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Old 07-24-2018, 06:09 AM
 
Location: NY in body, Mayberry in spirit.
2,551 posts, read 1,625,019 times
Reputation: 5818

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jobster View Post
Lol.

I'm sure 30 year old's are thrilled at the prospect of having children in a world where 58% of the wildlife on the planet was exterminated in the past 40 years and we have entered the sixth extinction with absolutely no sign of slowing down.

Worse, this behavior is encouraged by the system.

Additionally, human labor capital will continue to be replaced with technology. It's a massive threat that will one day encompass, perhaps every single human labor category.

Then we get these clearly biased and complacent comments from baby boomers who cannot wrap their head around how the world is changing and instead are shaking their fists at immigrants on television and trying to deny people health care.

Thanks for this.
Guess you need to find a safe space.
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Old 07-24-2018, 07:22 AM
 
Location: USA
6,171 posts, read 4,950,686 times
Reputation: 10547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
A lot of moving parts here.

I'm 32. I graduated college in 2010 at 24 in Tennessee. About $9,000 of student debt. At the time, almost no one was hiring locally, and I was too far away from major job centers to get any interest. It took four years to get my first "career track" job, and my first "staff level" job didn't come until I was 30. I made $15/hr or less most of those first four years. I don't care who you are or where you are - surviving on $12/hr-$15/hr isn't easy.

I had to move from Tennessee to two Midwestern states to even get that first viable job. That was expensive. With all that moving around, it's difficult to get involved in a serious romantic relationship, or heaven forbid, have a kid and jerk them around between different schools. I've had numerous relationships, but have never had a live-in romantic partner or been married.

They also had the "luxury" of not having to relocate to find employment. Homes were more affordable relative to income. At the time, property in our local area appreciated better - today, you're lucky to appreciate above inflation in this part of Tennessee.
Yeah, more and more people are being forced to relocate to quite high COL areas in search of work. Many of them don't make it and become part of the growing homeless population.

Mostly gone are the days where good paying work in a cheap small town or rural place was widely available.
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Old 07-24-2018, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,362 posts, read 7,121,412 times
Reputation: 31058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
A lot of moving parts here.

I'm 32. I graduated college in 2010 at 24 in Tennessee. About $9,000 of student debt. At the time, almost no one was hiring locally, and I was too far away from major job centers to get any interest. It took four years to get my first "career track" job, and my first "staff level" job didn't come until I was 30. I made $15/hr or less most of those first four years. I don't care who you are or where you are - surviving on $12/hr-$15/hr isn't easy.

I had to move from Tennessee to two Midwestern states to even get that first viable job. That was expensive. With all that moving around, it's difficult to get involved in a serious romantic relationship, or heaven forbid, have a kid and jerk them around between different schools. I've had numerous relationships, but have never had a live-in romantic partner or been married.

They also had the "luxury" of not having to relocate to find employment. Homes were more affordable relative to income. At the time, property in our local area appreciated better - today, you're lucky to appreciate above inflation in this part of Tennessee.
You do all that moving around when you're just out of college and can move with the smallest Uhaul truck because you only have the stuff that you had in your dorm room. You move before you are married and certainly before you have kids. You get to a "good place" and THEN when you feel rooted with a decent job and lifestyle you find a relationship and get married.

Hey - there's no women in those small towns anyway! You don't want to live there because there's nothing to do, anyway! So get out, get a good job, and THEN get a life. I don't get why people who hate their hometowns move back there after college and expect things to be great for them. I KNEW while I was in high school that I wouldn't be sticking around.
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Old 07-24-2018, 09:23 AM
Status: "delete" (set 21 days ago)
 
3,189 posts, read 1,274,360 times
Reputation: 2351
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYJoe View Post
Guess you need to find a safe space.
Are you on a different boat?
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Old 07-24-2018, 09:50 AM
 
312 posts, read 201,503 times
Reputation: 261
I agree on the hometown thing. I can be 30minutes or so from home, but home itself doesn't make sense. Unless its San Diego. I'd never leave San Diego if I grew up there / lived there.
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Old 07-24-2018, 11:31 AM
 
6,819 posts, read 4,410,206 times
Reputation: 11941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jobster View Post
Are you on a different boat?
Yes. Possibly on a different ocean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranredd View Post
I agree on the hometown thing...
In "family oriented"/honor-cultures, it is considered to be incumbent to return home, or perhaps to never leave it. This engenders a cultural cycle of self-limitations, which then becomes an economic cycle.

A variant on this, is somebody who does take the initiative to permanently move away, in search of a better job. 20 years pass, and our migrant still hasn't quite put down roots. Then perhaps retirement looks, or maybe job-loss. Then what?
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Old 07-24-2018, 11:47 AM
Status: "delete" (set 21 days ago)
 
3,189 posts, read 1,274,360 times
Reputation: 2351
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Yes. Possibly on a different ocean.



In "family oriented"/honor-cultures, it is considered to be incumbent to return home, or perhaps to never leave it. This engenders a cultural cycle of self-limitations, which then becomes an economic cycle.

A variant on this, is somebody who does take the initiative to permanently move away, in search of a better job. 20 years pass, and our migrant still hasn't quite put down roots. Then perhaps retirement looks, or maybe job-loss. Then what?
Oh, you are too?

You don't live on the planet earth?

Is it complacency or audacity? I don't know.

Last edited by Jobster; 07-24-2018 at 11:56 AM..
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Old 07-24-2018, 11:49 AM
 
752 posts, read 370,649 times
Reputation: 1319
I graduated high school in 1980. Poor area in rural New England. Small class of about 75. About 25% of the class went on to 4 year colleges, almost all of them at the state university , which has never been highly ranked.

Everyone who completed their undergraduate degrees left the area for work opportunities. There was no choice, unless you wanted to become a doctor or lawyer and stay local. That hasnít changed.

All of them found careers without having to pursue additional education, with the exception being the attorneys. That would never happen today, as the 4year college degree at the so-so state university is the new high school diploma. Many of them would not have made it in todayís world.

I personally went to an elite university and had opportunities that the state school grads never would have had. That hasnít changed. What has changed is how much foreign competition there is now for top end jobs. I pretty much only had to compete with other graduates of elite US schools. Now those candidates have to compete with graduates from all over the world. Not to mention that many of those jobs have gone overseas.
Thereís just way more competition.

And then thereís the housing situation. I could afford to buy my first home after getting my first bonus at age 24. I didnít, because I knew I wasnít staying in NYC. Those places I was looking at were about 175k. Now they are ten times that, and I know 24 year olds, or even 30 year olds, are not making 10 times what I was making then.

Itís just harder. I donít know why so many my age refuse to admit that.
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Old 07-24-2018, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,242 posts, read 3,395,295 times
Reputation: 8783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabound1 View Post
I graduated high school in 1980. Poor area in rural New England. Small class of about 75. About 25% of the class went on to 4 year colleges, almost all of them at the state university , which has never been highly ranked.

Everyone who completed their undergraduate degrees left the area for work opportunities. There was no choice, unless you wanted to become a doctor or lawyer and stay local. That hasnít changed.

All of them found careers without having to pursue additional education, with the exception being the attorneys. That would never happen today, as the 4year college degree at the so-so state university is the new high school diploma. Many of them would not have made it in todayís world.

I personally went to an elite university and had opportunities that the state school grads never would have had. That hasnít changed. What has changed is how much foreign competition there is now for top end jobs. I pretty much only had to compete with other graduates of elite US schools. Now those candidates have to compete with graduates from all over the world. Not to mention that many of those jobs have gone overseas.
Thereís just way more competition.

And then thereís the housing situation. I could afford to buy my first home after getting my first bonus at age 24. I didnít, because I knew I wasnít staying in NYC. Those places I was looking at were about 175k. Now they are ten times that, and I know 24 year olds, or even 30 year olds, are not making 10 times what I was making then.

Itís just harder. I donít know why so many my age refuse to admit that.
Or it was artificially easier because the competition pool was less. That's not something I blame older people for. I also don't blame them for the housing situation. It's the market.

I do blame them for the college cost situation.
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Old 07-24-2018, 07:07 PM
 
Location: NYC
11,821 posts, read 7,695,291 times
Reputation: 12814
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Well you can thank your well connected parents if you got a good job through their connection while screwing so many other hard workers and more qualified people. The blame is on the boomer generation that controls much of the management jobs and companies. They control much of the economy with how hiring and salaries should be.

Most traditional companies today have very high levels of people over the ages of 50 running the companies with old ideas. Except for silicon valley but in general older bosses take advantage of millennials.

Blame the boomers when they made huge bets on real estate market and artificially made debts easy to get so people could run up huge debts and crashed the market.

You can blame the boomers that ran companies for setting high employment requirements such as requiring a 4 year degree in a well known college which requires running a $150k+ debt just for an entry job that pays $30k+

Tech companies that are ran by younger management do not have such ridiculous outdated standards as long as you have the skills and motivation.
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