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Old 01-11-2018, 11:40 PM
 
2,150 posts, read 1,046,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
That's very true. Students can get unlimited student loans, no questions asked. So the colleges can charge whatever they want in costs and fees. And then squander as much as they want to justify the high cost and bloated budget.

Really? I was told that there is a cap for people who need loans for a bachelor's degree. I know that with grad. loans you get much more money but I know definitely for a bachelor's degree it isn't unlimited as you say.
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Old 01-11-2018, 11:46 PM
 
2,150 posts, read 1,046,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Nope, not really. It's free for those who have been designated to be allowed to be on the college track, which not everyone is. Plus they still have to pay for housing and food.

https://qz.com/812200/is-free-colleg...-free-college/



Why would a college student have a car loan? If they need a car (and if they live on/around campus, they shouldn't), they can drive an old beater like generations of college students before them have.
The generations of college students before them may have gotten a hand-me-down. I didn't come from a family that could buy me an expensive new car (like I saw in high school) or give me a used car. I had to buy a car on my own. Most people I know who got a car out of high school or in high school, got one from parents or grandparents. Not all students have family who can give them used cars. The car I bought isn't expensive. Nevertheless, I still have to pay a car note and auto insurance.

Older generations were able to get jobs with a high school degree and if they worked hard and saved up, could still live the American Dream. I wouldn't compare older generations to my generation.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:48 AM
 
11,376 posts, read 5,874,556 times
Reputation: 21096
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
Really? I was told that there is a cap for people who need loans for a bachelor's degree. I know that with grad. loans you get much more money but I know definitely for a bachelor's degree it isn't unlimited as you say.
Nope. The government program has a cap but you can borrow an enormous pile privately, from the school, and from state programs. The bank doesnít care because the money canít be discharged in a personal bankruptcy. I think Perkins is $5,500 and a Federal direct loan is up to $12,500. The max amount depends on factors like family income and which year of college.
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Old 01-12-2018, 06:44 AM
 
Location: USA
6,171 posts, read 4,962,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAHLUV View Post
I wonder if on-the-job training even exists anymore?? A balance of OJT and the current ways would at least give many more options.
Businesses no longer want to invest in training people, they expect the colleges to pump out "turn key" employees.
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,084 posts, read 1,045,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
How can you even compare the two?
I think you might have misunderstood my post. Your answer seems to go off at a tangent from the comparison I was making.

Quote:
I would dare to say that most students don't select a university based on athletics.
It depends. Choose a school based on a sports program in which they might participate? That's one segment, and I guess there are students who will go somewhere that has a ranked, say, golf team.

But choose a school because it's a perennial winner in a big league? I think you are underestimating the glam and rah-rah factor that a nationally-recognized team (and thus supporting program) brings. I will say it again: a high-profile sports program is most universities' primary marketing tool. It promotes recognition and respect and appeal.

That this R&R&A is for pretty much all the wrong reasons, and supported by rotten, self-serving concepts and financial choices, is the whole point. It's super-high-pressure marketing to justify exorbitant student costs... but effin' Go Team!

Quote:
Should we as a society be encouraging students to choose schools based on sports rather than does this school have my program. Is this program reputable? What quality of education will I be receiving?
Of course not. I again think you might have misread my post(s) a bit.
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,084 posts, read 1,045,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
Businesses no longer want to invest in training people, they expect the colleges to pump out "turn key" employees.
That being the other end of the faulty equation. (And the reliance of US business on public and private schools to do their training for them feeds into the obligations of corporations to the country and society in which they operate - which have been rolled back to the robber-baron days, now.)
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,084 posts, read 1,045,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
TOlder generations were able to get jobs with a high school degree and if they worked hard and saved up, could still live the American Dream.
Define that term? In other than generalities?
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,053 posts, read 10,086,762 times
Reputation: 27892
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
The generations of college students before them may have gotten a hand-me-down. I didn't come from a family that could buy me an expensive new car (like I saw in high school) or give me a used car. I had to buy a car on my own. Most people I know who got a car out of high school or in high school, got one from parents or grandparents. Not all students have family who can give them used cars. The car I bought isn't expensive. Nevertheless, I still have to pay a car note and auto insurance.

Older generations were able to get jobs with a high school degree and if they worked hard and saved up, could still live the American Dream. I wouldn't compare older generations to my generation.
How can you see to drive with that chip on your shoulder? Not all of the older generation got expensive new cars, and most college kids I know these days don't either. They work summers and buy a car that costs $1000 or $2000 max, with maybe some help from parents, sometimes not.
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:17 PM
 
11,437 posts, read 19,463,654 times
Reputation: 18141
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
That's very true. Students can get unlimited student loans, no questions asked. So the colleges can charge whatever they want in costs and fees. And then squander as much as they want to justify the high cost and bloated budget.
Donít forget the massive amounts of money the scammy for profit schools charge. Talked a woman out of going to one that eventually got closed when I told her she could get the same degree at a local community college for 1/3 the price that the scammy place was charging.
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,084 posts, read 1,045,425 times
Reputation: 3942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
Donít forget the massive amounts of money the scammy for profit schools charge. Talked a woman out of going to one that eventually got closed when I told her she could get the same degree at a local community college for 1/3 the price that the scammy place was charging.
It can be hard to see where the scammy line is, these days.

Is a big-name Midwestern U that aggressively pursues students to come spend $150k to get an indifferent, cookie-cutter CS degree really any better than a private regional diploma mill with a very well staffed financial aid office? (Of course, they do a have Big Pac 10 12 team!)

What about the utterly cynical franchised diploma mills like University of Arizona and National University that boast about how few "irrelevant" classes their night-school crowd has to take?
("'Whom are you?' he asked politely, for he had been to night school." - someone like Thornton Wilder.)
Where does the scam line lie between, say, Harvard/Yale/Princeton/Stanford and Western School of Truck Driving and Computer Repair?
(That last is the creation of a beloved late friend, who could spiel out ads for them for hours. According to him, their mottoes were "Yesterday I could not spell TECHNICIAN; today I are one!" and "Our degrees come on real paper!")
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