U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-10-2017, 05:38 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,720,491 times
Reputation: 8928

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pub-911 View Post
They should bulldoze it all and build a mix of shacks, shanties, and dilapidated tenements. Housing costs would almost surely become much more affordable.

Homeowners would never allow such a thing. Incumbent homeowners are often THE greatest force opposing housing affordability. Ire against 'greedy' landlords is misdirected; landlords can do only what an insufficiently-supplied and/or overly-regulated market allows them to do. By creating an intermediate layer between themselves and the market, homeowners get to rig the market without taking the deserved blame.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-10-2017, 05:41 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,720,491 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pub-911 View Post
The worst of all possible worlds would have no zoning ordinances.

And envious whiners have no natural or otherwise justifiable claims of entitlement to live anywhere they like, or dine anywhere they like, or vacation anywhere they like, or to have or enjoy any number of other things counted among the finer things in life. Equality of outcome isn't supposed to be in your playbook. Rip that page out right now.

Yeah, Houston is a terrible place to live.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2017, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,456 posts, read 5,091,915 times
Reputation: 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Yeah, Houston is a terrible place to live.
There are still private deed restrictions, HOAs and city codes, e.g. parking minimums, that replicate zoning but yes on the whole there is less regulation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2017, 06:21 AM
 
4,229 posts, read 1,906,546 times
Reputation: 3782
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Yeah, Houston is a terrible place to live.
Houston has already been laughed at above and also earlier this week...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pub-911 View Post
Ah, Houston -- the darling of the corporate-funded hard right-wing. But while the city famously lacks anything they choose to call zoning laws, it has plenty of decentralized codes and ordinances that while shying away from out-and-out land-use restrictions still do very much the same sorts of things that actual zoning does. What Houston enjoys then are nearly all of the burdens and restrictions of zoning without any of the benefits that would have accrued from a top-down comprehensive plan for the oversight and direction of progress and development in the region. This is part of the reason why Houston has become a crude hodge-podge that routinely appears near the top of lists of worst-designed US cities.
It was laughed at last year as well...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pub-911 View Post
Houston has de facto zoning through its voluminous land-use and related codes. These are why the city doesn't look any different from Dallas or any other sizable Sun Belt sorts of cities. There aren't any brothels next door to churches in Houston, and you can't put up a convenience store in a residential neighborhood either. If it quacks like a duck...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2017, 07:57 AM
 
15,387 posts, read 8,684,668 times
Reputation: 13775
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
No problem; in Michigan, overnight parking restrictions are the norm, usually 2a to 5a. You can have all the cars you want, you just can't park them on the street overnight. And private property parking is allowed only on driveways and in carports and garages, so there's no parking on the front or side lawn either.
You don't even live there. How could you possibly know what the "norm" is in Michigan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 02:54 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,720,491 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
You don't even live there. How could you possibly know what the "norm" is in Michigan.



Because I lived there for many years and it was the norm when I lived there? Parking restrictions are an integral part of social engineering; it's hard to imagine municipalities casually dispensing with them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 06:32 AM
 
4,229 posts, read 1,906,546 times
Reputation: 3782
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Because I lived there for many years and it was the norm when I lived there?
Maybe you could hitchhike back? There are certainly better housing situations that you could afford in Michigan these days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
12,685 posts, read 9,432,561 times
Reputation: 14942
For decades, urban liberalism has sold itself as a compact between government and taxpayers. The people paid, and with that revenue liberal politicians would deliver infrastructure, services, economic opportunity and civil order. But liberal governance, instead of keeping its side of the bargain, is at a dead end.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 12:28 PM
 
4,229 posts, read 1,906,546 times
Reputation: 3782
Looks like a garbage scow has broken loose from its P&OC moorings once again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 11:49 PM
 
16,493 posts, read 17,525,712 times
Reputation: 23556
Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
The title is part of a quote from a local city council member fretting about the shortage of naturally affordable and subsidized housing units within the city of Austin:

I believe that part of our role as a community and as a government is to provide protections against immoral market forces, said Council Member Greg Casar

https://www.austinmonitor.com/storie...t-segregation/

I find it interesting that he uses the term "immoral" and think it is very misleading mistaking the effect for the cause and then assigning some type of intention to parties involved in the housing market. I guess this kind of remark works with naive populists that are part of is his base, sort of a mirror image of what is happening on the other end of the political spectrum. I don't think it will work long term, but then again there is another council member, Ora Houston, here who referred to "supply and demand" as an adage. We will see if they get re-elected. Thoughts?

Da da da live breaking news


LIFE IS UNFAIR.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top