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Old 01-28-2018, 04:59 AM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,373,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Nah, you're making a lot of stupid assumptions about our resources and whether we should have bought the house. Fix-up costs being higher than anticipated doesn't automatically make something a money pit or indicate it shouldn't have been bought.

What we learned is that we sucked at estimating first year fix-up costs.
Funny you're calling ME stupid, since I didn't call YOU stupid.

A proper inspection and not ballparking those big ticket items would have easily told you the defects and associated costs.
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:16 AM
 
4,713 posts, read 2,251,841 times
Reputation: 8699
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
Funny you're calling ME stupid, since I didn't call YOU stupid.
I said you were making stupid assumptions, which is true.

When you see someone saying their first year fix up costs for a new home were more than they thought and immediately start wagging your finger about how they learned a lesson about buying a home within their resources and shouldn't have bought that home etc. you're making pretty stupid assumptions. It's quite common for first year costs to be higher than anticipated (possibly the norm?), everyone who buys a home isn't stretching their resources to do, and unanticipated first year expenses don't make a house a money pit or an unwise purchase.

Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
A proper inspection and not ballparking those big ticket items would have easily told you the defects and associated costs.
Really? I guess it's possible but I've never had a home inspector dig up sprinkler lines or trench foundations to see if tree roots are an issue.
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Old 01-28-2018, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Proxima Centauri
3,754 posts, read 1,591,896 times
Reputation: 4147
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
I am astonished to learn that (2012 data) Canadian renters have nearly 20 times the net worth of US renters - about $120K (~$95K USD) vs ~5K. FWIW, Canadian homeowners are about 4 times as wealthy as US homeowners.

How did Canadian renters get so wealthy relative to US renters?

https://thetyee.ca/News/2017/02/22/The-Big-Give/
Medical care provided by the state.
Pharmaceuticals paid for under that medical system.
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Old 01-29-2018, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
9,594 posts, read 9,423,079 times
Reputation: 9198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonyafd View Post
Medical care provided by the state.
Pharmaceuticals paid for under that medical system.
Medical care is provided to Canadians by the Canadian people not the "State". The State is the people. U.S. medical care is also provided by the American people. The difference is that Canadian healthcare uses mass taxation to provide the revenue and the providers are paid out of that treasury. The U.S. has thousands of far smaller treasuries competing for revenue stream, which is provided via voluntary contributions. It is grossly inefficient, and rife with localized fraud and inconsistent pricing and outcomes. Deductibles, co-pays, out of pocket expenses, exceptions... all are features of a system where the treasurer tries to maximize their profit by limiting what percent of your premiums will actually go to paying your medical expenses. If they could (and they might all yet) insurers would insist that you pay all of your own medical expenses after paying your premiums for their health insurance. That's exactly the kind of health plan my neighbors have. They pay $800/mo to an insurer and they hope to God that they will NEVER ever need to file a claim, because they each have $15K of deductible to cover first, and you know, if you are clearing that.... buddy, its over. For actual health care... you know, the stuff (tests, office visits, supplements, etc.) that actually keeps you healthy and out of the urgent care... or worse. Yah... totally up to them to find the money for. Do you think they do? Would you?
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Old 01-30-2018, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
6,964 posts, read 5,183,151 times
Reputation: 9390
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
And that makes Canadian renters wealthier than American renters how?

I don't think it has to do as much with renting as it does with a lack of subsidization of home ownership.

In the US, in a very broad sense, most renters only rent because they can't buy. Other countries don't have the same incentives for home ownership. Also, some countries have different LL/Tenant laws that may or may not make renting more attractive long term. I'm not sure what Canada does.
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