U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-10-2018, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
2,961 posts, read 1,007,246 times
Reputation: 3776

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by james777 View Post
You should ask that question to the globalist politicians who keep sending our jobs overseas.
Except that our jobs aren't really going overseas. We've exported all our manufacturing because our consumer goods are a lot cheaper that way; we've outsourced a vast number of service jobs that can be remoted. But mostly, we've just lost the job slots to technological advance, and it's on the cusp of getting a lot worse.

The solutions are obvious once you climb out of the deep rut that blocks your view of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-08-2018, 06:49 PM
 
11,888 posts, read 14,355,740 times
Reputation: 7526
Those who say things are getting worse are focusing on the USA. Poverty is on the decline worldwide.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2018, 07:15 PM
 
8,021 posts, read 6,220,904 times
Reputation: 12004
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Those who say things are getting worse are focusing on the USA. Poverty is on the decline worldwide.
They aren't even getting worse in the U.S. We are in a much better place then we were during the recession.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2018, 07:17 PM
 
8,021 posts, read 6,220,904 times
Reputation: 12004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Except that our jobs aren't really going overseas. We've exported all our manufacturing because our consumer goods are a lot cheaper that way; we've outsourced a vast number of service jobs that can be remoted. But mostly, we've just lost the job slots to technological advance, and it's on the cusp of getting a lot worse.

The solutions are obvious once you climb out of the deep rut that blocks your view of them.
Joseph Goebbels once said that if you repeat a lie enough people will believe it to be true. That is what we are seeing right now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2018, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,154 posts, read 792,913 times
Reputation: 4322
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Because the US is a global empire, and as a global empire, is had both the privilege and the responsibility of global stewardship. This was well-understood in the aftermath of WW2. Why in recent years is it getting forgotten?
This is a broad general thread about the global economy. It was started six weeks ago, and has generated 14 responses, only two of which exceed three lines in length.

And now you know what is wrong with America's place as your self-proclaimed "global empire".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2018, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,275 posts, read 15,279,446 times
Reputation: 7019
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickL28 View Post
So what, the usa is well ahead of where we were pre recession. Why are we responsible for the well being of other countries?? -
American brands are still seen as being very high quality in many parts of the world, and if disposable income rises in other parts of the world, we can sell more farm machinery/movie tickets/software/Coca Cola distribution licenses/canned tomato sauce there.

So a rising tide is good for us too- a lot of American businesses make good profits on those exports to emerging markets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2018, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,154 posts, read 792,913 times
Reputation: 4322
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
American brands are still seen as being very high quality in many parts of the world, and if disposable income rises in other parts of the world, we can sell more farm machinery/movie tickets/software/Coca Cola distribution licenses/canned tomato sauce there.

So a rising tide is good for us too- a lot of American businesses make good profits on those exports to emerging markets.
Less true than you may think. Here in the Philippines, nearly everything in the supermarket is Philippinw-branded, and usually produced in the Philippines. If you see an American brand name, all the Americans are getting is the franchise fee licensing the brand, although a tiny few things have American bar codes, like Smuckers and Folgers. Things that must be imported are rarely of American origin.

Milk, for example, is reconstituted in Germany and marketed under the brand of a subsidiary of San Miguel brewery. From McDonalds, the only cash flow back to the US is the right to use the arches, and they are a very distant second after the ubiquitous Jollibee. I can't find anything at Ace Hardware that's made in USA, fro Scotch tape to Black and Decker.

As you say, distribution licenses are a good source of exchange, but as local companies marketing their store brands become more credible, American brand names are disappearing, and that share will only get smaller in the future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2018, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Ohio
17,986 posts, read 13,233,625 times
Reputation: 13765
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
This is a broad general thread about the global economy. It was started six weeks ago, and has generated 14 responses, only two of which exceed three lines in length.

And now you know what is wrong with America's place as your self-proclaimed "global empire".
Rising prosperity means increased consumption of commodities, which puts Inflation pressure on commodities and drives up prices. So long as wages in the US match Demand-pull Inflation, it's not a problem for Americans.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2018, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,275 posts, read 15,279,446 times
Reputation: 7019
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Less true than you may think. Here in the Philippines, nearly everything in the supermarket is Philippinw-branded, and usually produced in the Philippines. If you see an American brand name, all the Americans are getting is the franchise fee licensing the brand, although a tiny few things have American bar codes, like Smuckers and Folgers. Things that must be imported are rarely of American origin.
Just because you don't see it directly in a supermarket doesn't mean it's not there:

https://ustr.gov/countries-regions/s...ic/philippines

Quote:
U.S. goods exports to Philippines in 2016 were $8.2 billion, up 3.8% ($298 million) from 2015 and up 7.7% from 2006.

The top export categories (2-digit HS) in 2016 were: electrical machinery ($2.5 billion), machinery ($777 million), cereals (wheat) ($611 million), aircraft ($523 million), and miscellaneous grain, seeds, fruit (flour) ($483 million).

U.S. total exports of agricultural products to Philippines totaled $2.6 billion in 2016, our 11th largest agricultural export market. Leading domestic export categories include: soybean meal ($730 million), wheat ($592 million), dairy products ($227 million), soybeans ($104 million), and prepared food ($89 million).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2018, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,154 posts, read 792,913 times
Reputation: 4322
That's ^^ about $80 per person, probably lower than most countries. And 7.7% over ten years isn noit awesome. And three of the four largest categories (machinery, aircraft) don't directly impact the lives of many people, and maybe no poor people at all. The're bought by huge corporations, who use them to increase their own lion's share of the rising wealth.

It wasn't that many years ago that nearly everything eaten by third world workers was either raised locally (rice anb chicken and coconuts) or imported in the original American package. Local processing of foods has had a huge effect on the cost of feeding the population, and significantly cut into the power of superpowers to control global economies. Which is why the supermarket shelves are a better indicator than you admit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top