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Old 02-19-2018, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
12,685 posts, read 9,451,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stonepa View Post
Here are the types of architects we hire. Didn't realize it was so hard for some people to Google things:

Technical Architect in tech industry - https://www.cwjobs.co.uk/careers-adv...ical-architect

Data Architect - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_architect

Business Warehouse Architect - https://www.techopedia.com/definitio...t-bi-architect

User Experience Architect - https://artisantalent.com/job-descri...b-description/

Machine Learning Architect - https://xilinx.referrals.selectminds...ect-ml-ai-4371

And programmers today are really builders - they build services and products for customers versus writing reports like they did in the past.

https://www.webpagefx.com/blog/inter...-in-the-world/

I'll stay in my bubble.
I always think of architects being CPU Architects -- you know, like the architect of the Intel® Xeon® Processor E7-4850 v4 for example.
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Old 02-20-2018, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
6,695 posts, read 7,362,008 times
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Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Vatican City?
Well played.
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,036 posts, read 5,210,035 times
Reputation: 9498
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndindy View Post
Not always, but in general, the highest paying positions are going to be concentrated in higher COLs. It's the way the market works, and we have seen a shift to that model in the last several years.
I don't disagree. And unless your a physician or own a large tractor dealership, you will never have the same opportunities in Wichita as you do elsewhere.

But, its one thing to compare Boston, San Fran, Seattle, NYC to Paducah or Roanoke, and quite another to compare it to Houston, Minneapolis, Charlotte, even Philadelphia or Chicago.


Anyhow, the horse is now a well flailed corpse, but I think the calculation changes even among highly skilled professionals as you change industries. What might be worth it for someone working at the zenith of their industry at Google will change for a CPA or engineer...
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Old 02-20-2018, 04:46 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,688 posts, read 8,775,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndindy View Post
Not always, but in general, the highest paying positions are going to be concentrated in higher COLs. It's the way the market works, and we have seen a shift to that model in the last several years.

Why is it cheap to live in Nebraska, Kentucky, North Carolina, ect? Because not a lot of people want to live there, and you don't have a lot of higher wage opportunities in those states. Yes, housing is cheaper in smaller markets. Yes, it's less expensive to eat out in Ohio than NYC. Overall, when companies are trying to attract talent to work for them, people want amenities of cities, and not farmland and defunct towns. So you end up with more people moving to larger markets, while the majority of the smaller markets are left to decline. Yes, there are some fine smaller cities that people will say have vibrant economies. Overall, this is in bigger cities, especially when you consider Science/Math/Engineering/Software/Medicine areas.....
My point is that in certain industries, your employer doesn't care where you live. You just have to have the qualifications and availability to do the job, and that doesn't necessarily mean you have to live in the same town as your clients. You can live in Wyoming, be employed by a company in Seattle, and have a client in Boston, and commute in twenty seconds to a home office. This is basically my family's life.
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Old 02-20-2018, 06:24 PM
 
2,360 posts, read 1,031,855 times
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Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
My point is that in certain industries, your employer doesn't care where you live. You just have to have the qualifications and availability to do the job, and that doesn't necessarily mean you have to live in the same town as your clients. You can live in Wyoming, be employed by a company in Seattle, and have a client in Boston, and commute in twenty seconds to a home office. This is basically my family's life.
I can do my job remotely, but the corp office only allows us to do this when where sick, weather related events or unrelated emergencies that shuts down the building. It is about control in our work place. They assume that we will be goofing off at home or forget things.
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