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Old 09-02-2017, 12:58 PM
 
8,285 posts, read 3,456,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Every working person in the US contributes to medicare. And all the premiums I and most people have been paying for health coverage (and secondary health coverage once they get on medicare) have paid. The last I heard, Cigna and United Health care are still making a profit, and Medicare is supposed to be solvent for another 12 to 15 years. The problem is not the ACA it is health care costs and the cost of drugs in the US. Why should 23 days in the hospital cost $327K? I didn't have any surgery, just monitoring and meds and a couple of chest tubes to remove fluid. Why should chemo cost $6K to 9K a week in an outpatient setting? Inflation has increased the price of most things 10X in the past 40 years. But simple medical procedures, or even occupying a bed where nothing is done other than check your vitals once an hour has gone up 100X. In countries where there is socialized medicine, they put a cap on earnings for doctors and hospitals. A doctor can make $150K a year and work normal hours and days. They don't become millionaires. And hospital beds in a shared room don't cost more than the presidential suite at a first class hotel.
Anyone that pays a federal tax contributes to Medicare.

Any way you look at it, 23 hospital days is big money, basically catastrophic and not common.

Was the $367K the charges, what you or your insurance actually paid?

I ask because our accident bills were about $1.3M. Actually paid by us and Obamacare about $200K.

Properly planned and long term, one can easily become a millionaire on $150K a year.
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Old 09-03-2017, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
10,638 posts, read 3,314,105 times
Reputation: 12748
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Every working person in the US contributes to medicare. And all the premiums I and most people have been paying for health coverage (and secondary health coverage once they get on medicare) have paid. The last I heard, Cigna and United Health care are still making a profit, and Medicare is supposed to be solvent for another 12 to 15 years. The problem is not the ACA it is health care costs and the cost of drugs in the US. Why should 23 days in the hospital cost $327K? I didn't have any surgery, just monitoring and meds and a couple of chest tubes to remove fluid. Why should chemo cost $6K to 9K a week in an outpatient setting? Inflation has increased the price of most things 10X in the past 40 years. But simple medical procedures, or even occupying a bed where nothing is done other than check your vitals once an hour has gone up 100X. In countries where there is socialized medicine, they put a cap on earnings for doctors and hospitals. A doctor can make $150K a year and work normal hours and days. They don't become millionaires. And hospital beds in a shared room don't cost more than the presidential suite at a first class hotel.
And this is my point exactly! Why is s hospital allowed to charge $50 for a Tylenol when s bottle of it at the store is $6? The reform needed isn't exactly healthcare itself, but caps need to be placed on what these doctors and hospitals can charge as well as what pharmaceutical companies can charge to medicine. They are all make insanely huge profits over the welfare of individuals. Especially ordering unnecessary tests!
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Old 09-03-2017, 08:47 AM
 
8,285 posts, read 3,456,454 times
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Originally Posted by CGab View Post
And this is my point exactly! Why is s hospital allowed to charge $50 for a Tylenol when s bottle of it at the store is $6? The reform needed isn't exactly healthcare itself, but caps need to be placed on what these doctors and hospitals can charge as well as what pharmaceutical companies can charge to medicine. They are all make insanely huge profits over the welfare of individuals. Especially ordering unnecessary tests!
Hospital charges are not prices paid.

Bills are intentionally inflated to help them with their ongoing push for higher reimbursements.

Most hospital bills are bundled and pre-negotiated with third parties. So the hospital can charge all they want for a Tylenol, but are paid based on diagnosis or service. Like Medicare DRG payments.

A hospital bill may be $100K, but actual payment much less. Less than half not unusual at all.

Our own recent huge bills were paid at a very low rate. $1.2M, Obamacare paid about $200K.

Also with doctor fees, as most are preset by third parties.

Unnecessary testing is a whole other ballgame.
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