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Old 07-24-2017, 05:17 PM
 
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...but they'd rather wait until after the election to get serious about any of it.
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Old 07-25-2017, 07:05 AM
 
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This is not the politics forum.

Nafta sucks I don't care who is president. Is Mexico going to fight against US corn dumping?
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Old 07-25-2017, 07:28 AM
 
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The general elections in Mexico next June are an economic issue as long as it's NAFTA that is being discussed. Canada and the US break about even on goods and services, but there is a roughly $60 billion deficit with Mexico. How excited -- before or after their elections -- are Mexicans likely to be over one-sided attempts by "yankee imperialists" to drain $60 billion out of their economy? It's not such a hard question really. Here's a tougher one -- why has the US simply abandoned the notion of trade promotion of late? Increasing exports after all has the same effect on deficits as slashing imports.
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Old 07-25-2017, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
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Here are the objectives for the NAFTA renegotiation. It seems mostly to be a modernization of a 23 year old agreement. In fact, much of it seems to have been taken from the Obama Administration's TPP.

https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files...Objectives.pdf


From the document listed above:

Summary of Specific Negotiating Objectives for the Initiation of NAFTA Negotiations

Industrial Goods
  • Maintain existing reciprocal duty-free market access for industrial goods and strengthen disciplines to address non-tariff barriers that constrain U.S. exports to NAFTA countries.
  • Maintain existing duty-free access to NAFTA country markets for U.S. textile and apparel products and seek to improve competitive opportunities for exports of U.S. textile and apparel products while taking into account U.S. import sensitivities.
  • Promote greater regulatory compatibility with respect to key goods sectors to reduce burdens associated with unnecessary differences in regulation, including through regulatory cooperation where appropriate.

Agricultural Goods
  • Maintain existing reciprocal duty-free market access for agricultural goods.
  • Expand competitive market opportunities for U.S. agricultural goods in NAFTA countries, substantially equivalent to the competitive opportunities afforded foreign exports into the U.S. market, by reducing or eliminating remaining tariffs.
  • Seek to eliminate non-tariff barriers to U.S. agricultural exports including discriminatory barriers, restrictive administration of tariff rate quotas, other unjustified measures that unfairly limit access to markets for U.S. goods, such as cross subsidization, price discrimination, and price undercutting.
  • Provide reasonable adjustment periods for U. S. import sensitive agricultural products, engaging in close consultation with Congress on such products before initiating tariff reduction negotiations.
  • Promote greater regulatory compatibility to reduce burdens associated with unnecessary differences in regulation, including through regulatory cooperation where appropriate.

Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS):
  • Provide for enforceable SPS obligations that build upon WTO rights and obligations, including with respect to science based measures, good regulatory practice, import checks, equivalence, and regionalization, making clear that each country can set for itself the level of protection it believes to be appropriate to protect food safety, and plant and animal health in a manner consistent with its international obligations.
  • Establish a mechanism to resolve expeditiously unwarranted barriers that block the export of U.S. food and agricultural products.
  • Establish new and enforceable rules to ensure that science-based SPS measures are developed and implemented in a transparent, predictable, and non-discriminatory manner.
  • Improve communication, consultation, and cooperation between governments to share information and work together on SPS issues in a transparent manner, including on new technologies.
  • Provide for a mechanism for improved dialogue and cooperation to address SPS issues and facilitate trade where appropriate and possible.


Customs, Trade Facilitation, and Rules of Origin:

Customs and Trade Facilitation:
  • Build on and set high standards for implementation of WTO agreements involving trade facilitation and customs valuation.
  • Increase transparency by ensuring that all customs laws, regulations, and procedures are published on the Internet as well as designating points of contact for questions from traders.
  • Ensure that, to the greatest extent possible, shipments are released immediately after determining compliance with applicable laws and regulations and provide for new disciplines on timing of release, automation, and use of guarantees.
  • Provide for streamlined and expedited customs treatment for express delivery shipments, including for shipments above any de minimis threshold. Provide for a de minimis shipment value comparable to the U.S. de minimis shipment value of $800.
  • Ensure that NAFTA countries administer customs penalties in an impartial and transparent manner, and avoid conflicts of interest in the administration of penalties.
  • Provide for automation of import, export, and transit processes, including through supply chain integration; reduced import, export, and transit forms, documents, and formalities; enhanced harmonization of customs data requirements; and advance rulings regarding the treatment that will be provided to a good at the time of importation.
  • Provide for both administrative and judicial appeal of customs decisions.
  • Provide for electronic payment of duties, taxes, fees, and charges imposed on or in connection with importation or exportation.
  • Provide for the use of risk management systems for customs control and post-clearance audit procedures to ensure compliance with customs and related laws.
  • Provide for disciplines on the use of customs brokers, preshipment inspection, and the use of reusable containers.
  • Establish a committee for Parties to share information and cooperate on trade priorities with a view to resolving inconsistent treatment of commercial goods.

Rules of Origin:
  • Update and strengthen the rules of origin, as necessary, to ensure that the benefits of NAFTA go to products genuinely made in the United States and North America.
  • Ensure the rules of origin incentivize the sourcing of goods and materials from the United States and North America.
  • Establish origin procedures that streamline the certification and verification of rules of origin and that promote strong enforcement, including with respect to textiles.
  • Promote cooperation with NAFTA countries to ensure that goods that meet the rules of origin receive NAFTA benefits, prevent duty evasion, and combat customs offences.


Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT):
  • Require NAFTA countries to apply decisions and recommendations adopted by the WTO TBT Committee that apply, inter alia, to standards, conformity assessment, transparency, and other areas.
  • Include strong provisions on transparency and public consultation that require the NAFTA countries to publish drafts of technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures, allow stakeholders in other countries to provide comments on those drafts, and require authorities to address significant issues raised by stakeholders and explain how the final measure achieves the stated objectives.
  • Ensure national treatment of conformity assessment bodies without conditions or limitations and encourage the use of international conformity assessment recognition arrangements to facilitate the acceptance of conformity assessment results.
  • Establish an active TBT Chapter Committee that will discuss bilateral and third party specific trade concerns, coordination of regional and multilateral activities, regulatory cooperation, and implementing Good Regulatory Practices.


Good Regulatory Practices:
  • Obtain commitments that can facilitate market access and promote greater compatibility among U.S., Canadian, and Mexican regulations, including by:
  •  Ensuring transparency and accountability in the development, implementation, and review of regulations, including by publication of proposed regulations;
  •  Providing meaningful opportunities for public comment in the development of regulations;
  •  Promoting the use of impact assessments and other methods of ensuring regulations are evidence-based and current, as well as avoiding unnecessary redundancies; and
  •  Applying other good regulatory practices.

The list goes on.
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Old 07-26-2017, 06:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Here are the objectives for the NAFTA renegotiation. It seems mostly to be a modernization of a 23 year old agreement. In fact, much of it seems to have been taken from the Obama Administration's TPP.
Mexico and Canada participated in TPP negotiations. TPP was of course an international blueprint for dealing with the continued emergence of China as a global trade power. The rug was unwisely pulled out from under that initiative, but no one has forgotten the concessions that our neighbors had been willing to make at the time. It is more than a little ironic though for Trump forces to have so hated TPP then, and yet to promote so much of the same language with respect to NAFTA today. It's almost as if they don't really have an actual plan here other than to make angry faces and intone the knee-jerk politicisms of the day. But make no mistake -- the White House did signal last week its inapt focus on trade balances and its intent to go after Mexico as the result. This again is not a plan that portends of much success. But maybe Putin at some point said something nice about it or whatever.
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Old 07-26-2017, 09:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madison999 View Post
This is not the politics forum.

Nafta sucks I don't care who is president. Is Mexico going to fight against US corn dumping?
They had to eliminate their subsidies while the US retained theirs. This was covered in EPTimes as a major cause of illegal immigration to the US from the southern states as subsistence farming collapsed.

It's essentially a pass-thru destination for Asia and Germany. They run a surplus with the US but it comes at the expense of deficits with the real US trade partners. It reduces costs by bypassing the ports on the West Coast.
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
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Originally Posted by Pub-911 View Post
It is more than a little ironic though for Trump forces to have so hated TPP then, and yet to promote so much of the same language with respect to NAFTA today.
The employees who create such documents are career employees rather than political appointees, are they not? Not too surprising. There is certainly some populist rant in the preamble of the document -- but once you get to actual negotiating objectives, I didn't find much that anyone who passed Econ 401 would find massively objectionable.

Do you see line items that jump out as being objectionable?
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Old 07-27-2017, 02:22 PM
 
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Is there such a thing as a bad trade deal to the left?
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Old 07-28-2017, 07:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Do you see line items that jump out as being objectionable?
Already noted above.
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Old 07-28-2017, 07:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madison999 View Post
Is there such a thing as a bad trade deal to the left?
To the left? How about just to people with a grain of sense who can see through the gossamer veils of protectionist propaganda? The objective of trade deals is to assure and smooth the flow of trade between groups of people. A bad trade deal would be one that made such trade more difficult.
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