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Old 03-22-2018, 11:27 AM
 
Location: New York
5 posts, read 3,057 times
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Toys R Us and Claire's have announced their closings this month as they are finding it hard to stay alive in the brick and mortar department. What are your speculations about the next retailers to meet the same fate this year?
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Old 03-22-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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I'd put nearly all the other "mall rat" stores at high risk. Kids don't shop in malls any more. Unless a chain has a strong online presence and is prepared to keep cutting losses on B&M stores, they'll go under in the next few years. Even at that, only the strongest will survive the ultimate competition of online - they aren't competing only against the other girly-girl t-shirt place across the plaza.

For that matter, pretty much any of the retailers who developed and grew as mall installations - selling one or two products like candles or baskets or boutique stuff no one would go more than two steps out of their way to patronize. If they haven't found a successful online foothold, kiss 'em goodbye.
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Old 03-22-2018, 12:41 PM
 
742 posts, read 802,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I'd put nearly all the other "mall rat" stores at high risk. Kids don't shop in malls any more. Unless a chain has a strong online presence and is prepared to keep cutting losses on B&M stores, they'll go under in the next few years. Even at that, only the strongest will survive the ultimate competition of online - they aren't competing only against the other girly-girl t-shirt place across the plaza.

For that matter, pretty much any of the retailers who developed and grew as mall installations - selling one or two products like candles or baskets or boutique stuff no one would go more than two steps out of their way to patronize. If they haven't found a successful online foothold, kiss 'em goodbye.
I agree. I'm in my late 20's and when I grew up my city of 500,000+ people and 2m+ in the county limits had 5 major malls and a few other smaller ones that were anchored around a movie theatre or Macy's. Now we have one single mall. Outside of Christmas and Black Friday that place is not very busy. However the mall still has near 100% occupancy. I place this simply on the fact that it's the only mall left.
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Old 03-22-2018, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UntilTheNDofTimE View Post
However the mall still has near 100% occupancy. I place this simply on the fact that it's the only mall left.
Is that 100% occupancy all retail? Or have end and corner spaces quietly turned into offices, bullpens, churches and the like? That's the usual progression when they know they can't find retailers to fill spaces but don't want any blank spots.
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:02 PM
 
9,082 posts, read 3,697,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Is that 100% occupancy all retail? Or have end and corner spaces quietly turned into offices, bullpens, churches and the like? That's the usual progression when they know they can't find retailers to fill spaces but don't want any blank spots.
should turn the old malls into schools, have metal detectors and cameras built in already, has food court and everything as else, even indoor playground
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:04 PM
 
742 posts, read 802,881 times
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Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Is that 100% occupancy all retail? Or have end and corner spaces quietly turned into offices, bullpens, churches and the like? That's the usual progression when they know they can't find retailers to fill spaces but don't want any blank spots.
This is an indoor mall so it's all retail.
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UntilTheNDofTimE View Post
This is an indoor mall so it's all retail.
Oh, it happens even indoors. The low-traffic corners get office space and things like business centers and other non-retail to keep the lights on and the view 'busy.' Then one day the whole place is cheap discount stores and churches separated by bullpen offices.
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:27 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,382 posts, read 50,562,503 times
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Our malls are doing great, even expanding, but there are vacant retail spaces are in smaller strip malls. The one nearest us has 3 vacancies. One has had real problems keeping a tenant, it was Tully's Coffee, then Gamestop, then a Cell phone store. The other near it was a restaurant that moved into a larger space down the road that was vacant for two years. The 3rd was a frozen yogurt shop that made the mistake of opening just after another opened across the street in another strip mall. If I had to guess I would say larger, non-mall anchor tenants are the next to go, those that are not near anything else to attract shoppers. Here that would be stores like Sears, Kohl's, Best Buy, GNC, Bed Bath & Beyond.
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
2,975 posts, read 1,012,279 times
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Seattle's pretty boom-boom-boom (and rainy), so I'd see malls surviving there longer. I don't see many commercial vacancies here, either, but there are an awful lot of storefront churches in the less boomy zones.

I am convinced that strip malls are built from a kit, and the last three boxes contain a cell phone store, a nail salon and a tiny insurance office.
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Old 03-22-2018, 02:32 PM
 
2,910 posts, read 2,861,708 times
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I used to think Amazon is the problem for the failing of retails and then I was enlightened. Most of these retail failed because they failed to innovate. Toys R Us still the same Toys R Us from 30 years ago when I was a kids. So any retailers failing to innovate will not escape the faith that the market has them eliminated.

I know some very smart people will eventually figure this out and we will see retailers of the future shortly.
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