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Old 11-15-2013, 10:19 PM
 
4,972 posts, read 2,505,888 times
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Babyboomers have a plan. They believe an America comprised of 30% of Hispanics will bankroll their SS checks. Buena suerte.
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Old 11-15-2013, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,058 posts, read 7,079,669 times
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IH2puo. Actually it isn't just the USA that is doing this. Many European countries also have very liberal immigration policies in place and so immigrants are moving in, many Muslims from the middle east. Japan is going to allow more immigration. Without telling us, I think this is exactly what is going on. They realize the problems they would have with the declining birth rate, so they are allowing a lot of Hispanics into the country. And, at least in Texas, a lot of them do are productive citizens. What I don't understand is why they have not made our demographic problems more of an issue so that people can get a handle on the problem and then find an acceptable solution.

Of course, its also possible that this demographic problem will not be as bad as we think. With the obesity rate as high as it is, its quite possible that the life expectancy of people will decline. This is already taking place in some states. Women are living, on average, 5 years less.
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Old 11-15-2013, 11:23 PM
 
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Only if your underlying business economic financial system is predicated on measuring growth and success as more units, more velocity, more marginal unit profit, planned obsolescence etc....

A declining population is at the heart of a series of value and philosophical questions that maybe - just maybe - may begin to be at the heart of a real dialogue for humanity on planet earth.

Sadly, I don't have much faith in those in leadership positions to address it in a holistic and equitable way - call me skeptic / cynic but the very basic issues of conflicts in cultures and their value systems are most often determined by the adage that demography is destiny. Whatever the predominant one that remains will most of the time determine the evolving mindset to deal with social / economic / political / issues that these changes in population impact.
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Old 11-16-2013, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Canada
168 posts, read 213,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
I read a little bit on demographics when I can find something. Its interesting that the natural assumption is that declines in population are always bad. I don't think governments like them because it means fewer taxpayers. I don't think business likes it because it means fewer customers. But I guess there are some advantages to a declining population. Less need to use up natural resources. No need to build a lot more schools, homes, roads etc. I know Japan is going through this, and certain intellectuals are upset about it, but I'm not sure the common folks are. The more I think about it though, I don't see a problem with a shrinking population. Anyone want to set me straight.

No its not a bad thing. Population reduction is necessary for the life of the planet. Humans are slowly destroying the world. The earth is merely a small farm with only enough acres and resources for a limited amount of farm animals to co exist. Once the max capacity has been breached the 'farms' crops/resources/livestock will slowly and eventually deteriorate completely.

The same overpopulation disaster happened in ancient times. Turning a once fertile tropical Egypt into desert wasteland. The same results will happen in 'modern times' if affirmative action is not taken place.
This 'problem' needs to be taken care of before the giving mother planet is destroyed.
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Old 11-16-2013, 09:43 AM
 
189 posts, read 155,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
I read a little bit on demographics when I can find something. Its interesting that the natural assumption is that declines in population are always bad. I don't think governments like them because it means fewer taxpayers. I don't think business likes it because it means fewer customers. But I guess there are some advantages to a declining population. Less need to use up natural resources. No need to build a lot more schools, homes, roads etc. I know Japan is going through this, and certain intellectuals are upset about it, but I'm not sure the common folks are. The more I think about it though, I don't see a problem with a shrinking population. Anyone want to set me straight.
shrinking population means trouble if this was nation wide it would spell disaster companys woul close and taxes go down its already shrinking there not telling you anything did you see the article where half the nation pays taxes the other half dosent
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Old 11-16-2013, 10:19 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,900 posts, read 58,020,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delta5ply10 View Post
shrinking population means trouble
if this was nation wide it would spell disaster
companys woul close and taxes go down
What if the portion of the population that did the shrinking...
was the same portion that isn't working or paying taxes?

The same portion who consumes 3-5 times in public services as the rest?
The same portion who consumes 20-30 times in public services than they'll ever pay in taxes?

Does that mean trouble for anyone? Spell disaster? Would that cause companies to close?
I'll say no to all three. But I sure bet that taxes could go down. Is that a problem?
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Old 11-16-2013, 10:48 AM
 
8,301 posts, read 3,469,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delta5ply10 View Post
shrinking population means trouble if this was nation wide it would spell disaster companys woul close and taxes go down its already shrinking there not telling you anything did you see the article where half the nation pays taxes the other half dosent
An expanding population is one positive factor in the value and security of the USD. More people, more future production and demands for the USD. Both at home and abroad.
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Old 11-16-2013, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,153,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munna21977 View Post
We need more people to spend more money in the economy. Rent, Food, Transportation, Insurance, Services. More people-better.
I don't get this view. More people results in bigger GDP numbers but it doesn't make people better off as individuals. If you own a business you get more customers but you also get more competition in providing those goods and services.

An increasing population mostly makes people worse off. A bigger population results in more people chasing after limited resources (land, water, gas, natural gas, housing, etc.), and as a result a higher cost of living and lower quality of life.

Of course, a declining population would pose problems for Social Security, but I would gladly pay more into Social Security to avoid importing a bunch of uneducated people from third world countries who pay less in taxes and receive welfare at a disproportionate rate.

If our population leveled off or started slowly declining, I would be ecstatic. Where I live now is extremely overpopulated. Traffic is a freaking nightmare. You have to wait in line everywhere you go. Crime is bad. The air is dirty. Rent is sky high. People are rude. There's no natural beauty left. I would rather not turn the rest of the country into miserable, polluted, overpopulated places like this one is.
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Old 11-16-2013, 12:02 PM
 
8,301 posts, read 3,469,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneOnegin View Post
I don't get this view. More people results in bigger GDP numbers but it doesn't make people better off as individuals. If you own a business you get more customers but you also get more competition in providing those goods and services.

An increasing population mostly makes people worse off. A bigger population results in more people chasing after limited resources (land, water, gas, natural gas, housing, etc.), and as a result a higher cost of living and lower quality of life.

Of course, a declining population would pose problems for Social Security, but I would gladly pay more into Social Security to avoid importing a bunch of uneducated people from third world countries who pay less in taxes and receive welfare at a disproportionate rate.

If our population leveled off or started slowly declining, I would be ecstatic. Where I live now is extremely overpopulated. Traffic is a freaking nightmare. You have to wait in line everywhere you go. Crime is bad. The air is dirty. Rent is sky high. People are rude. There's no natural beauty left. I would rather not turn the rest of the country into miserable, polluted, overpopulated places like this one is.
Your personal assessment is but one anecdote. But the overall reality of the economy and nature of the nation may different.

More people means more consumers and this means more demands and sales. And if you're smart in business you meet those increased demands and expand your business. If you don't some one will come in and compete. Maybe not good for you but good for the people and the more general economy.

Indeed if there are choke points like a lack of local water, parts of, or the whole system can get in trouble. So far we have met these barriers. I live on the Colorado River.

In our monetarily sovereign system declining population should be no real problem related to our money per se. But will remain as always a problem of goods and services. That is how much in the way of real goods and services the future young are willing to transfer to the elderly.

Where I live we could use more people. We lost many in 2008, mostly housing and construction related. More people would mean more business and growth. More traffic for us means next to nothing. One reason we moved from Chicago many years ago. We all have a few extra hours of personal life per day!
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Old 11-16-2013, 12:09 PM
 
996 posts, read 1,345,001 times
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No, it is not. More resources for the people here.
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