U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-22-2017, 03:05 PM
 
Location: la la land
27,422 posts, read 11,491,506 times
Reputation: 19395

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim1921 View Post
Arithmetic is a branch of math. Your clarification is not necessary.

Secondly, some birth control should not be OTC. Many consumers do not read labels. Oral contraceptives (and other hormone containing contraceptives), for example, should not be taken by women who smoke. They are also contraindicated in patients with a history of a heart attack, stroke, coronary heart disease, history of blood clots, impaired liver function, known or suspected cancer of the breast or reproductive system.

Further, there are concerns as to OCís in patients that have severe headaches, hypertension, diabetes or strong family history of diabetes, gallbladder disease, acute mononucleosis, sickle cell disease and/or undiagnosed abnormal vaginal bleeding.

Access to contraceptives are not as hard as you make it out to be. If you donít have access to a clinic, you can call you county health department and they will direct you to resources. Further, if you look at the data, the bigger problem is patient compliance. When you look at prescription data, there is a big gap between new prescriptions and refills. That means we have a good number of patients that have received an initial prescription for a contraceptive, but then the refill rate drops off.
When is the last time you got your prescription for contraceptives Jim?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-22-2017, 03:08 PM
 
1,164 posts, read 530,600 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I can does math. If I bring home $12 an hour and work 40 hours a week, I should be bringing home $1920 per month. But my paycheck was only a little over $1400 per month. That figures out to be roughly 25% of my paycheck gone. Where? Well, I looked at my paycheck and that money went for taxes, federal taxes, state taxes, whatever.

Yes, I got "some" back when I filed. Certainly not $6000 a year, though. And when you're talking to someone who depends on the money they make from the hours they work, we don't care what the exemptions are or whether the state has tax or not. We only care about what we can put in the bank in dollars and cents. Period. Full stop.

I guess you missed the part where I said short form only and no deductions, making an even playing field. If higher income earners couldn't write off everything from soup to nuts, then I'd be convinced they were paying their fair share.
Higher income earners can't write off everything. They can write off state and local taxes, mortgage interest, and gifts to charities to the extent those items exceed the standard deduction of 6,350 for singles, and 12,700 for married couples, and not much more unless they have high medical bills, etc.

If you make $12 per hour and take no days off, you will earn $24,960 over 52 weeks. You will pay $1909 in social security and medicare tax, and your income tax would be $1,720 for the year. If you used one deduction for withholding, you will have had about $2,300 withheld for federal taxes, and would then get about $600 back when you file. Your effective income tax rate is 6.9%, social security and medicare is 7.65%, bringing your overall Federal taxes to about 14.5%.

For your hypothetical "wealthy" person who makes $120k, let's assume he is single and has no 401k or other item that would use pre-tax dollars, and rents an apartment, so no mortgage interest or property tax deduction, and lives in a no state income tax state. His Federal income amount would be $23,670, and his social security and medicare amount would be $9,180, for a total Federal tax of $32,850. His income tax rate would be 19.73%, and the total federal tax percentage would be 27.3%. From my own experience, if he has a reasonably normal mortgage and property taxes, his income tax rate would drop to about 16% with the extra deductions over the standard amount. I really don't think you can argue that higher earners don't pay their fair share.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 03:09 PM
 
440 posts, read 201,151 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
Are you taking that out of hand or have you tracked patients who move or otherwise come to have a new prescription from a new doctor?

And the bucket of reasons why closing PP clinics helps is still looking kind of empty.
You can even see it in the longitudinal data. If you donít have a planned parenthood, canít find a clinic, etc., just call your county health department. PP does not have a monopoly on servicing low income patients. The historic barrier in the past was cost, not access. Cost has been driven down substantially.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 03:11 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 1,729,349 times
Reputation: 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Not if they keep closing Planned Parenthood clinics down:


Oh, so you want to hold the poor to a higher standard than you hold yourself and others to. Well, why didn't you say so? I mean, only the rich deserve to drink a coke and smoke a cigarette and watch TV. That sounds about right.
this is the reason why Trump and the GOP are winning. is cable, cigarettes, liquor, soda necessary to live?


if you are poor do you still include the above items in your budget?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 03:57 PM
 
1,164 posts, read 530,600 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim1921 View Post
You can even see it in the longitudinal data. If you donít have a planned parenthood, canít find a clinic, etc., just call your county health department. PP does not have a monopoly on servicing low income patients. The historic barrier in the past was cost, not access. Cost has been driven down substantially.
These days access is the problem. It is nearly impossible for a poor person in many parts of Texas to find reproductive care, since the PP supported clinics were closed, and the State hasn't managed to find any substitutes, despite giving millions to organizations that faithfully promised to do so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 05:56 PM
 
440 posts, read 201,151 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
These days access is the problem. It is nearly impossible for a poor person in many parts of Texas to find reproductive care, since the PP supported clinics were closed, and the State hasn't managed to find any substitutes, despite giving millions to organizations that faithfully promised to do so.
if you are referring to contraception, reread what I wrote.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 06:04 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
3,996 posts, read 1,959,509 times
Reputation: 2485
Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
Higher income earners can't write off everything. They can write off state and local taxes, mortgage interest, and gifts to charities to the extent those items exceed the standard deduction of 6,350 for singles, and 12,700 for married couples, and not much more unless they have high medical bills, etc.

If you make $12 per hour and take no days off, you will earn $24,960 over 52 weeks. You will pay $1909 in social security and medicare tax, and your income tax would be $1,720 for the year. If you used one deduction for withholding, you will have had about $2,300 withheld for federal taxes, and would then get about $600 back when you file. Your effective income tax rate is 6.9%, social security and medicare is 7.65%, bringing your overall Federal taxes to about 14.5%.

For your hypothetical "wealthy" person who makes $120k, let's assume he is single and has no 401k or other item that would use pre-tax dollars, and rents an apartment, so no mortgage interest or property tax deduction, and lives in a no state income tax state. His Federal income amount would be $23,670, and his social security and medicare amount would be $9,180, for a total Federal tax of $32,850. His income tax rate would be 19.73%, and the total federal tax percentage would be 27.3%. From my own experience, if he has a reasonably normal mortgage and property taxes, his income tax rate would drop to about 16% with the extra deductions over the standard amount. I really don't think you can argue that higher earners don't pay their fair share.
i always found it counter-intuitive that if you are rich enough to afford paying for a house then the government considers it a deduction. but if you are too poor to afford a house then you cant deduct your rent.

there was an article a few years ago that many welfare programs would be paid for each year from the taxes not collected for mortgage interest and home improvement deductions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 06:09 PM
 
440 posts, read 201,151 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
When is the last time you got your prescription for contraceptives Jim?
Tell me what is wrong it what I wrote. I have been in the medical field for over 30 years. By the way, this information is not hard to find, if you would actually do a simple search. If you took the time to do so, you wouldnít have made a response that just made you look silly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 06:13 PM
 
1,164 posts, read 530,600 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim1921 View Post
if you are referring to contraception, reread what I wrote.
A huge number of Texas counties do not have a county health department or clinic. Residents may have to drive 100 miles to see a doctor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2017, 06:20 PM
 
440 posts, read 201,151 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
A huge number of Texas counties do not have a county health department or clinic. Residents may have to drive 100 miles to see a doctor.
Here, let me help you out:

The Division for Regional and Local Health Services - Texas Local Public Health Organizations
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top