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Old 03-24-2018, 09:52 PM
 
Location: EPWV
9,852 posts, read 5,775,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I'd say another part is the viability of the stores inside the malls themselves. We watched this with a mall near us in the 90s. Started out with the typical anchor stores, Sears on one end, Kmart the other, with Macy's and Mervyns in the middle opposite each other. With a pretty decent collection of stores in between, most locally run and focused. Over time the locally run stores that provided variety disappeared to be replaced by the standard mall stores all selling the same junk at high prices, which inevitably failed to be replaced by another standard mall stores selling the same junk. The two locally owned bookstores were replaced by a giant Borders. With nothing to buy, shopping within the mall fell off. People would shop at Sears, then get in their car and drive around to the other side to shop at Kmart. And so forth. And of course we all know what happened to Borders, Mervyns, Macy's, and Sears/Kmart.


Personally I think part of it of course on line shopping. But I also think a big part is the anchor and chain stores are so poorly managed. A lot of malls were built around the concept of Sears at one end and Penny's at the other to draw in customers and get them to walk from end to end and back again. Without those anchor stores, there's nothing in the middle to go to the mall for.
There was a really nice cafe that made excellent cakes and coffee. My spouse and I would go there occasionally to split a slice of their cake and have a cup of coffee or a cappuccino.I once bought one of their cakes for an office party. I was going to reserve a slice of the cake but by the time I came back into the office from another meeting, the cake was gone. That cafe stop was our priority. The anchor stores were secondary. Unfortunately, the malls charged the smaller stores (and our cafe) 2 or 3 times the rent of the anchors and after so many years of this, our fave cafe decided to move out of the mall. That was around the time that we moved away.
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Old 03-25-2018, 10:16 AM
 
Location: equator
2,604 posts, read 1,111,397 times
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Well, without mail service there's no Amazon, so malls here are doing quite well. Building big indoor ones for the treat of A/C. It's still a novelty for people here.


Back in Dallas last week, it looked like the outdoor malls were teeming with traffic but not the indoor ones. I'd sneak around to the end to go to Dillard's as I have to try clothes on, but avoid the rest of the mall. Then threaded our way through a massively crowded outdoor "mall" to find REI which are the clothes we actually live in.


I grew up around South Coast Plaza which I had thought was the first mall ever. I even dated the Segerstrom son (la di da! ). My CA relatives say it's doing quite well, still....?
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Old 03-25-2018, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,305 posts, read 10,044,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Well, without mail service there's no Amazon, so malls here are doing quite well. Building big indoor ones for the treat of A/C. It's still a novelty for people here.
The majority of my Amazon packages come via UPS. A few come via FedEx. There are other shipping options aside from the USPS.
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Old 03-25-2018, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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The demise of malls may be hastened by the structure of REITs, which need to pay out their proceeds to shareholders each year. So, an owner of several of the listed, Simon Property Group, has highly valued properties, but still has a lofty PE on top of it and pays out dividends. Banks still loan to SPG, so it can afford to modernize its malls into experience centers. The malls that exist to simply contains run of the mill mall stores are going to get hammered. Too many clothing stores, not enough stuff. Anchor tenants Sears, Kmart, JCPenney etc are all dead/dying. The model just doesn't work to sell commodities anymore.

Some of the malls here have taken large vacancies and used the space on upper floors to bring back nice theatres, bowling alleys, entertainment and promotion areas...as well as starting to utilize empty parking lots for events. It brings people back to the malls for reasons outside of buying clothes. They go from shopping malls to experience centers with shopping availability, but that takes money, and the REITs had to pay theirs out during the good times years ago.
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Old 03-25-2018, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
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lol, loves me some King of Prussia but I'm not a huge shopper. I do like that they have different stores
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Old 03-26-2018, 02:41 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
8,949 posts, read 3,114,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
I went into a mall for the first time in over twenty years last week------to use the lavatory.
LOL - that's awesome...
I don't like them either, probably make 2 appearances a year at a mall
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Old 03-26-2018, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,137 posts, read 7,387,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
I went into a mall for the first time in over twenty years last week------to use the lavatory.
I know what you mean. My wife and I go to the mall much more often than that, but not as often as years ago. She has to take her wedding ring in to the jewelry store in the mall twice a year for cleaning. There is still a decent volume of foot traffic, but every time we go in, many of these stores whose names we never heard of are gone, replaced by other equally unrecognizable stores. Most of them sell overpriced clothing marketed to teens and tweens.
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Old 03-26-2018, 09:49 AM
 
4,542 posts, read 11,542,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Went walking in a local mall recently. Over half the stores were closed, including two of the four anchor stores. Good many of the stores were actually things like places to experience virtual reality, a miniature train display, robotics classes, a couple military recruitment centers, various service stores -- a tailor, shoe repair, couple beauty and barber shops, a place to get your eyebrows threaded, place to bath your dog... --

The stores that were open had few or no shoppers. No one walking around with shopping bags.

I don't know how the stores that are still there stay in business.

How is that these huge malls are doing so much better?
Because the people who shop at these malls all have lots of $$$$.
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Old 03-26-2018, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,651 posts, read 1,885,330 times
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The only one I'm surprised didn't crack the Top 10 is Scottsdale Fashion Square. I saw an article a couple years ago that it was one of the most profitable malls in the country and was one of the highest in sales per square foot, and they've recently done an extensive renovation which added even more high end stores and conveniences. It's really the only true high end indoor mall in Arizona (there are a couple smaller outdoor ones like Biltmore Fashion Park, Kierland Commons, and Scottsdale Quarter but are probably too small to make a list like this).

I'm a little surprised Oak Brook Center was so high on the list. I used to live a couple mile from it and while it always had higher end stores it used to have plenty for average income shoppers, as well. It must have gone decidedly more upscale in the time I've been away.
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Old 03-26-2018, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Boston
5,097 posts, read 1,453,831 times
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haven't been in a mall in 20 years, so many are gone, I say good riddance
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