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Old 02-07-2018, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
2,961 posts, read 1,012,279 times
Reputation: 3776

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
So you're going to violate the laws of physics and jump on the "truly high-speed, high bandwidth wireless service" fiction?
No. I'm not advocating anything here, just explaining to the wailing free-market crowd that things are where they are for a long series of good reasons that are approaching obsolescence, but are not some "non compete" conspiracy to screw townies.

I am thoroughly familiar with all the technologies involved. But tech alone is not going to solve the problems of about 90% of the towns with one cable provider.

Quote:
Speaking of Connecticut, my girlfriend lives in a less small town in Connecticut and has service from Frontier, the local monopoly telco that bought the hairball AT&T hacked up when they dumped their wireline business. It's ATM over fiber to a DSLAM in a concrete bunker 500 meters away.
Yep, a few towns have that degree of modernity. I'd guess... she lives within 30 miles of NYC or somewhere around New Haven?

The rest of CT has DSL, too. And I mean DSL - 6mbps on a good day if you're near a DSLAM. 3mbps of you're lucky. 90% uptime in a good month. With the town-by-town model, it's completely hit or miss. Some managed competing cable companies and full high-speed ADSL. Others have Charter's rejected gear from 1992 and no options.

My small but relatively wealthy town had Comcast, and Frontier A/DSL that ranged from about 20mbps to 3 in most areas. The town infrastructure was a Comcast drop to every town facility, at $150 a pop and with zero reliability in storm conditions. That's a little sad, but representative of most smaller towns there. We were lucky to have the right combination of people and resources to install 25 miles of fiber with high redundancy, meaning even the minor town installations (like secondary fire stations) have gigabit speeds, and with a switch to modern servers and VOIP, town hall can move to the emergency center at the high school in five minutes. Literally 1982 to 2020 in one three-month leap.

But all the arm- and fiber- and tech-waving won't fix the one-crummy-cable-provider for some very large number of smaller communities across the US. It's going to be a case of revolution, not evolution.

By the way, I was a tech journalist when AT&T unveiled their plans for "three-gee" wireless, and sounded like they had drunk the Buck Rogers Kool-Aid. Remember 3G?
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Old 02-07-2018, 05:16 PM
 
11,299 posts, read 5,834,479 times
Reputation: 20925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I am thoroughly familiar with all the technologies involved. But tech alone is not going to solve the problems of about 90% of the towns with one cable provider.
The problem isn't the cable provider. It's that the phone company that is supposed to compete with it is not up to the challenge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Yep, a few towns have that degree of modernity. I'd guess... she lives within 30 miles of NYC or somewhere around New Haven?
Nope. West Hartford. The other haven of luxury SUVs and luxury sedans driven by people who somehow drive worse than Bostonians. I didn't think it was possible.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
The rest of CT has DSL, too. And I mean DSL - 6mbps on a good day if you're near a DSLAM. 3mbps of you're lucky. 90% uptime in a good month. With the town-by-town model, it's completely hit or miss. Some managed competing cable companies and full high-speed ADSL. Others have Charter's rejected gear from 1992 and no options.
I need to run a speedtest on my girlfriend's bonded DSL. It's really slow compared to the 420 megabit/sec down at my house but it's not awful.

Charter went bankrupt 9 years ago and had all kinds of problems. They recently acquired Time-Warner Cable and Bright House so they're just as big as Comcast. That's created a totally different set of problems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
My small but relatively wealthy town had Comcast, and Frontier A/DSL that ranged from about 20mbps to 3 in most areas. The town infrastructure was a Comcast drop to every town facility, at $150 a pop and with zero reliability in storm conditions. That's a little sad, but representative of most smaller towns there. We were lucky to have the right combination of people and resources to install 25 miles of fiber with high redundancy, meaning even the minor town installations (like secondary fire stations) have gigabit speeds, and with a switch to modern servers and VOIP, town hall can move to the emergency center at the high school in five minutes. Literally 1982 to 2020 in one three-month leap.

But all the arm- and fiber- and tech-waving won't fix the one-crummy-cable-provider for some very large number of smaller communities across the US. It's going to be a case of revolution, not evolution.

By the way, I was a tech journalist when AT&T unveiled their plans for "three-gee" wireless, and sounded like they had drunk the Buck Rogers Kool-Aid. Remember 3G?
I suspect your Comcast leap was more likely from 2008 to 2018. Most towns were on DOCSIS 2.0 modems that made all the buildings in the town look like they were on one LAN using tunneling technology. I used to work for that cable modem company though not on those products. Comcast has removed almost all of their DOCSIS 2.0 stuff from their plant. They needed to reclaim the IPv4 address space and DOCSIS 2.0 didn't support IPv6.

I was doing cable industry telephone infrastructure when 3G rolled out. It was pretty limited and very expensive. A Blackberry with all kinds of data compression for text emails worked OK. Kind-a different from the user experience on my iPhone X, LTE, and unlimited data.
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Old 02-08-2018, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
2,961 posts, read 1,012,279 times
Reputation: 3776
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
The problem isn't the cable provider. It's that the phone company that is supposed to compete with it is not up to the challenge.
Because the cable company is using amplified coax that, with technical upgrades here and there, can run gigabit speeds.

The not-a-telco-no'mo is using 50-60-80 year old copper pairs laid for 3kHz voice service.

Quote:
Nope. West Hartford. The other haven of luxury SUVs and luxury sedans driven by people who somehow drive worse than Bostonians. I didn't think it was possible.
Heh. We could kick this around for hours. Lived east of Hartford, didn't include it in my guess because only a few of those westie pockets around the Governor's mansion have truly reliable high-speed internet options. But even after six years of CT drivers, I will take them back after six months with Denver drivers...

Quote:
I was doing cable industry telephone infrastructure when 3G rolled out. It was pretty limited and very expensive. A Blackberry with all kinds of data compression for text emails worked OK. Kind-a different from the user experience on my iPhone X, LTE, and unlimited data.
Right, but when wireless data was on "2G" it looked miraculous/impossible. Just as truly high-speed wireless looks blue-sky and buck-rogers today. It won't happen tomorrow, or next year... but I would take the long bet that gigabit wireless becomes the long-term replacement for wired service, at least in most residential areas.

(I have some great stories from that 3g press conference. I managed to make senior AT&T suits squawk and run in circles. I was mean.)

And no, nothing beats wires. I speak on conversion to streaming from time to time, and the crowd that's never used anything but WiFi gets all upset when I say you really, really do want to wire in your Roku.
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Old 02-23-2018, 12:08 PM
 
8,374 posts, read 7,362,552 times
Reputation: 18229
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitpausebutton2 View Post
Im just a worker.. lol. Not sure what happen but why tell a company no matter who it is, were they cant advertise? I remember when i worked at a TV station, we was told to play a PSA over remax ads due to a territory disagreement. But still? Some want it and most don't, so why even have it? Brings back the beer wars aka Smokey and the bandit.
That is common in business, where a company has the exclusive right to sell the product in certain areas such as a city, county, or region.
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Old 02-26-2018, 03:47 PM
 
2,360 posts, read 1,026,502 times
Reputation: 2071
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
That is common in business, where a company has the exclusive right to sell the product in certain areas such as a city, county, or region.
sure hope they are paying their competition for having such exclusive rights. Didnt know states was a "property" for advertising.
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Old 02-26-2018, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Ohio
17,986 posts, read 13,233,625 times
Reputation: 13765
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Sorry it impinges on your notion of utterly free markets, or whatever. I don't think anyone can make the issue any simpler.
The employee can always pay the company the value of the intellectual property and assets they are taking with them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyewackette View Post
Rank and file should never have to sign such a thing and a company that attempts it is clearly planning on screwing their rank and file over by locking you in to the job so you have no leverage (can't just go get another job). ESPECIALLY when they spring it on you while you're filling out your tax paperwork, LOL!
Or maybe the company is protecting is intellectual property and assets.
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Old 02-26-2018, 07:06 PM
 
2,767 posts, read 1,494,078 times
Reputation: 2172
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitpausebutton2 View Post
sure hope they are paying their competition for having such exclusive rights. Didnt know states was a "property" for advertising.
You must live in a bubble.
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Old 02-28-2018, 05:31 AM
 
251 posts, read 87,791 times
Reputation: 393
Put it this way, if a non-compete potentially interferes with your job security/income ability then don't sign it. You may be out of work today but at least you won't be restricted to seeking employment with their direct competitor. Unless they are PAYING you for the time period you'd be ineligible to work for the competition I don't see the value of why any worker would agree to signing a non-compete. And an introduction of a NC without adequate lead time to resign and restructure your life (I'd say 1 year) can be illegal in certain states as it would be interpreted to be a bait and switch.
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Old 02-28-2018, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
2,961 posts, read 1,012,279 times
Reputation: 3776
Quote:
Originally Posted by damba View Post
You must live in a bubble.
He's been completely unable to grasp the concept since the first reply, lo these many weeks ago.
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Old 02-28-2018, 05:21 PM
 
2,360 posts, read 1,026,502 times
Reputation: 2071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
He's been completely unable to grasp the concept since the first reply, lo these many weeks ago.
I just dont see the good side of it all. Its like people (business) are afraid of competition at any level. Yea it may be good for business on paper, but not for the consumer. But then i have to keep reminding my self that business are not in it for the consumer, they are in it to make share holders happy, while screwing the consumer.
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