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Old 12-27-2017, 09:22 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,774 posts, read 37,441,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
I also marvel, as to why the US continues to do so well economically, to attract the world's investment, patent-applications, graduate students, screenplay-writers and actors, scientists, entrepreneurs and so forth. .... I just don't understand why the US Dollar is so strong, and US stock markets so buoyant.
From the world's perspective...(as an investor... there are few countries as safe for investment as USA (+/-)

That is changing (in process, but will take decades) UNLESS we (USA) screw up worse than we are at the moment. (highly possible)
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Old 12-28-2017, 03:17 AM
 
5,165 posts, read 2,389,556 times
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Roe v. Wade was still too far off in the future. There was still a very backward mentality.
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Old 12-28-2017, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 600,855 times
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Given the likes of the Birthers, it would seem that we haven't conquered that "backward mentality" thing even today. Indeed, we still have a wealthy cabal that seems dedicated to preserving it. The John Birch Society lives on under dozens of different names. Even with the Soviet bugaboo falling to pieces, the fear-mongers were able to move on to new targets, the next being just as phony and fabricated as the last. How do people buy into such nonsense?
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,652 posts, read 1,885,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Oh, c'mon. You can't paint all us Boomers with the same tar brush anymore than you can the Millennials. Sharing what we had was reinvented with us and the commune concept. We remain huge contributors to the volunteer effort.

I see Millennials liking the concept in abstract but much less hands-on. "I'll donate money but don't expect me to show up and actually talk to people."

And if you are honest First World have-nots have more than any other generation in the world's history. That's why we keep getting more and more of them. Being a have-not in the Western world is a pretty good place to be a have-not.

Truth is, we can't compare, as someone else mentioned. To denigrate the past because it didn't have what we have today is an empty exercise. What we had was new to us and felt like progress at the time.

I do agree with your first paragraph. We are sensing changes in the wind and many are scrambling to get their share before all the prosperity comes crashing down. Too many have bought into the idea of us vs. them instead of cooperation. Decentralilzation and technology have helped bring that about, I think.
Sure I'm saying that all Boomers are the same, but one can always identify trends, and through observation and experience we tend to make generalizations. Again, it's just part of human nature, and perhaps one of our biggest flaws (guilty). But let's think about who holds almost all of the power in this country, and pretty much has since the early 1990s. That's right - it's the Boomers. Here, read this article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...=.7818173b7e9f

Not coincidentally, ever since then we've been led increasingly stray as a nation. Sure, technology and the world environment has played a part in that, but there have been a number of really bad decisions that have "kicked the can down the road" so to speak to become future generations problems. It's going to be up to the Gen X'ers, Millennials, and the post-Millennials to fix those problems, or at least try. But there sure is one heck of a big hole to dig out of now.

I'll agree about the have-nots having it relatively good compared to past history, but in reality, it's all relative to other places in the world at THIS time in history. That's how the vast majority will compare themselves. It's a fact that the middle classes and lower classes of a number of countries in the world have it better than they do here in the good 'ole US of A. That didn't used to be the case until it started changing in the 80's with a myriad of government cuts to safety net programs while other countries invested in programs like government sponsored healthcare, free college, and much more extensive vacation time and maternity/paternity policies. Other countries also made heavy investments in improving infrastructure and public transit while we...didn't (instead we built more roads but let existing ones crumble). Oh yeah, we also slashed funding to institutions for the mentally ill and essentially kicked them onto the streets.

Meanwhile, the grow, grow, grow mentality did allow for some economic boom times, and there was some technological trickle-down that filtered down to the average American, but we are not alone in that. That's happened in almost all industrialized nations. The difference is we sold out a vast majority of our production economy and the better jobs that went with it. A lot of that manufacturing, creative, R&D, and other technical outsourcing was a huge part of what made for our strong middle-class, and it's a huge part of why we are where we are now.
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Old 12-28-2017, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 600,855 times
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The idea that the 80 million US residents who were born between 1946 and 1964 have somehow been conspiring together and acting in concert to undermine the state of the union is about as absurd a notion as can be expected to come along.

For a little background though:

Boomers
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Old 12-28-2017, 10:05 AM
 
1,914 posts, read 1,085,963 times
Reputation: 2042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
My grandparents built their house in 1967. Grandfather is dead, but grandmother is still living there today.

One thing to remember is that a lot of the standards we have today were greatly reduced then. Their house is a 3BR/2BA ~1,400 sq. ft, including the basement garage and den. Tiny little place.

Houses have gotten much bigger over the years, and fundamentally nicer IMO.

That's just one economic data point I can think of where people will say "but it was so much better then," but that's not an apples-to-apples comparison.
Disagree emphatically. Actually the house my grandfather built, a very small and modest home, was affordable back then for the less than the median income. It was affordable for my Dad on a median income. This generation that exact same house requires an income that is at least 3x the median.
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Old 12-28-2017, 10:43 AM
 
3,700 posts, read 3,025,705 times
Reputation: 10007
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShampooBanana View Post
Sure I'm saying that all Boomers are the same, but one can always identify trends, and through observation and experience we tend to make generalizations. Again, it's just part of human nature, and perhaps one of our biggest flaws (guilty). But let's think about who holds almost all of the power in this country, and pretty much has since the early 1990s. That's right - it's the Boomers. Here, read this article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...=.7818173b7e9f

Not coincidentally, ever since then we've been led increasingly stray as a nation. Sure, technology and the world environment has played a part in that, but there have been a number of really bad decisions that have "kicked the can down the road" so to speak to become future generations problems. It's going to be up to the Gen X'ers, Millennials, and the post-Millennials to fix those problems, or at least try. But there sure is one heck of a big hole to dig out of now.

I'll agree about the have-nots having it relatively good compared to past history, but in reality, it's all relative to other places in the world at THIS time in history. That's how the vast majority will compare themselves. It's a fact that the middle classes and lower classes of a number of countries in the world have it better than they do here in the good 'ole US of A. That didn't used to be the case until it started changing in the 80's with a myriad of government cuts to safety net programs while other countries invested in programs like government sponsored healthcare, free college, and much more extensive vacation time and maternity/paternity policies. Other countries also made heavy investments in improving infrastructure and public transit while we...didn't (instead we built more roads but let existing ones crumble). Oh yeah, we also slashed funding to institutions for the mentally ill and essentially kicked them onto the streets.

Meanwhile, the grow, grow, grow mentality did allow for some economic boom times, and there was some technological trickle-down that filtered down to the average American, but we are not alone in that. That's happened in almost all industrialized nations. The difference is we sold out a vast majority of our production economy and the better jobs that went with it. A lot of that manufacturing, creative, R&D, and other technical outsourcing was a huge part of what made for our strong middle-class, and it's a huge part of why we are where we are now.
Well, I've paid my dues this month for the "Boomer masters of society association," and yes we do have a somewhat conspiratorial confab coming up next month on how to "deal" with posters such as yourself who insist on outing us and our leader, a well known Boomer, Dr Evil..On a more serious note, those of us who were protesting things during the formative years of the post war US power cabal, fully realized the growth of a pro corporate/government constituency among our peers.

To act as though there was ever a lockstep generational consensus in America is simply demonstrating an ignorance of your own history. I was in the Army in 67, and getting married. Most of those in my age group (22) at the time were following our parents path to what we imagined was the road to prosperity and raising our children. That Asian war put a real damper on things, many from my high school class were coming home in a box, many others were scrambling to avoid the same end, ending up in bad marriages just to avoid the draft, or going to college without the slightest idea of what to do there besides getting that draft deferment.

To think that amid our working, going to school, going to war, raising families, etc, that we had time to conspire to alter the path of American foreign and domestic policy, to the detriment of future American's yet to be born---Well, it didn't happen.. But someone always grows up to be the next Senator, the next Congressman, banker, CEO, etc, in every generation.

And, those who insist that there was ever a "good time" to be an American must take into account the fact of socio/economic classes, and when that is included in one's view it becomes apparent that the upper reaches of any society have always had it better than those on the lower rungs. There is no "We,"in all of this. Most of the people I've known simply learned their trade or went to college, worked, got married, raised their kids, through the difficult times, and the not so difficult times, but none were among the masters of US destiny...Got to turn up your BS filter, quit reading nonsense and TALK to those evil Boomers..

Last edited by jertheber; 12-28-2017 at 11:01 AM..
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Old 12-28-2017, 12:52 PM
 
3,700 posts, read 3,025,705 times
Reputation: 10007
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
The idea that the 80 million US residents who were born between 1946 and 1964 have somehow been conspiring together and acting in concert to undermine the state of the union is about as absurd a notion as can be expected to come along.

For a little background though:

Boomers
I read the article and agree with the notion that most of those I have known in my age group have contributed much to the 'changed America" outlined in the article. My dad's generation was far from the greatest, I remember when few men would be caught dead shopping for groceries, hugging their children, helping around the house, accepting blacks in their workplace, or women, the list can be quite lengthy when counting the ways most men were just not there for their families beyond bringing home a paycheck. Nostalgia is a byproduct of BS news and the folks who love the myth of the nifty fifty's...
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Old 12-28-2017, 12:52 PM
 
6,815 posts, read 4,408,035 times
Reputation: 11918
Neither generational nor socioeconomic cohorts “conspire together”, but broad trends nevertheless can be sustained by some groups in aggregate, because members of those groups shared similar life-experiences, faced similar hardships and so forth. My generation, for example, remembers Vietnam as little kids gawking at the TV, or perhaps not at all. But I vividly remember the geopolitical tensions of the 1980s, capped by the fall of the Berlin Wall. As a youngster, I watched Wall Street Week with Louis Rukeyser, and grew up believing that whereas the stock market can gyrate intensely, and even occasionally crash, in the long-term it’s going to rise sprightly and surely. With such notions burned into my brain, I largely failed to apprehend the big-picture stock-market trends of the 21st century. But an older investor, who remembers the bear-market of 1973-1974, or a younger one, who never witnessed the 1980s, would likely have beheld quite differently the economic trends that have shaped the recent years.

What we can say about the generation that came of age shortly before my own generation, is that America itself was comparatively young, fresh in its role as the preeminent world power. This brought both prosperity and angst (and the German word “Angst” itself became popularized in English). For my generation, and those who came after, American hegemony in business, culture, military power and world affairs, was the expected and natural course of things.

It is also true, trivially, that the upper classes always have the better of it (well, maybe not in 1790-1794 in France, or 1918 in Russia). So what’s new? The novelty is that never has there been such a separation and dissonance between the pecuniary upper classes, and the cultural/intellectual upper classes. The mainstream might envy the former, but it does not hate them. The same can’t be said regarding the standing of the latter. This tension explains, I think, much of the nostalgic yearning for the mid-20th century.
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Old 12-28-2017, 01:05 PM
 
9,082 posts, read 3,697,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
This tension explains, I think, much of the nostalgic yearning for the mid-20th century.
you mean they want the world to be like it was through 2 world wars? without actually fighting it?
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