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Old 06-26-2018, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,981 posts, read 32,696,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
I agree that the polling was sloppy - newspapers aren't known for good polling - but do you disagree with the broad implications? Do you think lower-income people in the suburbs would be more inclined to favor zoning?
I think that property owners have the right and morally the responsibility to safeguard their investments as long as civil rights of others are not violated.

 
Old 06-26-2018, 08:54 AM
 
847 posts, read 360,929 times
Reputation: 875
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Didn't you hear? My internet is no longer impaired. The sex offender from whom I, as a subtenant, was renting a room, got evicted for nonpayment of rent. (He collected rent from the rest of us but blew the money instead of paying the landlord.) As the house needed a LOT of work - furnace was inoperative and the kitchen stove became the source of heat - the landlord decided it was a great time to fix up the house, remodel, and return it to market at 2x the old rent. So I moved, got my own internet, and it works great.

But yeah, I think you nailed it. The bedrooms here are all painfully small, like maybe 75 sq ft, so it's likely the rooms are not allowed to have a second occupant.
so now you an sell your skin mags, make the ton of money you were expecting to make, stop paying for a storage unit, generate down payment money for a house so you won't be blighted as a renter any more?!?!?!?
 
Old 06-26-2018, 09:01 AM
 
3,970 posts, read 1,599,172 times
Reputation: 12409
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
My point is that most of them can't. If you spent some time mingling with the unwashed masses you would find that most low wage earners who are young and healthy don't bother with a second or third job, but resort to working under the table to augment their income, i.e. cleaning housing, babysitting or offering to do handyman type tasks. The problem with that is that those jobs are not predictable or stable so you end up with people never having a predictable enough income to rent an apartment, they are also not useful to the economy because no payroll taxes are paid on those wages.

The other problem in managing two or more part time jobs is childcare. A single parent will generally try to work during the times when they have a family member willing to watch the kids or when they are in school. Childcare can cost as much as a low wage worker earns.

These are complex problems not solved by 'one size fits all' solutions. Maybe instead of giving aid to Israel and some of these other countries where their citizens have better standards of living than our own poor do, we should spend some money on direct childcare subsidies for low income families and finding a way to incentivize businesses to give workers regular days off and hours so that they can juggle multiple jobs.
The United States puts untold billions into helping the poor in this country. We could double the amount and there would still be people who were complaining.

About ten years ago, I consulted for a housing authority. One aspect of my consultancy was to interview 100 residents of the housing project. The results were eye-opening. Roughly 50% used public housing in the way it was intended: Short-term housing for those who ran into a rough patch. I met one mother of three who lost everything in a fire. Another person who had to file bankruptcy after a divorce.

Then there was the 50% who were long-term residents. Most didn't even try to say they were looking for a way out. I met one woman who had literally been in the project for 50 years. Never held a job of any description even though she was of sound mind and body. Another guy showed me in pretty detailed fashion how he could cobble together government assistance and some under-the-table cash for mowing grass, et al, and not have to work more than ten-fifteen hours a week. A third had just finished his morning jog, and was talking about how he managed to game disability. On the last guy, had I not signed a confidentiality agreement, I would cheerfully have turned his ass in. It was my pocket he was picking after all.

The first group, I wholeheartedly support helping. The second group? No.

On your list, you mention single parents with a couple of kids. Were they ever in a committed relationship? When I was doing that consulting gig, I ran into more than one single mom who was in her early twenties, yet had a couple of kids and zero idea where to find the father(s). I mean, the last time I checked, everybody knows what causes pregnancy and there are plenty of places where you can obtain free or incredibly cheap birth control. To what extent are we responsible for the bad decisions of others?

Back to my original point. No one is automatically entitled to a dwelling place of their own, and the number of adults earning minimum wage working a full-time gig borders on infinitessimal. And if you have made it to your thirties and don't have some medical condition to your name, you should have acquired the basic skills, education, and trustiworthiness to expect higher pay.
 
Old 06-26-2018, 09:05 AM
 
15,394 posts, read 8,686,874 times
Reputation: 13777
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Didn't you hear? My internet is no longer impaired. The sex offender from whom I, as a subtenant, was renting a room, got evicted for nonpayment of rent. (He collected rent from the rest of us but blew the money instead of paying the landlord.) As the house needed a LOT of work - furnace was inoperative and the kitchen stove became the source of heat - the landlord decided it was a great time to fix up the house, remodel, and return it to market at 2x the old rent. So I moved, got my own internet, and it works great.

But yeah, I think you nailed it. The bedrooms here are all painfully small, like maybe 75 sq ft, so it's likely the rooms are not allowed to have a second occupant.
And handily, still give you a built in excuse as to why you can't make $100,000 a year.
 
Old 06-26-2018, 09:08 AM
 
15,616 posts, read 9,162,577 times
Reputation: 67792
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