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Old 05-03-2018, 02:49 PM
 
2,621 posts, read 2,025,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anywhere but here View Post
Years ago people flocked to those kind of jobs, because they were not afraid to work and they needed a good job. Cry babies are what we have to choose from today.
They aren't cry babies, more people just value their time and quality of life more.
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Old 05-03-2018, 03:28 PM
 
4,036 posts, read 1,835,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by double6's View Post
this is a quote from the link you provided..
It is not a federal pension Because the money is put in there by the employees and the employer,the rail roads. The only involvement by the government is they oversee the funds. If you consider that a federal pension.....then you are right.
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Old 05-04-2018, 06:35 AM
 
3,720 posts, read 1,667,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anywhere but here View Post
Right, lets just stay lazy. Life is not pleasant and there should be no expectation it be pleasant. Getting participation trophies is one cause of this crap. Just like people who think that food magically appears at a store and have no idea what it takes to produce the product.
Life isn't pleasant? It should be. Life should be pleasant, happy, joyful. It would be an unimaginable disappointment if our existences are doomed to unavoidable struggle, strife and woe.

That doesn't mean your job should be pleasant, though. Most jobs range between stultifying and boring. Very few fall in the pleasant category and it takes a lot of work and planning to land one. A job that is useful, interesting and at which you can make a good living is the happy coincidence of necessity and inclination.

For the rest of us, work is a means to an end. If it provides a living. Then you can look for happiness in the rest of your life.

I guess these RR jobs are remunerative and useful. Expect anything more and you'll the opportunity presented.
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Old 05-05-2018, 01:07 PM
 
2,621 posts, read 2,025,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anywhere but here View Post
Right, lets just stay lazy. Life is not pleasant and there should be no expectation it be pleasant. Getting participation trophies is one cause of this crap. Just like people who think that food magically appears at a store and have no idea what it takes to produce the product.
If you can't have a pleasant life and be happy and enjoy it, there is no point to it. Sure, there are always problems, issues and challenges, but there is no reason to make it harder than it needs to be.
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Old 05-11-2018, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Sector 001
7,129 posts, read 5,944,806 times
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Signing bonuses are used because their base wages are so poor... trucking has lagged behind in pay worse than most areas...

https://www.overdriveonline.com/truc...analyst-stays/

"Its sad, especially when any trucker looking for a job is bombarded with and endless supply of ads from recruiters. Sign on bonus! Home weekly! bla bla bla. The majority of it is bogus to begin with. I mean who wants to be away from family and friends for months at a time, lonely in a small square box 99% of the time, and basically have NO life away from your truck for 40 grand a year? Ill go flip burgers at my local Mcdonalds. They start you off at 10 bucks an hour."

"Having been a trucker back in the 70s 80s and 90s I would have to agree. The cost of living and housing in particular. When I bought my first home in the 70s a home in a decent neighborhood in Anaheim Ca. was 70 thousand. That same home sold for 400 thousand during the peak of real estate in that area. That was in 2010 after the real estate crash. If you drive for a living and are on the road your average hourly rate should be computed by all hours spent in control of the truck. We all know that is not the case."

"It’s completely impossible to strike because we aren’t organized. Eventually trucking is going to become an unaffordable industry to be a part of (it’s already unaffordable) because of the mass growing influx of regulations and impossible conditions associated with the occupation, but this is why government wants to allow all those refugees from Syria to arrive in hordes. The government could keep hammering the industry, and then when veterans get completely sick of it all (like me), then they have their orchestrated plan to replace all of us with refugees and other illegals who are excited to make $0.05/mile with no benefits. It’s a win/win for everyone except for those pesky American Truckers, who are long gone (in my opinion). I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately, and will probably get into trouble for saying this, but the American Trucker is long gone. They have all retired and have been replaced by victims of a big CDL mill scam that turned out to be a big lie."

"Even driving as an O/O, You really don’t know what the load actually pays because the Broker will tell you anything. Brokers lie about the actual pay 95% of the time. That is technically stealing. There is actually a rule in the regulations manual that says a broker must tell you the actual gross rate they invoiced the shipper on the load you hauled but it is not required unless you to request that information from the broker. Well, if you’re crazy enough to request that then you’re done. That broker will black-ball you and you’ll never be able to haul from them again. Stupid clause. That info should be required and automatic on the rate confirmation page."

"Average Airline Pilot’s pay is around $135k a year. Average truck driver’s pay is around $60k a year. Pilot’s have hundreds of passengers to protect, driver’s have thousands of 4 wheelers to protect and watch out for each day. Pilot’s make less decisions in one mile than a driver. Without truck drivers, store shelves would be empty and chaos would happen. Finally, a truck driver’s job is always in the top 10 most dangerous jobs in America each year. I think we should be making the $111k a year or go on strike until we get it."
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Old 05-13-2018, 07:00 AM
 
3,720 posts, read 1,667,677 times
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The skills needed to fly a plane far exceed those to drive a truck. Truck driving is very hard but not very skill intensive.

My daughter drove a truck for a couple of years but quit because the conditions were so difficult: months on the road, isolation, boredom, lousy diet, etc. Now, if she had stuck it out for 5 years, things would have been different. She could have had the local trucking job of her choosing. Good money, 5 day weeks, home at night. Still hard, but jobs are supposed to be hard.

RR jobs are hard also. But as was said, no one ever drowned in sweat.

Hard work is good for young people. It tests, builds and disciplines them. They had a show on the History Channel or one of those stations, a long time ago, about building the Hoover Dam. The men who worked on it, from the common laborer to the top engineer, looked at the Hoover Dam as the crowning achievement of their lives. And it was. It made Las Vegas, Southern California, Phoenix, etc. possible (not to mention most of the fruit and vegetables we eat). Millions upon millions of peoples' lives were made better because of the work these men did. They were proud and justly so.

RR work is not as glorifying as building one of the world's wonders but doing it, seeing it through, should be a source of pride for workers just the same. As well as a way to make a good living.

I can't imagine programming computers or emptying bedpans could ever offer the same sense of satisfaction.
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Old 05-13-2018, 07:30 PM
 
4,036 posts, read 1,835,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
The skills needed to fly a plane far exceed those to drive a truck. Truck driving is very hard but not very skill intensive.

My daughter drove a truck for a couple of years but quit because the conditions were so difficult: months on the road, isolation, boredom, lousy diet, etc. Now, if she had stuck it out for 5 years, things would have been different. She could have had the local trucking job of her choosing. Good money, 5 day weeks, home at night. Still hard, but jobs are supposed to be hard.

RR jobs are hard also. But as was said, no one ever drowned in sweat.

Hard work is good for young people. It tests, builds and disciplines them. They had a show on the History Channel or one of those stations, a long time ago, about building the Hoover Dam. The men who worked on it, from the common laborer to the top engineer, looked at the Hoover Dam as the crowning achievement of their lives. And it was. It made Las Vegas, Southern California, Phoenix, etc. possible (not to mention most of the fruit and vegetables we eat). Millions upon millions of peoples' lives were made better because of the work these men did. They were proud and justly so.

RR work is not as glorifying as building one of the world's wonders but doing it, seeing it through, should be a source of pride for workers just the same. As well as a way to make a good living.

I can't imagine programming computers or emptying bedpans could ever offer the same sense of satisfaction.
After 37 years of maintaining railroad tracks........I know I saved at least a couple of trainmens lives. It was very hard physical work. Not very many could or would do it.There was more than a little pride in that.........
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Old 05-14-2018, 07:01 AM
 
3,720 posts, read 1,667,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffdoorgunner View Post
After 37 years of maintaining railroad tracks........I know I saved at least a couple of trainmens lives. It was very hard physical work. Not very many could or would do it.There was more than a little pride in that.........
I hope these RR bonuses wind up attracting a few youngsters who will have the same kind of experience you did Jeff. A lot of good will come out of it, for all involved.

"Come now to search you manhood
through all the thankless years;
Cold-edged with dear bought wisdom,
the judgement of your peers."
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Old 05-16-2018, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,282 posts, read 15,283,732 times
Reputation: 7029
Saw this today:

https://www.bizjournals.com/jacksonv...ees-about.html
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Old 05-16-2018, 03:02 PM
 
2,621 posts, read 2,025,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
And like most companies, instead of solving root issues, they are just going to drive their workforce farther into the ground and make matters worse.
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