about this very recently. In AZ these places are Mesa (Metro Phoenix), Sahuarita, Marana, and Oro Valley (Metro Tucson).

I was asking about it myself:

Property Taxes (or lack thereof)

As you can see from the thread, the issue didn't become any more clear to me... it might make more sense to you. In any event, the lack of taxes isn't gonna last long. Marana in particular has a 99.9% chance to be hit by expensive flood insurance. The City of Marana (it is a separate city in case it makes more sense to you tax-wise) is going to fight it, but I'm yet to hear about anybody winning against FEMA.

Marana
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Old 11-14-2007, 08:15 PM
 
168 posts, read 1,057,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sierraAZ View Post
Hmm, there still are a few places, but that's about to change... I found out about this very recently. In AZ these places are Mesa (Metro Phoenix), Sahuarita, Marana, and Oro Valley (Metro Tucson).
Oro Valley has property taxes! They are levied by Pima County, but if you live in Oro Valley, you're paying taxes!! I've been paying them for the 4 years I've owned in Oro Valley....so they're there!
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Old 11-14-2007, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Tucson
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Originally Posted by strawberryfield View Post
Oro Valley has property taxes! They are levied by Pima County, but if you live in Oro Valley, you're paying taxes!! I've been paying them for the 4 years I've owned in Oro Valley....so they're there!
I don't live in Oro Valley. What I said was based on this article:

Property taxes may move into suburbs | www.azstarnet.com ® (http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/208610.php - broken link)

Apparently I misunderstand something about these questionable areas then... To the best of my knowledge, the property taxes on the properties within Tucson city limits are levied by Pima County (the website is called Pima County Assessor Online) and paid to Pima County. Not sure how Oro Valley works (you're not a separate town, are you?), but the local paper says you don't have taxes at this point... If that's not what it's claimed, I've either skimmed the reading way too quickly or I'm on crack [and if I were, I'd be less frustrated ; (not topic related)]
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Old 11-14-2007, 09:57 PM
 
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I've seen some discussion about the real chain of ownership of former Spanish Land Grant properties that lie within USA boundaries and how they (very technically) retain a different chain of title than the rest of the USA land mass.

I recall that some folks tried to challenge USA legal and taxing authority on these lands a few years ago, trying to "drop out", but I don't recall them having any success in escaping taxation upon the property.

For all intents and purposes, if you own land in a county within the USA borders, there's a taxing authority out there that will appraise it's value and assess taxes. So, in the context of the OP, no ... you never really completely "own" your property because it's subject to ownership taxation.
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Old 11-15-2007, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Apex, NC
2,934 posts, read 7,134,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Chutzpah View Post
Nebraska, I hear they are having a serious problem with population decline. It should be easier to buy property there

A lot of NYers are moving to NC to buy. It is actually a funny mix, ever see my cousin vinny.
NC charges property tax on land you "own". NC is growing by leaps and bounds and now has about 10 million people. I would say Nebraska is probably in a little different siuation than we are here in NC.
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Old 11-15-2007, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,719 posts, read 47,472,880 times
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There are places where you can file a 'homestead' for your property, which is supposed to slow the process of the government taking it from you. I do not really trust it though.

My grandparents lost a farm in the 1970's through eminent domain in California.

My suggestion would be to buy land in an area with really low property taxes. That way, even if the taxes doubled or tripled over the next decade you still have relatively low taxes.

Here where I bought, my land taxes are about $1.05 per acre.
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Old 11-15-2007, 08:51 AM
 
5,092 posts, read 9,600,213 times
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How about a graveyard? Long term residents there seem to pay no taxes.


But for real, maybe work a tax-exempt angle? Seems to work good enough for churches, educational operations, and charities. Why not you?
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Old 11-15-2007, 09:11 AM
 
3,698 posts, read 9,982,342 times
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There are plenty of places. There is lots of land in the Southwest and in Alaska where there is little or no taxing authority. Of course, you won't have things like roads or other infrastructure there, but you also won't be paying property taxes.

But, if you are serious about not wanting to pay your dues as a citizen, there are places you can go where those dues are extremely small. You'll be on your own for power, heat and transportation, though.
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