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Old 02-22-2019, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,760 posts, read 61,347,888 times
Reputation: 28871

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiganGreg View Post
I have noticed an interesting dichotomy in the 'brick and mortar' places. The last few times I have visited Sears, and many other retail stores, when asking if they had such and such product, they answer 'no, but we can order it for you online.'.

Are you serious?? Really???

Sears seems to be devoid of anything worth going to them for, and it never used to be like that. I LOVED that store....not now. Why even bother to drive there for a half hour and have them order it, when you can order it from Amazon from home, saving the cost of time and gas? Retail is going obsolete due to their own economics. If I could purchase anything by simply going to a store and purchasing it, I would. But they won't let me, so my online purchases are increasing. I refuse to feel bad for those that shoot themselves in the feet, then complain bitterly about how retail is not working any more.
Are there some sears stores still open someplace? I thought they were all gone now.
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Old 02-22-2019, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,760 posts, read 61,347,888 times
Reputation: 28871
Quote:
Originally Posted by gen811 View Post
if we can only turn those worthless commercial real estates into actual livable units it would be great success in our economy.
but they want to keep prices up. so that would never happen

the most crowded cities have so many vacant commercial real estate? and they still keep prices of them sky high so people cannot open businesses easily...
my bet is they charge at least 5000 to 10000 even though they are vacant they would rather eat the cost than lower the prices.

perhaps we need to tax them more for each vacant lot like I suggested so many times.

vacant lots are an eye sore, fire and criminal hazard. thus increasing costs to our environment.
the rich people holding those properties need to be fined for keeping them empty, thus endangering everyone around the property.
In Detroit they are turning most of the old office buildings into apartments, condos and hotels. They usually have a waiting list and crazy rental prices. The empty retail places are slowly filling back in as well. Mostly restaurants and taverns, but some specialty retail is popping back up. Also convenience stores. Lots of service type businesses. (Eye and glasses clinics, puppetry, tours, some locations are used temporarily for various businesses depending on the events that are taking place in the City. A big chunk of the retail area on one building near my office was a roller rink for a while. It was busy, but i am not sure whether it is still there. The covered up the windows.

And Yes, there are still building new retail locations in the City. They believe as more and more people move back downtown, there will be demand for retail. If not, they can always make more bars and restaurants.
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Old 02-22-2019, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,306 posts, read 48,525,551 times
Reputation: 18474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
... gun shop (I do not think you can mail guns and ammo).
Sure you can.

In our town, the only store front business is a gun smith.

He receives firearms in the mail all the time.
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Boston
6,275 posts, read 1,851,192 times
Reputation: 4560
homeless shelters
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Old 03-04-2019, 03:44 PM
 
50 posts, read 8,953 times
Reputation: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
What will become of all the empty retail buildings? Is there a future for physical presence in retail beyond cheap commodity products for low and modest income families?

Probably no future. We had a Kmart close 25 years ago....building is still empty. There was a Kroger next to it, closed about 12 years later....still empty. Buildings can't hardly be worth the property taxes at this point.
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Old 03-05-2019, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,333 posts, read 5,016,229 times
Reputation: 3178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tn_eddy View Post
Probably no future. We had a Kmart close 25 years ago....building is still empty. There was a Kroger next to it, closed about 12 years later....still empty. Buildings can't hardly be worth the property taxes at this point.
That is the problem. These buildings often sit in prominent locations in communities for years. Many are too large for anything other than the same type of business that once occupied it. Reclassifying the space for warehousing, housing, or industrial use is not always possible without hurting existing businesses.

The proliferation of on-line retailing is rapidly changing retail space in many communities. Some areas have gained large warehouses to support on-line demands but many communities are facing significant losses in property taxes as the shuttered businesses assessed values drop and physical activity and employment is reduced in many areas. Many states tax on-line sales but the revenue received largely fails to make it down to the local level. This results in more property taxes falling on homeowners and the surviving businesses. Property taxes/municipal funding will need to evolve. This is a problem that will become an important issue in the near future as costs in many communities across the country continue to rise and municipalities face challenges in funding schools, existing programs and infrastructure essential to the residents that reside in these communities.
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Old Today, 10:49 AM
Status: "US Dream Tracker : 68%" (set 17 days ago)
 
3,621 posts, read 1,884,224 times
Reputation: 3070
Storage warehouses, schools and residential subdivisions.
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