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Old 06-02-2018, 09:30 PM
 
18,242 posts, read 11,645,412 times
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Americans aren't drinking enough milk, and competition is forcing changes.


https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/01/dair...lk-market.html
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Old 06-02-2018, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,483 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Well, I do my share. I like dairy products, including milk.
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Old 06-18-2018, 07:30 AM
 
12,422 posts, read 14,553,508 times
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I won't be buying ANY milk from a walmart.
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Old 06-18-2018, 12:13 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,785 posts, read 37,451,783 times
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USA Personal consumption has pretty minimal impact on the HUGE USA Dairy industry (of which USA enjoys CHEAP prices, VERY CHEAP (far less than cost of production / transport to the grocery shelf/ subsidies... +/-)

Now we have Tariffs / trade war !

Not a good time to be a dairy farmer. (or ANY farmer... as usual...)

nothing is for free... freedom or prosperity or sustainable solutions.

Walmart / big box ruins a LOT of decades old / generational / family / independent businesses. (and significantly reduces our (consumer) choice. Ruining a family farm is disastrous to decades & generations of lifestyle / economy / ecology. You just don't 'pack-up' a farm and move away.. It takes DECADES to build soils / conservation / orchards / barns / water systems / fences. BTDT 3x in my life and same with my predecessors.

There are other (better) options for consumers, producers / communities.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:02 PM
 
1,025 posts, read 559,196 times
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Can a group member please explain or link me to an explanation of the current method for federal price supports of agricultural commodities?

I've been browsing through the 1946 – 1952 volume of Truman's autobiographies and I read his too brief explanation of the then Secretary of Agriculture Charles Brannan's proposed price support method. I understood his reasoning for pegging all other of farm those commodities to the price of corn. I currently don't wish to discuss that reasoning.

I'm interested in his goal to provide payments sufficient for smaller sized farms rather than providing for large-scale agricultural “factories”.
How could the federal government administer those payments to prevent large landowners from sub-dividing their acreage in manners as to qualify each sub-division to its full extent of federal benefits? Isn't in comparatively simple to conceal commercial association between individual landowners or individual enterprises leasing or owning farmland?

Post within this thread
or to Farm price supports? .
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:14 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,096 posts, read 3,386,997 times
Reputation: 8646
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
USA Personal consumption has pretty minimal impact on the HUGE USA Dairy industry (of which USA enjoys CHEAP prices, VERY CHEAP (far less than cost of production / transport to the grocery shelf/ subsidies... +/-)

Now we have Tariffs / trade war!

This is a serious situation and I think I can safely say there are many Americans who are not happy about it...although I could be wrong about that.

Not a good time to be a dairy farmer. (or ANY farmer... as usual...)

Agree

nothing is for free... freedom or prosperity or sustainable solutions.

Walmart / big box ruins a LOT of decades old / generational / family / independent businesses. (and significantly reduces our (consumer) choice. Ruining a family farm is disastrous to decades & generations of lifestyle / economy / ecology. You just don't 'pack-up' a farm and move away.. It takes DECADES to build soils / conservation / orchards / barns / water systems / fences. BTDT 3x in my life and same with my predecessors.

There are other (better) options for consumers, producers / communities.

SR, please share your thoughts with us on this as I would like to know what you believe the "other (better) options" are for all concerned, sincerely I am curious to know.
Hopefully the current adminstration will come to see the error of their ways and redeem themselves...if that's even possible.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:36 PM
 
5,600 posts, read 4,206,197 times
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I cannot understand why there should be any agricultural subsidies. That just seems like pork barrel politics at its worst. The agricultural industry has ripped off the taxpayer more than enough. Nor do I understand why anyone is upset with Walmart or another business that operates more efficiently and reduces costs for the consumer. That is the way progress occurs.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Johnson city, ny
90 posts, read 29,337 times
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My family has owned a large dairy farm for generations in Batavia, NY. I would say that they've always been taking hits and they are actually the only supplier for any of the area. They own around 14000 acres with several different roads the family lives on that each takes care of hundreds of cows and calves daily.

I can't think of a time it hasn't been a struggle although it has been in the past much worse then now. I believe it was back in the 80's when it went down for them a couple years and they were able to get a grant to keep supplying to the area. It's a fairly small town however and they work harder then I've known anyone to work. My uncle pat passed away about 6 years ago and they had a tribute to him as the oldest owner, third generation and one to keep the family going. I still tear up at the amazing tribute he was given by the town at his funeral.

It can be a different story depending on the areas and I do notice that moving up from the south, milk is about half the price here vs the $3 in Fl. However, I have been in touch with the family here in NY and they are doing well-not booming but that really hasn't happened in quite a few decades.
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Old 06-18-2018, 02:28 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,785 posts, read 37,451,783 times
Reputation: 20772
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I cannot understand why there should be any agricultural subsidies. That just seems like pork barrel politics at its worst. The agricultural industry has ripped off the taxpayer more than enough. Nor do I understand why anyone is upset with Walmart or another business that operates more efficiently and reduces costs for the consumer. That is the way progress occurs.
Yeah, I'm not keen on Gov intervention, but... we end up with an entire infrastructure / economy built on Gov interference. So at some point you need to 'rebuild (painful). Dairy did it in the 1980's, (buy-out) but still did not complete the process.

today... new regulations (EPA) add much overhead (cost and time), thus 80% of our state's dairies have closed or had to relocate to another state.

For Big Box... / efficiencies... it becomes a way of perspective / cost of supporting a community. (of aggregate benefit) Many of my business clients (and family) have lost their generational small businesses to "Big Box". (I volunteer with (3) USDA / SBA agencies)

+/- for consumers... GREAT for a affuenza / throw-away society and culture. but miserable for sustainable / practical consumers.
1) big box stores do not live in your town of 300 people, and your local grocery and hardware cannot survive if Big box < than 30 minutes away. Driving one hour to a Big Box for a repair part for your 30 yr old appliance or farm implement (which they will not have) is not reasonable. Nor is driving there for a gal of milk.
2) Try to get a local Big Box to support your school or children's club? (must go to corporate philanthropy and 'petition' with millions(?) of other requests)
3) You want your kid to have a great 'entry job during Jr High and HS ((like you had to grow your skills...) Not allowable at a Big Box
4) You want to have a retailer looking out for your needs / personal condition / financial burdens (in case you need home delivery while infirmed) Not allowable at a Big Box
5) you have a 'off -hour' need at 3AM (sick kid / parent / animal / broken well...), your local businessman (now broke and working at Walmart for $9/hr to pay off $300k in business debt) is no longer a business owner (where he was VERY content to support the community and your family likely for LESS than $9/ hr, but he had a very 'Special' contribution to the well being of the community / neighbors / friends...)

So Big Box = +/-, but certainly not good for ALL, and a disaster for small businesses, towns, communities.

BTDT for 40 yrs of slow DEATH of viable communities across the USA (and now spreading abroad).

Is all that a great idea, so I can buy a $129 chinsy plastic TV / appliance that will break in a yr and end up in a landfill? So I can save 10% on 'preservative / chemically enhanced' groceries, brought 10,000 miles of transport, picked by slaves / underpaid families?

Rough situation for all. Be the consumer you can sleep / live with and answer to your local communities economic and cultural (and physical) health.

We all appreciate a 'good deal', but it comes at a (great) cost to others.

Read the article, as if you were a dairy farmer with $1m operating capital loan due (or you will lose your HOUSE and your business and forced to sell $2m of equipment you will NEVER be able to replace) and leave a farm your great grandfather sweated through the depression to pay off (2 or 3 x).

Farming is a 'one-way' trip. You lose the game (ONE YEAR); you are not back to square one. You are 'sentenced' to moving your screaming kids and family to the suburbs so you can get a 'menial' job to pay of your $1m 'farming obligation' AND likely need to find a home for your aging parents, and jobs for your hired help and extended family, and the 20 - 50 businesses that daily served your operation. When the county fair comes... you will be selling Snow Cones in a sweaty booth, rather than shoveling manure in the livestock barn. (+/-)

We could re-build the 'system' starting with public schools / health Care / USDA... lots of great opportunities to 're-invent!' Join the effort!
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Old 06-18-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,297 posts, read 3,474,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I cannot understand why there should be any agricultural subsidies.
I'm fine with agricultural subsidies to ensure the US will always produce enough food to feed itself. But I can't see favoring one agricultural product (in this case, corn) over others.
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