U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-06-2018, 03:44 PM
 
1,461 posts, read 330,127 times
Reputation: 1663

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
As someone who ran a department, had a family and lived 35 miles away, my 8+ hour days plus extra time on projects
All of these things you brought on yourself, no?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-06-2018, 03:46 PM
 
Location: DFW
6,716 posts, read 11,162,972 times
Reputation: 4972
In general, if you don't fit in with the culture of the people you're working with, it's best to keep the differences to yourself and strive to do the best job possible. Even if you're doing excellent work, if you're constantly judging others (like over the blue hair for example) or starting arguments over your differences, you're not gonna be there for long as others won't like working for you. Conversely, if your cultural differences make it tough for you to communicate with the rest of the team (say they prefer emailing and Slack while you prefer the phone and face to face) it could also impact how much you contribute to the team which also jeopardizes your job.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2018, 07:58 AM
 
17,202 posts, read 14,805,597 times
Reputation: 32762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reefmonkey View Post
Are you over 40? If so you might be able to go for an age discrimination lawsuit under The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA). File a Charge of Discrimination with the EEOC


https://www.eeoc.gov/employees/charge.cfm


You have 180 days to take action, but if you are going this route I would recommend doing so now, even before you file for unemployment. It could help you if your former employer tried to block your unemployment benefits by claiming they fired you for cause (though the burden on them to prove cause to block unemployment benefits is fairly high). An EEOC complaint is a lot less difficult and expensive to go through than a lawsuit, and a lawyer is probably going to tell you to get that on file first. If EEOC finds proof of discrimination, that would make a lawsuit a lot easier.


Not that I am recommending a lawsuit. I worked for a company where I was the victim of workplace bullying an overall toxic environment, and discrimination for not being Japanese in a Japanese company. I guess I could have tried to sue, but moving on, forgetting about them and getting a job I've had for 6+ years and love was a far better investment in my time and emotional well-being. In your case, if you are over 40, I'd file the EEOC complaint and leave it at that. Not because you're looking for money, but because they shouldn't get away with it if that is what happened here.
They hired him knowing he was over 40 and much older than the other workers. So obviously its not age discrimination. Iím guessing it was something in his attitude or how he related to the team that just did not work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2018, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,559 posts, read 827,125 times
Reputation: 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reefmonkey View Post
At least you've backed off somewhat from "virtually impossible". I'm not sure how "extremely unlikely" it really is, since in my 20 years of post college working, I've seen new hires placed under the wing of someone only slightly senior to them who had no involvement in their hiring more times than I can count. And I have seen strong personality conflicts take place in such pairings more than a few times. I've even been in one of those personality conflicts early in my career, and was badmouthed to management by my "supervisor" who had only been on the job 3 months longer than me. He was REALLY pissed a year later when I finished my masters and got the same promotion he did at the same time.



I would hope any discrimination would be extremely unlikely in this day and age, but given the number of people who start a new job every day, the law of truly large numbers would mean even the extremely unlikely is going to happen from time to time. I don't know if this is or is not one of those times, but as this is just a casual online discussion forum, I don't see the harm in discussing possible scenarios, or why some people are so opposed to doing so.
My opinion comes from 20 + years HR that has dealt directly with discriminatory charges and have sat through mediation and settlement. I've never seen someone go through three interviews where the hiring manager wasn't part of the hiring decision.

Possible? Sure, but highly unlikely and unless the OP shares further information not worth the time, effort, and money to pursue.

I think the best input to offer is realistic expectation, pursuing a a strong discrimination charge is very draining, a weak case can be devastating.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2018, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Boston
5,097 posts, read 1,453,831 times
Reputation: 3733
Age discrimination, based on what? Go talk to an attorney, if he wants to take your case on contingency, do it, he believes you may have something, if he wants to take it on an hourly scale he thinks you have no case. Most lawyers will tell you that you have no case on the first visit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2018, 02:18 PM
 
8,374 posts, read 7,362,552 times
Reputation: 18229
The way the OP talks about the other workers, it is very plain he did not fit in with them, and made them uncomfortable to be around him. When you work with people you think are freaks, you are going to act that way with them with a superior attitude. In turn you are going to make them uncomfortable, which means you are not a good fit. If they were discriminating for your age, they would never have hired you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
20,947 posts, read 15,267,317 times
Reputation: 23722
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
Branal, "bad corporate fit" is a euphemism for "not a good worker".

It sounds like you don't know why you were fired. You certainly weren't fired because the other employees had piercings and dyed hair.

I would suggest you go into HR and ask what you should put on your resume - get help with wording. And ASK what happened - what the problem was if you actually don't know.
It's unlikely they actual reason would ever be disclosed, especially once the employee is terminated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2018, 03:40 PM
 
5,598 posts, read 4,204,310 times
Reputation: 10552
It seems the OP agrees he was a bad fit. The disagreement seems to be that he believes the company is to blame and owes him something. They attempted due diligence with a multiple interview hiring process and still lost.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2018, 06:16 AM
 
1,063 posts, read 322,840 times
Reputation: 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
It seems the OP agrees he was a bad fit. The disagreement seems to be that he believes the company is to blame and owes him something. They attempted due diligence with a multiple interview hiring process and still lost.
That to me indicates an incompetent employer
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2018, 08:37 AM
 
5,598 posts, read 4,204,310 times
Reputation: 10552
Quote:
Originally Posted by MechaMan View Post
That to me indicates an incompetent employer
Not really. Have you ever been in the position of doing much hiring? It is very difficult to determine how someone will perform and work out on the job. All sorts of approaches have been tried for interviewing and selection. None are perfect.


Secondly, unemployment is extremely low. Most companies are scraping the bottom of the barrel when it comes to finding potential applicants and hiring. The bottom of the labor market is typically filled with psychopaths, criminals, drug abusers and the like. After eliminating the worst applicants, companies often have no one left to hire.


And, finally, what about the applicant's responsibility? When I interviewed to obtain employment, I tried to make a favorable impression, but I also tried to learn as much as possible about the job requirements and work environment. I interviewed potential bosses as seriously as they interviewed me. The applicant knows better than anyone else if they will fit in. For some of us working with young people or working for a young boss can be enjoyable and stimulating. Others don't fit in and often are upset working for someone younger.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top