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Old 08-16-2017, 09:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
Except in the U.S. northeast that is.
Quite true again, except in the U.S. northeast.
Where in the northeast? In Massachusetts, the electrical generation plants were mostly converted to natural gas. It causes issues in the winter because of limited pipeline capacity. My electricity and natural gas bills both have seasonal transportation surcharges from all the NIMBY people opposing expansion of natural gas pipeline infrastructure. A quick Google says 66% natural gas, 5.8% coal. The Pilgrim nuke plant is still in operation. Here's a link to energy sources in the state: https://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=MA Gasoline and oil are significant but natural gas is bigger.

In my Vermont place, I heat with propane. My electricity comes from Quebec Hydro.
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Old 08-16-2017, 10:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I think that people in this thread are forgetting that gasoline for passenger cars is only a fraction of petroleum use. In most of the other applications, it competes against natural gas which is dirt cheap because of all the fracking. Unlike oil which ships easily in supertankers, it's tough to ship CNG/LNG around so the US domestic natural gas prices isn't impacted much by global markets.

Nobody uses petroleum to generate electricity in the US. That was common 30 years ago. It's very rare to see an office or industrial building heated by oil. Everyone has shifted to natural gas since it's cheaper. I don't know many people with homes where natural gas is in the street who heat with oil. Anyone who can easily shift from oil to natural gas has done it.

Layer on top of that the energy efficiency of everything in 2017 compared to 30 years ago. Houses are insulated better and have more efficient heating systems. Automobiles are far more efficient to the point that the Federal gasoline tax is insufficient to fund highway infrastructure projects.

If oil prices doubled, it wouldn't impact my life much. I don't use oil for heating. I have a very efficient car. I only drive 15,000 to 20,000 miles per year.
In our life, the specter of high gasoline prices affected any long road trip more than anything. We ski a lot, so in 2011 it became quite important. There were times where it was close to or maybe even cheaper to fly.

With a new ski truck we get 100% better gas mileage now, and that certainly helps.

And with roof solar, our electric bills are the same as 30 years ago, still in the same house.
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Old 08-16-2017, 11:13 AM
Status: "Christine Blasi Ford, Novelist and fiction author" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: New York Area
13,499 posts, read 5,264,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Where in the northeast? In Massachusetts, the electrical generation plants were mostly converted to natural gas. It causes issues in the winter because of limited pipeline capacity. My electricity and natural gas bills both have seasonal transportation surcharges from all the NIMBY people opposing expansion of natural gas pipeline infrastructure. A quick Google says 66% natural gas, 5.8% coal. The Pilgrim nuke plant is still in operation. Here's a link to energy sources in the state: https://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=MA Gasoline and oil are significant but natural gas is bigger.

In my Vermont place, I heat with propane. My electricity comes from Quebec Hydro.
I live 26 miles from New York City and we have a lot of oil trucks moving around. On checking, NYS has fewer oil-fired plants for generating electricity than I expected but still some. The competition with natural gas keeps a lid on prices.
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Old 09-02-2017, 08:36 PM
Status: "Christine Blasi Ford, Novelist and fiction author" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: New York Area
13,499 posts, read 5,264,853 times
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The short-term runup post-Harvey should reverse itself sharply. That is, if Irma doesn't screw things up further. But no price controls, no shortage (link).
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