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Old 10-26-2018, 12:10 AM
 
5,727 posts, read 2,592,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
If a bird has been killed off by humans, and their habitat destroyed and birds sent off to live in zoo then eventually when one sees what has been going on then the market does intervene. This attitude is what's leading to mass extension of species when one only thinks about themselves, and forget that everything one has comes from someone else at some point.
Lol!
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Old 10-26-2018, 12:41 AM
 
8,748 posts, read 7,720,728 times
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Portland city, and Washington County have done a lot to keep developers from being able to build.

They don't want to change the area around the cities and convert farms, into residential development. With limited areas to build, they have driven land prices where they allow development through the roof. Getting a subdivision approved is a long and expensive process

So rather than develop housing there, they do it someplace else, where it is easier and cheaper to develop and build.

This has caused a big housing shortage, and rapidly accelerating home prices and rents have soared.

As for affordable rentals, the attitude there is "Not in my neighborhood".
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Old 10-26-2018, 01:43 AM
 
31 posts, read 11,824 times
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maybe market failure to create more jobs and the ripple effect
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Old 10-26-2018, 10:23 AM
 
7,493 posts, read 6,944,268 times
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Millenials will be moving to the suburbs

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/ar...ic-development

The median age of the Millenial cohort will be at homebuying age by 2023.
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:58 AM
 
168 posts, read 417,732 times
Reputation: 131
The concept that there is a shortage of housing is puzzling . . .

According to Statista, there were about 140 million total residential units in the US in 2017 and about 125 million total households - about 15 million empty housing units available on any given day.

The national economy is dynamic. There are many midwestern cities that by today's standards appear wildly overbuilt.
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Old 10-28-2018, 01:49 PM
 
26,321 posts, read 50,938,037 times
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^^^ Exactly...

Even going back a few years to 2009-12 the headlines were the glut of housing and vacant homes on every block... homes no one wants.

Some can't see the forst from the trees.

On another tangent...

It seems the SF Bay Area is ground zero for housing arson... huge projects years in the making go up in flames just as the framing is complete... the social media gives thumbs up and kudos... saying we don't want or need gentrificaiton... congratulations urban warriors...

Just think the message this sends... one builder said they are done... their costs for insurance has gone up 10 fold... they have hi tech cameras and security with over height perimeter fencing...

It all begs the question of why?
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Old 11-12-2018, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
5,190 posts, read 4,897,619 times
Reputation: 4244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Believe me... I have thought about taking up the life of Stealth Rabbit... kind of a vagabond on my own terms with strategic barns around the country to drop in at...
Did it for 13 years. Highly recommend it...
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:35 AM
 
7,493 posts, read 6,944,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doggz3 View Post
The concept that there is a shortage of housing is puzzling . . .

According to Statista, there were about 140 million total residential units in the US in 2017 and about 125 million total households - about 15 million empty housing units available on any given day.

The national economy is dynamic. There are many midwestern cities that by today's standards appear wildly overbuilt.
They count apartments. There has been an apartment construction boom since 2010.

apartments

Construction of other homes has lagged plus many more would've been available if the shadow inventory had been allowed to work itself off. There is also the 10+7 real estate cycle where it takes about 7 years for credits to repair after a wave of foreclosures in the previous bust. It should swing the other way toward for-sale construction as the next wave of 30-somethings occur. There are online charts that map the relationship between population cohorts and apartment construction peaks and valleys.
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Old 11-14-2018, 03:06 PM
 
3,860 posts, read 3,856,684 times
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Quote:
The concept that there is a shortage of housing is puzzling . . .

According to Statista, there were about 140 million total residential units in the US in 2017 and about 125 million total households - about 15 million empty housing units available on any given day.
You realize that the US is a big place, and it doesn't matter if there 100 spare houses in Detroit or New Mexico if there are no jobs there.



It's like saying "there are a few billionaires in the US, so why are people homeless"? Because houses, jobs, and money are not allocated on a per-capita basis.
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Old 11-14-2018, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
5,190 posts, read 4,897,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
it doesn't matter if there 100 spare houses in Detroit or New Mexico if there are no jobs there.
So true, but it isn't as quite that bad. There are plenty of places where a person can find good employment and housing is reasonable. If you are moving to an area where demand is very high, then of course you should expect a tight supply and high prices. This has been the case forever.

The OPs mistaken premise is that high demand for cheap housing in popular areas would be naturally filled by a free market. It's only because of zoning getting in the way that there is a problem. Do you see a flaw in that logic?
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