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View Poll Results: How bad will the debt ceiling recession be?
Early 90s S&L crisis 3 33.33%
2008 financial crisis 0 0%
The Great Depression 0 0%
We will be in uncharted territory 6 66.67%
Voters: 9. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-10-2017, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
2,773 posts, read 1,219,983 times
Reputation: 5095

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If we default, then Putin can put a master strategist mark by his name. A true default would be horrid as it would destroy the underpinnings of the world economy.

So, like nuclear war, it needs to go in the....it won't happen category. Literally if a Congress were to put the country into default they should all be taken out and shot for treason.
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:23 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,740,810 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by MLSFan View Post
guess they better arm the IRS and have them jail the student loan debtors until they pay up



Did you know that government makes a ton of money on student loan defaulters? Because they have broad collection powers, including garnishing wages and Social Security payments, PLUS tacking on steep fees.

Ironically, it's the student loan debtors NOT in default who are skating without paying - but since they are NOT in default, the government can't collect from them.
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:37 AM
 
4,229 posts, read 1,909,438 times
Reputation: 3787
How much is "a ton of money?" In the world you so regularly report and litter with a ton of pointless smileys, twenty bucks would be near a fortune.
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Old 08-12-2017, 09:21 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,740,810 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pub-911 View Post
How much is "a ton of money?" In the world you so regularly report and litter with a ton of pointless smileys, twenty bucks would be near a fortune.

Last numbers I've seen suggest it's tens of billions of dollars annually - even my minimum wage paycheck was garnished until I consolidated my student loans. The added steep fees meant I was merely treading water as opposed to actually paying off the loans.

Now, instead of having more than $100 vacuumed out of my paychecks every month, I qualify for a nice, affordable monthly payment of zero. That's government for you.
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Old 08-12-2017, 11:30 AM
 
4,229 posts, read 1,909,438 times
Reputation: 3787
When were these numbers actually seen by you, and who was the source of them?

No one cares by the way about any of your imagined universe of personal problems, excepting perhaps for your annoying addiction to the use of pointless smileys.
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