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Old 01-17-2018, 11:39 PM
 
3,633 posts, read 2,047,521 times
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Why does every single food commercial look disgusting?
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Old 01-18-2018, 01:12 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,142 posts, read 1,069,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Why does every single food commercial look disgusting?
They're trying to burn out your TV with oversaturated colors. I've seen radioactive waste that's not as bright green as the lettuce in a BK commercial.
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Old 01-18-2018, 08:22 AM
 
Location: In the outlet by the lightswitch
1,529 posts, read 906,554 times
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I would say advertising has a limited effect on me, but it does have an effect (sometimes in the advertisers favor and other times not). I don't go out an buy every product I see, but sometimes something catches my eye and I give it a shot. But at the same time, I don't buy name brands when there is a generic available and too much advertising can turn me off to a product or service.

I have a gutter cleaning company in mind for that result of too much advertising. They were recommended to me by a neighbor and they came and cleaned my gutters. After cleaning, they then tried to upsell me on BS I don't need. Then they started emailing me "specials" and even calling my cell phone once a week (I had given them my number for the day of the job so they could call me with any issues). The result, they are on my email spam list and I blocked them from my phone. While they cleaned the gutters, I will never hire them again because it's not like they did anything special that Joe the handyman couldn't do and unlike him, they annoy the crap out of me with their constant advertising.

I too don't answer my phone anymore if I don't know who it is. I record any TV shows and fast forward commercials, etc. So there is a negative effect of too much advertising too.
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Old 01-18-2018, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,142 posts, read 1,069,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMBGBlueCanary View Post
I would say advertising has a limited effect on me, but it does have an effect (sometimes in the advertisers favor and other times not). I don't go out an buy every product I see, but sometimes something catches my eye and I give it a shot. But at the same time, I don't buy name brands when there is a generic available and too much advertising can turn me off to a product or service.
Well said, but little of that applies to advertising as it's used by the majors. I used to get - but haven't in more recent years - the argument, "I just saw an ad for Budweiser and it didn't make me run out and buy a six-pack!" Which is fine, because that's not the purpose of AB's ad.

Modern marketing is a powerful socioeconomic shaping force, and its goals are multiple and mostly subtle. Only a limited range of advertising (by the majors, not obnoxious local companies) is meant to make you jump out of your chair and buy the product.

Quote:
I have a gutter cleaning company in mind for that result of too much advertising. They were recommended to me by a neighbor and they came and cleaned my gutters. After cleaning, they then tried to upsell me on BS I don't need.
I sometimes wonder which is worse: the megacorps molding us into consumer-droids, or smaller companies that adopt their invasive, high-pressure techniques to sell toothbrushes or car washes - an absolutely classic case of Alan Watts' definition of a disciple: Someone who got an A in the course, but missed the whole point. Way, way too many small-scale marketing people have sat through way too many webinars and read too many airplane books. Just sayin'.

But yeah, upsell drives me nuts. Especially when it's a nominally professional personal provider like a dentist, but it's no less annoying when it's just a yard guy. I have a possible solution for the problem, but it's downstream a little and not fully developed.
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,142 posts, read 1,069,705 times
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And a revealing article in today's NYT. It may be behind a paywall for you (they allow ten articles a month for nonsubscribers), but here's the links.
Apropos of this discussion, there are a couple of interesting paragraphs in the latter story. Emphasis and omissions mine:
We’re simple animals, excited by bright colors, it turns out.
Silicon Valley companies like Facebook and Google know this, and they have increasingly been turning to the field of applied neuroscience to see how exactly brains respond to color in the apps, what brings pleasure and what keeps the eye.
[...]
This week, two major investors asked Apple to figure out how to help parents limit their children’s use of iPhones and iPads [...] There’s also a growing movement among some early tech employees warning against the products they’ve built. And many consumers are starting to wonder what this is all doing to our minds.
That's the level that modern marketing works at - not brainstorming for a new catch phrase over whiskeys all around, but by using some of the most sophisticated physiological/psychological knowledge on the planet.

Some are going to scoff, "Oh, that's just tech research, not marketing" - which indicates that they have no idea what the role and praxis of marketing in product development is. Marketing does not just sell whatever Engineering hands over to them. Hasn't been that way for decades.

And yes, this is another "googly eyes on cereal" revelation... it's right there in front of us and on every phone around the world, so what's the big deal? Twofold: that it's not accidental or just due to some designer's whim, but a carefully-studied, scientifically-grounded, research-based effort to bond us to the product... and not for our benefit.

It's also as much the tip of an iceberg as the googly eyes. We will not know the truth about the depths of psychological manipulation to addict us to smartphones and apps for at least a decade, when researchers who don't work in the industry finally parse out the details and publish them in some obscure journal. By which time they will all be old hat, everybody-knows, and replaced by yet more sophisticated techniques that have even less visibility and greater ability to penetrate consumer defenses.

Bet there'll be an app for it...
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
5,170 posts, read 4,750,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I sometimes wonder which is worse: the megacorps molding us into consumer-droids...
Preying on our tendency to become addicted...

If it was only about selling products I wouldn't worry too much. But it's also shaping and manipulating our entire worldview. And learning and knowing how to best steer the herd in whatever direction they wish.
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,142 posts, read 1,069,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rruff View Post
If it was only about selling products I wouldn't worry too much. But it's also shaping and manipulating our entire worldview. And learning and knowing how to best steer the herd in whatever direction they wish.
My message in almost bumper-sticker length. Applause.

By the way, I find it hilarious that "going gray" on your smartphone does not involve complicated apps, mods, rooting or the application of paint to your screen. For Android at least, it's the complicated technical process of turning on "Grayscale" in the Accessibility/Vision menu.

I like the look, completely irrespective of any psychotechnical issues.
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Old 01-27-2018, 04:15 AM
 
69 posts, read 168,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rruff View Post
The more important factor is that we are being spied on. You were searching on the internet, so that isn't a big deal IMO, but I've heard many anecdotal claims that simply mentioning something when there is a phone in the room (but not being used) will get picked up as well.

I got the ad blocker on the internet and I don't get many ads. I ditched the TV 30 years ago.
This happened to me this week!
I mentioned, we didn't have a kitchen tool in the house to squeeze a lemon!
2 days later, Amazon suggested me this:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010TFF6AE/

And I haven't searched for it online at all!

Can you imagine?

Now, I did end up buying it. but you're right. They're listening to us, via our phones.
This may be the reason we need more RAM and ROM on our phones, and our 10x larger battery size, that actually lasts us 10x less!

Last edited by Prodigit; 01-27-2018 at 05:26 AM..
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Old 01-27-2018, 04:22 AM
 
69 posts, read 168,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
There are only two kinds of people in the world: 1) Those who are influenced by advertising and 2) Those who lie and claim they are not influenced by advertising. Unless you're living in a cabin in Idaho and haven't bought anything in decades, living off whatever you've trapped and wearing the resulting pelts on your back, you've made choices based on what you've read, seen or heard.

I mean, didn't you just post something asking about Carvana? So I guess you were influenced by advertising after all.

Yeah, I get it. There's a lot of obnoxious ads out there. But there's a lot of smart work out there, too. The rest of your treatise is kind of absurd. If anything, ads are becoming more targeted with far better tracking of results. And if advertising didn't work, do you really think businesses would spend money on it?
I became aware of Carvana through facebook. However, I've never purchased from them.
I've looked at their deals, and they end up being just a tad better than Carmax; but a lot worse than our local Offlease store.
But what I really like, is Craigslist.
I found no ads for craigslist, and you can find reasonably good cars, in a driving condition, for between $1k-$5k; quite often the same cars are sold in Carmax for $10k with 'store warranty' of a few weeks.

Most of the products I buy, I have found by searching for them. Google, Amazon, Newegg, Ebay,...
Or websites or forums dedicated to product reviews or descriptions (like Cnet, CES, or product forums, or others...); all sites which I've found via Google, or word of mouth.

Last edited by Prodigit; 01-27-2018 at 05:26 AM..
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Old 01-27-2018, 04:27 AM
 
69 posts, read 168,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
America just has a culture of advertising. We expect it. Advertising has risen in some cases to high-art. It draws some of the best talent, and indeed, modern culture itself is deeply rooted in the ethos and idiom of advertising.

But what increasingly annoys me, is the targeted online ads that intrude on the browsing/viewing experience. Even if in principle I might be interested in the product being pitched, the fact that the pitch is foisted upon me, precisely when I wish to watch some other video, or read some other essay, is intensely irritating. I may have had an inclination to buy the product being advertised, but then the ad's presence is so insulting, that I'd feel manipulated, if I were to go ahead with my purchase.

An example would be car-parts. I'd be searching online for the requisite parts, say a throttle-cable or a sensor for the fuel-metering system, eventually converging (or nearly so) to a decision to buy. Then I'd be watching a you-tube video, and instead of the video, I get bombarded by ads for car parts. Now suddenly I'm irritated, and suspend my decision to buy. The ad has turned a would-be consumer into a peeved protester.
And it doesn't stop there!
You might end up buying the car part, but still be bombarded for weeks with ads about it.
Like, just spent $2k on a new and beautiful 4k TV, but for the next 2 weeks, internet finds it necessary to let you know there are nice $6k and $8k 4k tv's in your neighborhood "on sale"!
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