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Old 03-03-2018, 04:55 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
6,510 posts, read 3,785,914 times
Reputation: 4783

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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I am one who thinks that there actually is a national security issue. A concept that is part of globalization is to make countries so interdependent that war is impossible. That is an unobtainable goal, IMO. When an industry that would be crucial to defense becomes so weak and the infrastructure and knowledgeable workers so diminished that it can't ramp up immediately in wartime, we are in a boatload of trouble. In war, supply lines are cut and we could be at war or sanctioned by China or other countries. Just because we have had a history of shared relations with Canada, that does not mean that it will always be the case.

Steel is 20th century though. What I am much more concerned about are electronics coming from Korea and China. I look at the way my phone works, the permissions that have to be granted everywhere, and the fact that it is an artificially cheap product made in China - by a company with close ties to the Chinese government - and I think "What a fantastic information gathering device, and brilliant electronic fifth column that has the potential for destroying communications with a simple hidden deactivation command, built in at the factory."
Nonsense.

You are (the USA) getting finished products (ipads, etc) from China, not raw materials,
youíre getting a lot of that from friendly ally countries, donít start p*ssing your friends off,
then youíll really be on your own, maybe that is what you want, donít know, but you
are now heading in that direction.
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Old 03-03-2018, 05:30 AM
 
11,889 posts, read 14,355,740 times
Reputation: 7526
Some benefit for steel workers (largest production region: Northern Indiana). But bad for most other industries. One that surprised me: Zymurgy (beer brewing) due to higher cost of cans. And that's before countervailing tariffs.
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Old 03-03-2018, 06:12 AM
 
188 posts, read 89,574 times
Reputation: 550
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMI View Post
Nonsense.

You are (the USA) getting finished products (ipads, etc) from China, not raw materials,
youíre getting a lot of that from friendly ally countries, donít start p*ssing your friends off,
then youíll really be on your own, maybe that is what you want, donít know, but you
are now heading in that direction.
I started shaking uncontrollably after reading that.
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:26 AM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,477 posts, read 1,706,852 times
Reputation: 3269
I think a long term negative effect of a new tariff on imports would be upward pressure on inflation. Remember that by purchasing cheaper goods made in other countries we can artificially keep inflation low by utilizing the foreign labor to keep prices of goods in check.

I find it strange that the president went against all of his allies with his surprise announcement.
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Montreal
168 posts, read 110,529 times
Reputation: 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Trump plans a tariff on steel and aluminum. I read in other forum, this will make goods cost more for americans. But at the same time, our own steel industry makes more money.

So how do you decide if this bad idea, or good idea? Many other countries like India, and China have no concern for environment or labor. Should we even do business with them? Yeh, they cheap, but if we find it unacceptable to adopt their practices what is the point when we buy from them?
An increase of steel/aluminum prices will also reduce the competitiveness of American producers using such metals -resulting in net job losses in those sectors. Just look at how many people the auto, aviation and whatever else industries employ, what kind of jobs they offer to Americans, and their impact on American tech competitiveness, these tariffs become hard to fathom.

Why make a plane or a car destined for the international market inside the US, when the costs of materials are only higher in the US?

What's more, the USA actually doesn't import all that much steel from China. But the latter does flood the international market in terms of cheap steel driving prices down. So targeting one or two specific countries wouldn't work to prop up the domestic industry.
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Old 03-03-2018, 08:04 AM
 
3,174 posts, read 2,720,497 times
Reputation: 6477
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunslinger256 View Post

I find it strange that the president went against all of his allies with his surprise announcement.
Wilbur Ross and Peter Navarro were in favor of tariffs but almost everyone else was against the idea and Cohn and Mnuchin had advised against it. Apparently no one other than the President and possibly Ross knew he was going to make the announcement when he did.

From NBC;

"No one at the State Department, the Treasury Department or the Defense Department had been told that a new policy was about to be announced or given an opportunity to weigh in in advance.

.. reporters were invited to the Cabinet room. Without warning, Trump announced on the spot that he was imposing new strict tariffs on imports."
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Old 03-03-2018, 09:03 AM
 
1,025 posts, read 558,839 times
Reputation: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunslinger256 View Post
I think a long term negative effect of a new tariff on imports would be upward pressure on inflation. Remember that by purchasing cheaper goods made in other countries we can artificially keep inflation low by utilizing the foreign labor to keep prices of goods in check.

I find it strange that the president went against all of his allies with his surprise announcement.
Gunslinger256, we must keep USA wages in check. But rather than only promoting and increasing USA's trade deficits of goods, we should also completely open up our national borders and reduce or eliminate our need or expenses for U.S. customs and border patrol agents.
That would increase pressures upon our federal minimum wage laws and our median wage, thus much further reducing inflationary pressures upon the U.S. Dollar. Additionally, it would increase USA's incidences and extents of poverty, keeping USA employees more docile, submissive and fearful.

Respectfully, Supposn
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Old 03-03-2018, 10:26 AM
 
Location: la la land
27,151 posts, read 11,338,839 times
Reputation: 19270
Swedish appliance manufacturer pulls plug on $250 million Tennessee plant investment in retaliation for Trump tariffs

"According to Reuters, Swedish appliance manufacturer Electrolux announced on Friday that it will put off a plan to make a $250 million investment in a plant in Springfield, Tenn., after President Trump’s announcement of new tariffs on aluminum and steel. The report states that the company is waiting to see the final details of Trump’s proposed 25 percent tariffs on steel imports and 10 percent on aluminum imports before making a decision to once again proceed The company’s decision stands out because Electrolux already purchases all the steel it uses in its U.S. products domestically. “We are putting it on hold. We believe that tariffs could cause a pretty significant increase in the price of steel on the U.S. market,” company spokesman Daniel Frykholm said."
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Old 03-03-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,838 posts, read 51,286,023 times
Reputation: 27642
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
Swedish appliance manufacturer pulls plug on $250 million Tennessee plant investment in retaliation for Trump tariffs

"According to Reuters, Swedish appliance manufacturer Electrolux announced on Friday that it will put off a plan to make a $250 million investment in a plant in Springfield, Tenn., after President Trumpís announcement of new tariffs on aluminum and steel. The report states that the company is waiting to see the final details of Trumpís proposed 25 percent tariffs on steel imports and 10 percent on aluminum imports before making a decision to once again proceed The companyís decision stands out because Electrolux already purchases all the steel it uses in its U.S. products domestically. ďWe are putting it on hold. We believe that tariffs could cause a pretty significant increase in the price of steel on the U.S. market,Ē company spokesman Daniel Frykholm said."
Electrolux was sold to Aerus a number of years ago. I was glad I hadn't made my coffee before reading this, because I would have choked and spit. I have an older Electrolux, my parents had an Electrolux. I recently had to have a repair to the PLASTIC on/off switch support, and asked the repairman (who was sitting alone in the store the entire time I was there) how much a new Electrolux would cost. The answer? $1,400. This while Walmart is regularly selling vacs for less than $200. Sensitized to having heard that outrageous price and the unit having plastic parts that should have been metal, I found in a different CD forum that the new Electrolux models were even more plastic and according to one poster not worth the money.

The idea that a maker of overpriced vacuums that took a company OUT of the U.S. and began using PLASTIC parts is now "re-thinking" building a factory in the U.S. based on a tariff on aluminum and steel is frankly asinine posturing, picked up by the media for consumption by the gullible. If it can't make a profit because it pays a buck or two more for steel per unit, where is the low price to the consumer that every other maker seems to be able to manage?
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Old 03-03-2018, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,024 posts, read 346,275 times
Reputation: 907
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Trump plans a tariff on steel and aluminum. I read in other forum, this will make goods cost more for americans. But at the same time, our own steel industry makes more money.

So how do you decide if this bad idea, or good idea? Many other countries like India, and China have no concern for environment or labor. Should we even do business with them? Yeh, they cheap, but if we find it unacceptable to adopt their practices what is the point when we buy from them?

Now I hear we import mostly from Canada. What if we just tariff places like India and China only? They have terrible labor practices and environmental regulations.

Trump proposes tariffs on steel, aluminum imports - NY Daily News
Americans should be happy to pay more to support American jobs. Whatís wrong with you people? Thank you Trump, even though youíre a total jerk.
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