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Old 07-10-2017, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Cannes
2,183 posts, read 1,255,842 times
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Not sure if you guys seen it but Walmart has been target with many lawsuits....selling meat with ammonia, labor laws infringement, faulty items etc etc...We live in a capitalistic for profit society, where sell more at lower price is the mantra...what a bout quality...and how to balance that?
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Old 07-11-2017, 05:43 AM
 
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At one point, WalMart had more than 3,000 actions for labor law violations pending against them -- in the state of Maine. In terms of sheer volume, WalMart has likely been the largest corporate criminal is US history.

But there is no inherent contradiction between quality and mass production.
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Old 07-11-2017, 06:18 AM
 
4,725 posts, read 2,255,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pub-911 View Post
But there is no inherent contradiction between quality and mass production.
Exactly. Factories can produce countless quality items if someone is willing to pay for them. How many CPUs has Intel churned out? How many knives has Henkel made?

Mass produced is not the same as poor quality.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Cannes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Exactly. Factories can produce countless quality items if someone is willing to pay for them. How many CPUs has Intel churned out? How many knives has Henkel made?

Mass produced is not the same as poor quality.
In theory yes but in practice it's more complex ...recently think of Takata airbags.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:24 AM
 
3,267 posts, read 2,336,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
Not sure if you guys seen it but Walmart has been target with many lawsuits....selling meat with ammonia, labor laws infringement, faulty items etc etc...We live in a capitalistic for profit society, where sell more at lower price is the mantra...what a bout quality...and how to balance that?
Walmart sells most of the same brands as the stores down the street. Not sure what production they do.

We have two very nice Walmarts near us and buy most of our groceries and produce there because it's fresher and less expensive. Just bought 3 dozen eggs that best by date is 6 weeks out. Bought the same brand at another store last week that had a best by date 10 days out.

I think in this case, the higher volume of sales allows Walmart to move products faster so the consumer wins with freshness and lower cost which equals better quality.

Our Walmarts pay better than similar jobs in the area. I have no problem with them.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:50 AM
 
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Keep in mind that "Use By" dates are basically for purposes of inventory control. They can be anywhere up to 45 days after the eggs were first packed into cartons, so assumptions about freshness may be a bit vague and tentative.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:50 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Fines and lawsuits are just part of the cost of doing business for big retailers. They cannot possibly control the conditions at all of their own facilities, never mind their many suppliers, foreign and domestic. When it comes to Walmart, we only buy name brand items that are significantly cheaper than other places, and prefer to avoid their produce and meat in favor of Costco and the local farmer's market.
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Old 07-11-2017, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
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Last I checked Walmart does not produce anything it sells. Mass production does not apply to Walmart's business plan. It only applies to companies that are doing business with or trying to do business with Walmart. Walmart has one of the best quality control departments in the nation. They can come into a place like Proctor & Gamble and request specific changes to the product. In fact the Walmart P&G products are a little different than other places. Paper towel products have a different size and the pattern on the paper and the artwork is even different. Quality control can tell a company to make changes or not accept the product.

So many companies want to have their products on Walmart shelves that they do anything to meet the needs that Walmart has set. There is a reason they are the biggest in the business.

Quality and Mass production work well together. When you refine what you are building and then put it on the production line you end up with a quality product. Look at Toyota or many other companies. In addition when a company makes a major blunder it effects them as well, yes, still look at Toyota. Car companies have recalls because they want to take care of a problem that will keep the consumer from buying the cars. Not saying that the cars are perfect but they are acceptable when it comes to what the consumer wants.

It is not always perfect to build a perfect car. Chances are mass production goes away when that happens and in time the car becomes more of a one off or limited production item, look to Rolls Royce for that. At one time they had the perfect engine, balanced, just amazing. The cars were hand made though making them difficult to fix and at times costly to repair. Not the best way to build a major brand, although exclusivity has its place in the world as well. Then again Rolls Royce had to be rescued by BMW to survive.
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Old 07-11-2017, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,316 posts, read 17,951,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
Walmart sells most of the same brands as the stores down the street. Not sure what production they do.

We have two very nice Walmarts near us and buy most of our groceries and produce there because it's fresher and less expensive. Just bought 3 dozen eggs that best by date is 6 weeks out. Bought the same brand at another store last week that had a best by date 10 days out.

I think in this case, the higher volume of sales allows Walmart to move products faster so the consumer wins with freshness and lower cost which equals better quality.

Our Walmarts pay better than similar jobs in the area. I have no problem with them.
They may sell the same brands, but they're not always selling the same products - even though the label is the same and the product looks the same.

WM can order enough volume that some manufacturers will make a special run just for Walmart that is a lower quality product so they can meet the lower price that Walmart will pay. There will be more plastic parts, there will be bushings instead of bearings, pressed metal instead of machined parts, etc. It may look the same, but it's a lower quality product. Not on all products, but if you do a really close comparison, you'll notice the difference. Sometimes it will be size of product, instead of quality, but in some cases, the WM version is not the same quality at all.

Even the comparison of a six weeks 'best buy' date versus a 10 day date. Obviously, one store will only sell fresh eggs and WM doesn't care. A 6 week 'best buy' date allows them to sell what the other store would consider a stale egg. They're still edible eggs, but they wouldn't really be considered "fresh" as in new anymore. They'd still be "fresh" as in not processed, though.

For freshness in eggs, unless they're dipping them in something - it used to be waterglass or some sort of oddball thing that isn't around anymore (we're talking pre-refrigeration for this sort of thing) two weeks unrefrigerated or four weeks refrigerated is about as long as I'd consider still 'fresh' although they're still edible. Fortunately, you can still eat them when they're stale. A fresh egg will have a yolk that stands tall and the whites have very little liquid whites around the edge. When cooked, they will have a more cake like texture and less of a rubbery texture. A stale egg will have a much flatter yolk and much more liquid around the whites. It will frequently break the yolk when cracked into a pan. Let's not even get into the color of the yolk, but that has more to do with the diet of the chicken and not the freshness of the eggs.

The way it works with eggs is a chicken will lay one egg at a time. They lay one about every 26 hours or so, it's a little bit less than one a day. Before a hen will set on eggs to hatch them, she needs to lay about a dozen which takes a little under two weeks. So pretty much a fertile egg can just sit there for two weeks and still be fresh. Adding in refrigeration you can double that to four weeks. Six weeks, though? And that's the date after you buy it?

Okay, figure there's an egg farm in Iowa and they've got 75,000 hens which is about 6,000 dozen per day. A semi truck can haul 18,000 dozen eggs. So it will take three days to lay enough eggs to fill a semi truck. Then the truck needs to go to a Walmart distribution center, figure another two days for that. Loading, driving & unloading. Now the eggs are five days old. They are in the distribution center for two days to be broken down into smaller amounts, sorted and sent out to individual Walmarts. Now the eggs are a week old when they leave the distribution center. Another 48 hours to load, transport and unload them to your local WM. Nine days old when they hit the local WM and then they add on a six week 'best by' date? Obviously, the 10 day 'best by' date is more reasonable if the store wants to sell fresh eggs that are actually fresh.

To see if your eggs are fresh, you can put them in water. A fresh egg will lay flat on the bottom of the container. An older egg will tip one end up. If it's standing on end, they're pretty stale but still edible. If they float, don't bother to use them, they'll be spoiled. If you boil a fresh egg, it will be hard to peel. If you boil and older egg, it will peel nicely.

In this case, we have huge commercial chicken farms who don't really put out a high quality product, not as high a quality as is possible. And then a huge retailer who doesn't help increase quality. WalMart is not known for quality products. Adequate, perhaps, but not quality.

Last edited by hotzcatz; 07-11-2017 at 12:24 PM..
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Old 07-11-2017, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
3,003 posts, read 1,695,130 times
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It's not mass production that's the problem, but rather cutting corners beyond the point of reason. I do think Wal-Mart encourages too extreme cost cutting among its suppliers in some cases.

I've had some bad experiences at Wal-Mart, and now will steer clear unless there's no alternative. There are plenty of other places to shop.
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