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Old 09-08-2018, 01:57 AM
 
Location: Macon, Georgia
461 posts, read 181,813 times
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Interesting article. Basically could be a motivational career change to some. Feel free dig in.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/07/b...gtype=Homepage
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Old 09-08-2018, 08:05 AM
 
4,713 posts, read 2,251,841 times
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Hah =

Quote:
Over the past year, for example, roughly 68,500 ZipRecruiter postings for administrative assistants attracted over 8.1 million applications, or 118 responses on average for every job. The 136,000 warehouse job listings drew over 9.2 million applications, or 68 per job.

Geography is critical: Lower-wage workers rarely move for a job, so openings in distant places, of course, might not be useful to them. Still, on average, Ms. Pollak wrote in an email, “it is harder (in some sense, at least) to get a job as an administrative assistant, receptionist or warehouse worker than it is to get into Harvard, with its relatively generous 5.2 percent acceptance rate” in 2017.
To say one thing is harder to accomplish than another you need to have a comparable set of candidates trying to achieve it. If you took a 10,000 random American adults and had them apply to Harvard and try to get a admin job the rates of success would favor the admin jobs by a large margin.

She might as well point out that 182 players entered the NBA draft in 2017 and 60 were chosen, therefore playing in the NBA is also easier than getting an admin job since 60 are drafted making for a 33% success rate.
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Old 09-08-2018, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Ohio
17,995 posts, read 13,233,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the tiger View Post
Interesting article. Basically could be a motivational career change to some. Feel free dig in.

Actually, there are 1,465,000 fewer Americans working in August.


That's not unusual, because since year 2000, August has never had job gains, not ever.


The number is a little higher than normal. Usually, you only lose about 500,000 to 1 Million jobs in August.


2011 was an aberration, since only 49,000 jobs were lost in August.


Although 1.465 Million jobs were lost, the number of unemployed Americans actually decreased from 6.7 Million to 6.3 Million.
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Old 09-12-2018, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Houston, texas
14,565 posts, read 10,148,267 times
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Blue-Collar Workers Getting Their Moneyís Worth From Trump For Now.

The media has slaughtered forests of trees and dedicated quintillions of pixels to the question of whether Trump voters will remain loyal to him. The Washington Post provides an answer, or at least some data which suggests one. According to its own analysis and another at the center-left Brookings Institute, blue-collar jobs have expanded at a faster rate than at any time since Ronald Reaganís first term in office.

Blue-collar jobs are growing at their fastest rate in more than 30 years, helping fuel a hiring boom in many small towns and rural areas that are strong supporters of President Trump ahead of Novemberís midterm elections.
Jobs in goods-producing industries ó mining, construction and manufacturing ó grew 3.3 percent in the year preceding July, the best rate since 1984, according to a Washington Post analysis. Ö
Rural employment grew at an annualized rate of 5.1 percent in the first quarter. Smaller metro areas grew 5 percent. Thatís significantly larger than the 4.1 percent growth seen in large urban areas that recovered earlier from the Great Recession, according to an analysis by the Brookings Institutionís Metropolitan Policy Program of a separate set of Labor Department data released Wednesday.
In the past year, the economy has added 656,000 blue-collar jobs, compared with 1.7 million added in the services sector. But the rate of growth in blue-collar jobs is speeding up, while service-sector job growth has hovered around 1.3 percent over the past year.

The media keep hoping that if they say enough bad things about Trump in the TV and radio news, and in the papers, the blue collar voters will turn their backs on Trump despite their doing better economically.. So far it's not working.
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Old 09-16-2018, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
11,919 posts, read 13,245,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soupson1 View Post
Blue-Collar Workers Getting Their Money’s Worth From Trump For Now.

The media has slaughtered forests of trees and dedicated quintillions of pixels to the question of whether Trump voters will remain loyal to him. The Washington Post provides an answer, or at least some data which suggests one. According to its own analysis and another at the center-left Brookings Institute, blue-collar jobs have expanded at a faster rate than at any time since Ronald Reagan’s first term in office.

Blue-collar jobs are growing at their fastest rate in more than 30 years, helping fuel a hiring boom in many small towns and rural areas that are strong supporters of President Trump ahead of November’s midterm elections.
Jobs in goods-producing industries — mining, construction and manufacturing — grew 3.3 percent in the year preceding July, the best rate since 1984, according to a Washington Post analysis. …
Rural employment grew at an annualized rate of 5.1 percent in the first quarter. Smaller metro areas grew 5 percent. That’s significantly larger than the 4.1 percent growth seen in large urban areas that recovered earlier from the Great Recession, according to an analysis by the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program of a separate set of Labor Department data released Wednesday.
In the past year, the economy has added 656,000 blue-collar jobs, compared with 1.7 million added in the services sector. But the rate of growth in blue-collar jobs is speeding up, while service-sector job growth has hovered around 1.3 percent over the past year.

The media keep hoping that if they say enough bad things about Trump in the TV and radio news, and in the papers, the blue collar voters will turn their backs on Trump despite their doing better economically.. So far it's not working.
You make a good point. Main stream media has been rooting against America. Americans have had enough of that self harm formula that has been sending America down the drain.

The rise of blue collar employment is encouraging. It is the surest way to help small town and rural America, which was written off years ago by establishment cronies. Someone is finally going out of their way to help these people. Everyone who is a US citizen, from city dwellers to trailer park trash, deserves a government that works for them equally.
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Old 09-16-2018, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,242 posts, read 3,393,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the tiger View Post
Interesting article. Basically could be a motivational career change to some. Feel free dig in.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/07/b...gtype=Homepage
Admin assistant is a pretty sweet gig. You can make 35-50k a year and probably only need a 2-year degree. It's indoors, out of the elements, cushy. Best part is, it's not service, you are not dealing with customer b.s. all day.

So yeah, I don't doubt those jobs attract more applicants than openings.
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Old 09-17-2018, 09:49 PM
 
18,238 posts, read 11,645,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Admin assistant is a pretty sweet gig. You can make 35-50k a year and probably only need a 2-year degree. It's indoors, out of the elements, cushy. Best part is, it's not service, you are not dealing with customer b.s. all day.

So yeah, I don't doubt those jobs attract more applicants than openings.

Let me help you out with this....


Administrative/sales assistant and receptionist positions vary.


Some places they still resemble same jobs of old, with also equally lower entry requirements. OTOH many companies have downsized/gone lean or whatever and as such have upped their game for assistants and receptionists.


Many places now require those applying to either of the above position to have a four year college degree, along with proven competence in certain software (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, etc....), and so it goes. All this along with other requisite office skills such as ability to deal with people/customers, telephone, typing, etc....


The jobs are also no longer "cushy" for most part either.


Places have skimmed down personnel levels to point most receptionists do more than just answer telephones, direct customer or whatever traffic. Many function as relief and or backup to secretaries/assistants. Meanwhile it is rare for anyone not a CEO or otherwise high on the food chain to get an assistant to themselves. Everyone else shares a girl (or guy) who may work for three, four or more people. In some cases an entire department may have only one administrative assistant.


Quite simply thanks to technology many of the tasks/functions once performed by secretaries/assistants has been digitized and now handled by computers. This had lead to a surplus in many areas of the country of those seeking office support jobs.


Such positions are still highly sought after by females, especially as the NYT piece points out they still resemble what they did in past; low skilled work that a training course and or perhaps a two year college degree is only requirement.
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Old 09-18-2018, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,242 posts, read 3,393,710 times
Reputation: 8783
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Let me help you out with this....


Administrative/sales assistant and receptionist positions vary.


Some places they still resemble same jobs of old, with also equally lower entry requirements. OTOH many companies have downsized/gone lean or whatever and as such have upped their game for assistants and receptionists.


Many places now require those applying to either of the above position to have a four year college degree, along with proven competence in certain software (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, etc....), and so it goes. All this along with other requisite office skills such as ability to deal with people/customers, telephone, typing, etc....


The jobs are also no longer "cushy" for most part either.


Places have skimmed down personnel levels to point most receptionists do more than just answer telephones, direct customer or whatever traffic. Many function as relief and or backup to secretaries/assistants. Meanwhile it is rare for anyone not a CEO or otherwise high on the food chain to get an assistant to themselves. Everyone else shares a girl (or guy) who may work for three, four or more people. In some cases an entire department may have only one administrative assistant.


Quite simply thanks to technology many of the tasks/functions once performed by secretaries/assistants has been digitized and now handled by computers. This had lead to a surplus in many areas of the country of those seeking office support jobs.


Such positions are still highly sought after by females, especially as the NYT piece points out they still resemble what they did in past; low skilled work that a training course and or perhaps a two year college degree is only requirement.

No doubt it's not what it used to be.

Still, what are the better options for someone with those lower middle level of skills?

When I was in retail/restaurant/service hell in the 2000s, I remember watching "The Office" and thinking that a job like those would be so much better than what I had.
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Old 09-18-2018, 01:26 PM
 
18,238 posts, read 11,645,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
No doubt it's not what it used to be.

Still, what are the better options for someone with those lower middle level of skills?

When I was in retail/restaurant/service hell in the 2000s, I remember watching "The Office" and thinking that a job like those would be so much better than what I had.

Well that's it, isn't it? Increasingly the US employment market offers fewer and fewer options for low or even middle level skilled persons. Yes, there are still jobs out there for say mid-level office workers, not many as in past.


In the > thirty five years since films like "Working Girl" and "9-5" showcased the lives of various office workers, corporations and businesses have changed drastically. You simply don't have legions of secretaries, typists, receptionists, data entry, and other middle or even lower level office employees any longer. Worse for some has head counts where reduced to was the need for all those supervisors and or lower/middle management, so those jobs are now have been reduced if not reorganized out of existence as well.
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Old 09-21-2018, 09:32 PM
 
2,621 posts, read 2,023,746 times
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There was an article I read a few years ago. Basically it said that a huge majority of jobs lost during the recession, like 70%, where full time middle class or better wage jobs with benefits, while something like only 20-30% of jobs gained where these type of jobs, and most jobs gained where lower pay, no benefits etc....

It would be interesting to see those statistics today to see if we are making gains towards better jobs or if we are still on the same path.

To the stats, a job is a job, even if it is only an hour every couple weeks at minimum wage. IMO, quality of the job is more important than just quantity.
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