U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-21-2013, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
5,798 posts, read 5,247,470 times
Reputation: 3108

Advertisements

The replacement rate has been plunging on every continent except for Africa, and is dangerously lower in places such as California.

This state certainly won't have nearly enough working taxpayers to pay the legacy costs of its seniors within the next 20/30 years according to an extensive study on a forthcoming shortage of children done by the Lucile Packard Foundation For Children's Health at USC; her late husband was the co-founder of Hewlett-Packard.

The fact that over 3,500,000 Californians have left the state over the past 20 years for other states where the middle class actually has a shot according to Joel Kotkin certainly isn't good either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-22-2013, 03:48 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,919 posts, read 58,068,998 times
Reputation: 29379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv101 View Post
This state certainly won't have nearly enough working taxpayers (earning enough) to pay the legacy costs...
This is a diferent matter than the population level.

Quote:
The fact that over 3,500,000 Californians have left the state over the past 20 years for other states where the middle class actually has a shot according to Joel Kotkin certainly isn't good either.
Because the middle ends up paying the largest portion of the low end burden.

Fewer people earning more and absent the burden of those who can't (won't) support themselves...
and all manner of good things become manageable and on a lower tax rate to boot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2013, 12:03 PM
 
6,363 posts, read 7,355,160 times
Reputation: 10832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv101 View Post
The replacement rate has been plunging on every continent except for Africa, and is dangerously lower in places such as California.

This state certainly won't have nearly enough working taxpayers to pay the legacy costs of its seniors within the next 20/30 years according to an extensive study on a forthcoming shortage of children done by the Lucile Packard Foundation For Children's Health at USC; her late husband was the co-founder of Hewlett-Packard.

The fact that over 3,500,000 Californians have left the state over the past 20 years for other states where the middle class actually has a shot according to Joel Kotkin certainly isn't good either.
Nonsense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2013, 10:42 PM
 
2,409 posts, read 2,496,896 times
Reputation: 1807
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
No but money directs the care and research .
And again, the money doesn't perform the care and research. Now the care and research that would have been devoted to advancing society is instead spent on maintaining the elderly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-27-2013, 12:40 PM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,162,475 times
Reputation: 17979
No ;that is what a program such as ACA means ;no one paying for the research that advances society in medical care. Managed system are like any socialized system in that it produced less because risk does not pay more. There was a program on just the effects of medical device tax and what it means to research for new devices the other night.It the reason that US became the provider of 70% of medical and drug research I the past while other socialized western countries haven't invest much in it. Advanced anything is seldom sold to those who can't afford it as always.Which is why countries actually set price they can pay as even Canada does but its dependent on high paying US to balance. The balance is gone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-27-2013, 07:09 PM
 
5,085 posts, read 3,346,067 times
Reputation: 4895
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
No ;that is what a program such as ACA means ;no one paying for the research that advances society in medical care. Managed system are like any socialized system in that it produced less because risk does not pay more. There was a program on just the effects of medical device tax and what it means to research for new devices the other night.It the reason that US became the provider of 70% of medical and drug research I the past while other socialized western countries haven't invest much in it. Advanced anything is seldom sold to those who can't afford it as always.Which is why countries actually set price they can pay as even Canada does but its dependent on high paying US to balance. The balance is gone.
They don't set the price. They sit down and negotiate with medical device makers to keep the costs in line. Medical device makers in the US have profit margins other industries can only dream of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Sector 001
7,168 posts, read 5,974,016 times
Reputation: 8113
No it's not... it's the government's fault and the federal reserve that we have a banking system that requires 'perpetually accelerating growth' to prevent collapse. What we need is a monetary system capable of zero growth without collapsing.

December 23, 2013 was the 100 year anniversary of the Federal Reserve.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2014, 06:24 PM
 
1,911 posts, read 3,155,795 times
Reputation: 1301
I'd think so...as the population decreases, so does the market value per capita.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2014, 07:40 PM
 
651 posts, read 705,955 times
Reputation: 310
Ponzi schemes don't work well with declining participants.

SS/Medicare/Medicaid aren't going to work well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2014, 03:13 PM
 
Location: DC
2,037 posts, read 2,143,381 times
Reputation: 1773
There is this assumption that a declining population is a bad thing.
It's not, as long as it is gradual. In the US we actually have a problem right now that the population did not decline when it should have, and we are facing an oversupply of labor as a result.

However, now our birth rate is below the replacement rate, and our immigration rate has fallen as well.

Here is the truth, there is something called the demographic-economic paradox. Basically the lower the birth rate the generally more developed a country would be. There is often better investments into education, better resources to reproductive healthcare (contraception specifically), and a better social structure in general. They tend to invest more in their people and have higher productivity as a result. The one thing to note about this though is once it has sufficiently declined, it will also rise back up to just replacement rate levels, as sufficient social policies are put in place to encourage this.

High birthrate countries...are generally poor, and a rapidly increasing population is a BAD thing. The fallacy is that if the human capital is higher, that economic productivity is higher. But we now know that is not really true, an educated workforce can invent things like robots and make thousands of human workers obsolete. One has to measure technological progress against demographics. Human productivity in developed nations rises, where the need for lots of human workers declines, often in line with the birthrate. If it doesn't we have a situation the US has now...labor oversupply and structural unemployment.

It is all a bit counter intuitive, but the paradox is known to be true, the more educated the workforce, the lower the population growth, the better things get, as resources are not as stretched. There is a paradox between high birthrates, and high economic development. You want lower birthrates in order to become a developed nation, and not run into a labor oversupply dilemma.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top