U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:16 PM
 
11,315 posts, read 5,839,816 times
Reputation: 20979

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
A few others to add to the list:

Patent prosecution -- patent attorneys can be just about anywhere
Tax law -- can be just about anywhere
Tax accounting -- can be just about anywhere
Radiology -- radiologists reading X-Rays, MRIs & CTs are usually remote
I’ve been telecommuting since 2009. Unfortunately, you sometimes end up with periods where you absolutely need to be there. I’m in one now. Weekly travel including a 4 1/2 hour flight since early November. I had a sustained 8 month period once though the flight was much shorter.

The other problem is that most jobs want you sitting in their office chair every day even though it’s totally unnecessary. If you telecommute from somewhere fairly far from one of your natural job markets, you can have an awful lot of down time between jobs. It’s happened to me twice and there’s a lot of anxiety wondering if you’ll ever work again. I can afford the lengthy down time but it’s no fun staring at the ceiling at night anytime something looks bad at work contemplating looking for that next job.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:21 PM
 
11,315 posts, read 5,839,816 times
Reputation: 20979
I’d comment that high quality public transportation would solve the high COL thing since it’s mostly housing. If you have 120 mph rail, you can live 60 miles out and be in the city center in 30 minutes. Today, housing is expensive because it needs to be close to work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
10,638 posts, read 3,314,105 times
Reputation: 12748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
HR? Really? For the fairly routine info processing and reporting tasks? I can't see how remote would work well for anything involving employee interaction. I mean, maybe, in a company with a good conferencing system.

"Consulting" is pretty vague, and is almost inherently client/job/project/freelance/gig based. Unless you mean from the other end, where a consulting company with salaried employees remotes them.
A lot of HR positions are remote. I will also add accounting, insurance agents and underwriters and some teachers. There are quite a few professions that are now remote.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:34 PM
 
2,360 posts, read 1,027,668 times
Reputation: 2071
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I’d comment that high quality public transportation would solve the high COL thing since it’s mostly housing. If you have 120 mph rail, you can live 60 miles out and be in the city center in 30 minutes. Today, housing is expensive because it needs to be close to work.
That i can agree with. But you get those not in my back yard kiddies and other politic BS that prevents this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:39 PM
 
5,605 posts, read 4,159,335 times
Reputation: 12338
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitpausebutton2 View Post
Sorry, they jack rent up after EVERY lease that renews. When i first got here 2 years ago, my 2 bed room apt was running 900 a month. 6 month renew went to 1050, the following 6 month went to 1275. This force me to move out to were i am now. I drive by that place and its semi-full but now they are running sale price for 900 again to get the next sucker. So if they can advertise for 900 for new clients, then why jack up the rates for existing ones?
First of all short term leases, typically those less than a year, are always more expensive than year long leases. Not sure why you’d sign up for that.

Second, sure they offer “incentives” for new residents. Moving costs money and giving prospective residents a reduced rate for part or all of their initial lease term as an enticement makes sense. Many people don’t like to move so they’ll stay despite rent increases. Clearly they’re not losing enough residents due to rent hikes to impact their bottom line. Especially if the rent they charge is in line with other options in the area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:46 PM
 
2,768 posts, read 1,496,259 times
Reputation: 2172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I am good with the list, but so far it's just professions that theoretically can be remote and for which there are examples. And things like radiology, while done remotely from the patient/care site, are often done in an office - so it's a centralized office, but I wouldn't call it working remotely. Every instance of a non-local worker is not necessarily "working remotely."

Numbers, anyone? A simple article on how many remote workers (as in, permanently employed with one company and working from home or something a lot like it) might be around and in what fields?

I mean, a lot of psychics and sex workers work remotely, too. I can give you phone numbers.
Go dig up your own stats, amigo. Not necessary.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
2,988 posts, read 1,017,500 times
Reputation: 3808
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I’d comment that high quality public transportation would solve the high COL thing since it’s mostly housing. If you have 120 mph rail, you can live 60 miles out and be in the city center in 30 minutes. Today, housing is expensive because it needs to be close to work.
I am bemused that this is considered a solution. For one thing, it is absolutely unlikely to exist without significant government subsidy - the costs are stratospheric and the ROI at any reasonable passenger rate probably stretches to a half-century. I'd say there are better ways to spend collective money than to enrich a construction company or two and a handful of rail executives.

And all it would do is assure that Smallville, 60 miles out, becomes a more expensive place to live. Net gain: zero to something negative, long commutes for a lot of people included.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
2,988 posts, read 1,017,500 times
Reputation: 3808
Quote:
Originally Posted by damba View Post
Go dig up your own stats, amigo. Not necessary.
Okay, the vast remote worker population remains anecdotal cuz everyone here knows one. Got it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 05:50 PM
 
2,768 posts, read 1,496,259 times
Reputation: 2172
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
I'm having a tough time with that statement.

Why would anyone voluntarily eat dinner at Red Lobster?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2018, 06:10 PM
 
2,360 posts, read 1,027,668 times
Reputation: 2071
Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
First of all short term leases, typically those less than a year, are always more expensive than year long leases. Not sure why you’d sign up for that.

Second, sure they offer “incentives” for new residents. Moving costs money and giving prospective residents a reduced rate for part or all of their initial lease term as an enticement makes sense. Many people don’t like to move so they’ll stay despite rent increases. Clearly they’re not losing enough residents due to rent hikes to impact their bottom line. Especially if the rent they charge is in line with other options in the area.
Its all they offer here. 6 months on majority and 1 year on a few upper class apts. If they can offer "incentives" all the time, then they can stop increasing the rent all the time. The average renter in that apt is about a year. I didnt meet anybody that was their longer. So they do see the increase and move out when it nearly doubles. Bait and switch is the theme.. They are in line because majority of the apt management is run by a "**government" that gets together and comes up with pricing. If they didnt, then the apt down the street would still be cheaper, but since they got a letter from that "government" to raise their prices to be in-line with others or face fines. They were always full and decent place, and now its nearly empty like the rest and starting to look like a dump. All it takes is one apt management to raise prices because they want more cash and rest will follow.

* they all use the exact same application process/fees. TAA is the group self government.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top