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Old 11-22-2017, 04:53 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,708,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLSFan View Post
Those are the people I am talking about...

why are you limiting them to a life time of $8/hr? Why do you not think that they can learn skills that get them paid more? that they are intelligent and motivated enough to not earn $10/hr, $15/hr, $20/hr, $X/hr over time?

I'm talking about people whom the labor market limits them to say $8 per hour.
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:06 PM
 
9,082 posts, read 3,697,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
I'm talking about people whom the labor market limits them to say $8 per hour.
stop placing artificial limits on people

people grow, that's what living things do
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Old 11-22-2017, 06:56 PM
 
11,891 posts, read 14,355,740 times
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One should not overlook the government's role in forcing up housing costs. The single largest cost of building a home is the land. When zoning laws dictate that you must use a minimum of 10,000 square feet that increases the cost. Then there are the fees. The City, School District, Water and Sewage District, and every other government body wants its cut. They can add up to tens of thousands. Of course, local building code amendments also add up.
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:17 PM
 
25,800 posts, read 49,685,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
California homeowners decided that "first movers" should be secure in their homes and not priced out by newcomers - so they passed Prop 13.

Why shouldn't first movers who rent have similar protection from being priced out by newcomers?
Please realize Prop 13 only passed because if garnered support of non homeowners... simply not enough homeowners in the State to make it law.

In addition the negatives from Sacramento were non-stop... it still passed and I am grateful each and everyday because in 30 to 40 years I fully intend to be the one on the block with lower taxes.
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:19 PM
 
9,082 posts, read 3,697,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
The City, School District, Water and Sewage District, and every other government body wants its cut. They can add up to tens of thousands. Of course, local building code amendments also add up.
the people moving there expect those "government" bodies to provide service... why shouldn't they get their share of taxes?

if someone wanted to live without a school district, no sewage system, no water system, no electrical system, no safety requirements; they can move to an off grid area for fairly cheap. Pay for the people to bring supplies to them, because there is no/little road infrastructure (since they don't want to pay the taxes for it)
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:30 PM
 
25,800 posts, read 49,685,561 times
Reputation: 19248
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
California homeowners decided that "first movers" should be secure in their homes and not priced out by newcomers - so they passed Prop 13.

Why shouldn't first movers who rent have similar protection from being priced out by newcomers?
Please realize Prop 13 only passed because if garnered support of non homeowners... simply not enough homeowners in the State to make it law.

In addition the negatives from Sacramento were non-stop... it still passed and I am grateful each and everyday because in 30 to 40 years I fully intend to be the one on the block with lower taxes.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:15 PM
 
6,308 posts, read 4,765,469 times
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It's cobweb theory (google it). It takes longer to zone for a housing development, fulfill the environmental regulations, build the houses, and rent or sell the houses than it does for a company to add 14,000 workers. So there's a lag between demand for housing and the supply of housing. Result: price goes up, bringing additional supply into the market but not right away.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:23 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,708,082 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Please realize Prop 13 only passed because if garnered support of non homeowners... simply not enough homeowners in the State to make it law.

In addition the negatives from Sacramento were non-stop... it still passed and I am grateful each and everyday because in 30 to 40 years I fully intend to be the one on the block with lower taxes.
Howard Jarvis lied to renters when he said that Prop 13 would deliver lower rents, plus the renter demographic is younger than the homeowner demographic - in this country, many poor people buy into the fantasy that they can be rich/wealthy/homeowners one day. Some do, some don't, but the rich/wealthy/homeowners retain their political favors.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:30 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,708,082 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
It's cobweb theory (google it). It takes longer to zone for a housing development, fulfill the environmental regulations, build the houses, and rent or sell the houses than it does for a company to add 14,000 workers. So there's a lag between demand for housing and the supply of housing. Result: price goes up, bringing additional supply into the market but not right away.

In this case, the "new" workers are largely highly-paid in tech jobs - the low-wage workers generally were there first and were displaced by the higher-paid new arrivals. So why can't the newbies wait for the additional supply that is brought into the market but not right away?
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Old 11-23-2017, 05:40 AM
 
5,598 posts, read 4,204,310 times
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In the NYC area, there were plenty of "projects". These were expensive mistakes that cost a lot of taxpayer money and resulted in some of the world's worst crime and poor living conditions. No one wants to see more of those. Certainly no middle class neighborhood wants to see the decay that resulted. There is not a whole lot of support for public supported, low income housing.


Now, let us consider privately funded, low income housing. Yuck, who in their right mind wants to be a landlord for low income housing? Being a landlord has somehow become a dirty word. Laws protect the tenants. There are often rent controls and difficulties evicting a deadbeat tenant. Property values can drop when low income areas become slums.
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