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Old 03-05-2018, 06:17 PM
 
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With all the tree hugging going on, why not force plastic companies to make their products biodegradable a mandatory thing now? Does it really cost that much more to make it degrade vs lasting 100 year on the shelf or in the ocean?
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Old 03-05-2018, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
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Probably won’t see it in the US but the EU is headed that direction with proposed ban on plastic straws.
For us I think there should be pressure put on retailers and manufacturers to voluntarily adopt these policies. There is no reason the blister packaging for most products can’t be recyclable.
Not sure about biodegradable though as the 1000s of uses of plastic may not be possible with corn-based plastics.
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Old 03-06-2018, 01:47 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
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Go down south sometime and talk to some farmers about what happened to the fertility of the soil after a century of growing biodegradable cotton.
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:07 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitpausebutton2 View Post
With all the tree hugging going on, why not force plastic companies to...
When I was a kid I remember Dad using newspapers to line the kitchen trash can.
No plastic bags.

Today... I use a much smaller can with a grocery store sack to line it.
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:13 AM
 
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Well, that's a "feels good" move, but wouldn't really have much impact (at a global scale). There are Much bigger fish to fry/more benefit for the dollar spent. Doesn't feel as good, costs money, won't happen.
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:15 AM
 
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Because they are expensive.
Because the production has a large environmental impact.
Because they do not perform well.
Because they do not biodegrade in landfills.
Because they get mixed in with other plastics and interfere with attempts to recycle.
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Old 03-08-2018, 12:07 PM
 
2,360 posts, read 1,027,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Because they are expensive.
Because the production has a large environmental impact.
Because they do not perform well.
Because they do not biodegrade in landfills.
Because they get mixed in with other plastics and interfere with attempts to recycle.
Does it really cost the manufacturing more to make or its just they refuse to do it?
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Old 03-08-2018, 01:55 PM
 
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Two cents for a plastic bag and 15 cents for an equivalent sized biodegradable bag.
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Old 03-08-2018, 05:22 PM
 
12,404 posts, read 9,199,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitpausebutton2 View Post
With all the tree hugging going on, why not force plastic companies to make their products biodegradable a mandatory thing now? Does it really cost that much more to make it degrade vs lasting 100 year on the shelf or in the ocean?
Not practical, until somebody invents biodegradable materials that can do everything non-biodegradables can, with the same properties and not insanely expensive. Even if many plastics could be replaced, some can't. And this means that a regulation of the kind you propose would need to have a number of exceptions, and then someone to oversee use to make sure the exceptions aren't being abused. In the end, it would be a bureaucratic nightmare, and drive up the cost of the necessary plastic products, including necessary lifesaving medical devices. Isn't healthcare overpriced enough as is?
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Old 03-08-2018, 05:45 PM
 
8,519 posts, read 2,389,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Go down south sometime and talk to some farmers about what happened to the fertility of the soil after a century of growing biodegradable cotton.
I don't see what this has to do with it. We can easily make plastic from corn (done already) and we have lots of excess corn and it is farmed properly.
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