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Old 07-02-2018, 06:01 PM
 
Location: SoCal
1,736 posts, read 1,788,674 times
Reputation: 1300

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I am all for it!! America has always rooted for the underdog, but China is not the underdog anymore!

I wish we could have addressed this problem before it became such a large problem.

I'm more than happy to pay more for stuff we don't need to make sure america is treated fairly.
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Old 07-02-2018, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
11,039 posts, read 11,450,778 times
Reputation: 17196
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
OP, the US budget is more complicated than "tariffs mean more revenue."

Case in point. The trade war will mean foreign countries will go after US farmers. Now, the US government has to spend even MORE money to offset the trade war. That's a net loss.

Trump Administration Considering 'Tariff Payments' to Farmers

All that talk about steel and steel jobs...not going to happen.
Agricultural sales are relatively inelastic. Demand for coarse grains has been steadily expanding about 3% a year. Currently, production is not meeting utilization, but reserves are adequate. If you take US production out of the mix, the world would be in a world of hurt. The US exports about 5% of the world food supply. If Argentina sells all their grain to China, Argentina's customers will trade with the US.

Hog farmers will get hurt if we get into a rassling match with China. Chicken farmers will just cut back production. China has never been a major market for US beef.

We import over half a trillion dollars of goods from China every year. A broad tariff would be a substantial boost to the US Treasury. The people who would get stroked are the Waltons and Harbor Fraught. Those retailers get almost all their inventory from China. They might close some stores. Yawn.
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Old 07-03-2018, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
8,951 posts, read 3,114,068 times
Reputation: 7045
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Tariffs are one of the exquisitely rare ideas in economics, which have all downside and zero upside. Nobody benefits - not producers, not consumers, not even middlemen.
Disagree - somebody always wins and somebody always loses, no matter what the government does.
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Old 07-03-2018, 08:37 AM
 
8,277 posts, read 3,452,461 times
Reputation: 1584
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerGeek40 View Post
Disagree - somebody always wins and somebody always loses, no matter what the government does.
These tariffs are focused, so those industries will be affected. Tending to favor the home production side, and adverse to the related importers. It gets so complicated as so much production here relies on imported stuff.
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Old 07-04-2018, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
2,744 posts, read 1,207,954 times
Reputation: 5039
Only about 10% of China's land is arable and it's in decline due to pollution. It's a country that can't feed itself and with a huge population that will drive market prices if it cuts out the US.

Unfortunately, it's also a country in modern times that has shown its very willing to the starve off its population.

Huge win yesterday in Europe rejecting China's call to have a trade alliance against the US. They aren't happy with POTUS, but despite a different approach and hate of the tactics employed, they're not disagreeing with the overall pain points.
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Old 07-05-2018, 11:18 PM
 
Location: ATX/Houston
1,817 posts, read 468,238 times
Reputation: 437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
Agricultural sales are relatively inelastic. Demand for coarse grains has been steadily expanding about 3% a year. Currently, production is not meeting utilization, but reserves are adequate. If you take US production out of the mix, the world would be in a world of hurt. The US exports about 5% of the world food supply. If Argentina sells all their grain to China, Argentina's customers will trade with the US.

Hog farmers will get hurt if we get into a rassling match with China. Chicken farmers will just cut back production. China has never been a major market for US beef.

We import over half a trillion dollars of goods from China every year. A broad tariff would be a substantial boost to the US Treasury. The people who would get stroked are the Waltons and Harbor Fraught. Those retailers get almost all their inventory from China. They might close some stores. Yawn.

On top of that, the O&G sector needs steel to build pipelines to fix the bottlenecks in the Permian Basin.
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Old 07-06-2018, 03:14 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
11,039 posts, read 11,450,778 times
Reputation: 17196
Quote:
Originally Posted by okcthunder1945 View Post
On top of that, the O&G sector needs steel to build pipelines to fix the bottlenecks in the Permian Basin.
That's not affected by tariffs. All of the pipeline steel is made in America. It was one of Trump's campaign promises.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:20 AM
 
259 posts, read 199,500 times
Reputation: 257
Domestic steel prices will go up due to demand, up to the point of the tariff increase. Domestic steel production can't just ramp up that quickly. So the increased price will linger for years at least, if not indefinitely while the tariffs are in place.
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Old 07-06-2018, 09:58 AM
 
Location: NC
6,081 posts, read 7,023,877 times
Reputation: 12054
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeddy View Post
these tariffs are a drop in the bucket to our economy
Or more accurately, a hole in the bucket.
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