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Old 03-21-2018, 08:19 PM
 
3,583 posts, read 1,507,792 times
Reputation: 9839

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
For those of you old enough to remember Jaqueline Kennedy...well, THAT was class!

If you're working for a living, you're not high class. If you haven't 'done' Europe, you aren't; if you didn't go to a private school as a child, you aren't; if you didn't learn to ride English and steer a sailboat in your childhood, you aren't. If there was no restriction on whom you married, you aren't.

People who go to public schools are not; people who are not WASP are not. They live differently than we do, eat differently, dress differently, and travel in different circles. They are not snobs. They may well run for political office, but never president (even JFK was not, but Jackie was).

To equate any of this with "income" would make most of them laugh....
Mostly I agree with you, but we have had a number of presidents and presidential candidates I would consider to have come from the upper class.


Washington
Jefferson
Madison??
Monroe??
William Henry Harrison???
Benjamin Harrison???
T. Roosevelt
F. Roosevelt
Adlai Stevenson???
Maybe George H.W.
Nelson Rockefeller
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Old 03-21-2018, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Phoenix-Valley of the Sun
2,461 posts, read 1,199,325 times
Reputation: 3046
Im sacramento, income over 73k is considered upper middle class with a household of 1 person.
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Old 03-21-2018, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,836 posts, read 51,286,023 times
Reputation: 27639
When I was growing up, people in the rarefied zone were referred to as belonging to one or more of these:
Jet-setters
Upper Crust
Country Club Set
Old Money

Upper class was noticeably absent from the vernacular in Vermont, except when referring to the rich in England. I suspect that had a lot to do with an active hatred of the English class system, handed down over generations. It didn't hurt that a few of the local farmers in stinky barn coats and worn manure-covered overalls could walk into a local car dealer and buy the most expensive car on the lot with a small part of a wad of cash that would make a cow choke.

As for "class," we learned early on that some people had it and some people didn't, and money was no indication of that attribute. One of the historians for the town noted that the gentleman who had the business of mucking out the outhouses around town and digging new pits when they became unusable was perhaps the cleanest and most God-fearing man in the area, always neat and precise in his work and once complete the most well-bathed and cleanly dressed man in church, with a vocabulary and demeanor to match. To me, someone like that has far more class than an "upper-class" martinet or snob.
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Old 03-21-2018, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
4,109 posts, read 3,400,520 times
Reputation: 5633
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Could not agree more. How are you upper class if you have to work for a living? It would make sense to base that on assets or something...Anyway this is america, we have no upper class. But a working stiff with 20k per year and $500 rent is just as much as a working stiff with $200K per year and 700K mortgage.
Actually no. Strictly by numbers
The stiff at $20k a year is spending 30% of his income on housing and the $200K a year stiff is spending 20% of the income on housing
Now while taxation is an issue, the bottom line is the poorer guy has $14K a year to live on and the richer guy has $160K a year to live on.
The poorer guy will have a hard time making ends meet, but the richer guy will make ends meet and have leftover money.
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Old 03-21-2018, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
4,109 posts, read 3,400,520 times
Reputation: 5633
Quote:
Originally Posted by phantompilot View Post
You shouldn't fall prey to that kind of thinking though. First its probably false when based on something as superficial as the vintage of your cars. Most people can't afford to BUY the cars that they drive..so its a false symbol of wealth in that the display of wealth is not an accurate indicator of actual wealth.

Secondly, the urge to compare yourself to others can lead to envy or jealously which are both unproductive and destructive emotions. We would all do well to try to keep these out of our repertoire. Not saying you are either of these things, but only that indulging or succumbing to these won't ever help you or anyone else.

I think its much more useful to look at what your work has yielded for you - how much you have saved, or how secure your source of income is, or how well-diversified your assets are, or your wealth-to-debt ratio, because those things measure your ability to withstand economic downturns.

If you own your house and your vehicles outright, even if they are worth less than the bigger houses and newer cars you might see, then you are in better shape than someone that does have either of those but is heavily mortgaged and doesn't own the car and is making big monthly lease payments on it. Because their wealth is illusory and yours is real. So of the two , you'd be in a higher/better position.
Yeah. You are right. Sometimes you just can't help it though.
I have to say that while I occasionally think of those things, I know I am very fortunate and thankful to be in my position
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Old 03-21-2018, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
4,109 posts, read 3,400,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 49erfan916 View Post
Im sacramento, income over 73k is considered upper middle class with a household of 1 person.
Where did you find this statistic?
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Old 03-21-2018, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
13,437 posts, read 15,036,253 times
Reputation: 11920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
The article didnít take into account of where you live, $100K doesnít go far in San Francisco nor would it be considered upper class.

Plus itís not how much you make, itís how much you keep. Some folks are living beyond their means and that money goes as fast as it comes (see broke professional athletes).
Yup, $100k if you're single and no kids you can at least be sort of middle-class... at least until you want to buy a house. Unless you're out in the outskirts of the Bay Area in decidedly not upper-class neighborhoods delusions of upper class, or even middle-class, on $100k evaporate very quickly. Unless of course you bought a house 20 years ago. Then much more of the Bay Area is doable. Median home price being well north of $1,000,000 on the Peninsula and South Bay even $200k won't feel so upper class. Plus any two-income household with people holding professional jobs is going to earn more than that anyway.
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Old 03-22-2018, 12:38 AM
 
24,692 posts, read 26,777,106 times
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I think this whole idea of upper class being based on income alone is wrong headed. I think net worth is a better indicator. But others would say non-monetary factors also come into play such as education, cultural attitudes and values, etc.
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Old 03-22-2018, 04:35 AM
 
2,240 posts, read 1,385,700 times
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It looks like I’m solidly upper class then, but I agree with #48. Especially, because since I’m still young, the net worth isn’t there yet with the high income.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RR6nTo_0lLg

Last edited by Thatsright19; 03-22-2018 at 05:09 AM..
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Old 03-22-2018, 06:07 AM
 
4,706 posts, read 2,251,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
To me, "upper income" means one could stop working now and never feel it
Isn't this more a reflection of accumulation of assets than income?

If someone is a VP of a big company with a 600k salary they are upper income by just about any definition, but it's entirely possible they're living an upper class lifestyle that consumes most of that income and they haven't been in the half-mil club long enough to support that lifestyle for long without the income stream.
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