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Old 04-30-2018, 10:23 AM
 
3,716 posts, read 1,666,317 times
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Railroads offering thousands of dollars in signing bonuses - KXAN

Here are more college jobs, good ones, that don't need college degrees. Starbucks baristas take note: you might yet be able to pay off you college loans.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,651 posts, read 1,885,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
Railroads offering thousands of dollars in signing bonuses - KXAN

Here are more college jobs, good ones, that don't need college degrees. Starbucks baristas take note: you might yet be able to pay off you college loans.
It's really tough work with very long hours. Like long haul truck drivers, you are often away from home for weeks at a time. Makes it difficult to maintain relationships or have a family, so I'm not surprised it's tough to attract younger people into it. That said, it can certainly be financially rewarding, and if you move up the ranks it's a pretty good gig. My older cousin started out as a brakeman and worked his way up into upper management, eventually as CEO of a couple different railroads.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:38 AM
 
2,240 posts, read 1,385,700 times
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I’ve been working on the railroad
All the live long day

I’ve been working on the railroad
Just to pass the time away
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Old 04-30-2018, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,280 posts, read 1,033,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
Railroads offering thousands of dollars in signing bonuses - KXAN

Here are more college jobs, good ones, that don't need college degrees. Starbucks baristas take note: you might yet be able to pay off you college loans.
careful now, I'm looking through this and quite a number of these jobs do require either college education or trade.
Electricians
applications developers
Assitant general attorney

You're not rolling out of Starbucks into these jobs.

lol, why are they always located in places that get subartic cold.
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Old 04-30-2018, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
20,947 posts, read 15,267,317 times
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Railroads are also notorious for layoffs and rehiring. It's an inherently unstable industry.
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Old 04-30-2018, 11:45 AM
 
3,457 posts, read 1,978,113 times
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I enjoy railroads.
Model railroading, watching trains and railroad equipment at work, my OH and I chase vintage diesel and steam locomotives still operating, and ride on them in vintage RR cars.

But I've learned I wouldn't, in fact couldn't work on one, even modern equipment.

So, no, I won't be ....workin' on the railroad, all the live long day...

Not even....just to pass the time away...

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Old 04-30-2018, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna.
11,361 posts, read 6,783,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
careful now, I'm looking through this and quite a number of these jobs do require either college education or trade.
Electricians
applications developers
Assitant general attorney

You're not rolling out of Starbucks into these jobs.

lol, why are they always located in places that get subartic cold.
If you don't have mechanical or technical skills, you can hire out as a freight crewman (formerly called a brakeman) since road crews are usually down to two people -- engineer and conductor. And in a break with tradition, the engineer is again in charge.

Promotion to engineer usually happens within a few years of hiring. Those who qualify can look forward to paychecks of $100K or better only a year or two "down the road (track?)" BUT BE ADVISED: This is a rough, very-high-demand occupation:

New hires work what's called the "extra board" -- subject to a call to work on two hours' notice at any hour of the day or night. If your home base is on a line with light, or fairly-predictable traffic, you can usually discern a pattern that will enable you to determine when you'll get your next call -- most of the time. But if you're based at a "railroad town" (Altoona, PA used to be the most famous, but that mantle has been taken up by North Platte, NE, and North Platte can occasionally get plenty cold in the dead of winter), the day will come when you'll get a call after you've been up for twelve hours or more, and the cab of a freight loping along at 20 MPH late at night is very much a sleep-inducing environment.

And another thing to keep in mind: You're working with very large weights and distances; freight trains can carry up to 20,000 tons and be up to 10,000 feet (two miles) long. And as highway crossings continue to be eliminated, the pressure is on to increase those limits.

This has serious implications for safety issues; a severed finger can be reattached, but a limb crushed by heavy machinery leaves the surgeon no choice but to amputate. Accidents, while extremely ugly, are rare, but the nature of the operation can cause you to devolve toward obsessive/compulsive behavior, because everything is essentially scripted; snowflakes take note -- there's very little leeway to adjust the job to fit your fit your preferred personal style of living and working.

And this also has consequences for spouses and children; there's an aphorism that the anagram "BNSF" (Burlington Northern Santa Fe) also means "Best Not to Start a Family".

But having pointed all this out, I'll also say that for a lot of us -- and particularly those who can't accept the "power games" and constant self-effacement of a back-row desk in a large office, tied to a "big, long first period", and dealing constantly with the unrealistic demands of that charming critter called "the public"; those who like the recognition symbols and not-always-written code of a small-and-exclusive club (can't call it a "fraternity" any more), it can be one of the most satisfying occupations in the world.

And if not ..... it gets old quickly.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4yj5-uErJ4

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 04-30-2018 at 01:40 PM..
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Old 04-30-2018, 12:42 PM
 
10,696 posts, read 20,114,276 times
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I know a guy who worked RR for a few years to pay for his flight training. He's at an airline now with no debt. Great plan and yes it is hard work, you are compensated for it. Do it a few years to set yourself up for the future if you can't handle or don't like the long term lifestyle.

But, complaining about your dead end job is a lot easier.
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Old 04-30-2018, 02:01 PM
 
6,996 posts, read 6,629,325 times
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Anything to do with logistics and supply chain is currently booming. Truck drivers, railroad, warehouse workers, etc. Most of the jobs are low pay with the distribution centers located out in the country, such as Lehigh, Pennsylvania. The trend toward home delivery with very short delivery times requires there be a logistical hub in every state with access to airports and major highways. It's been going on for several years in Japan to where the costs are rising.
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Old 04-30-2018, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte FL
908 posts, read 519,793 times
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and ya get a federal pension..I think the average is around $3,500 a month or more..
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