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Old 09-23-2018, 02:43 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 1,351,350 times
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The New York Times did a special section on this, with ten items. Here are some of them.


1. The Recovery Threw the Middle-Class Dream Under a Benz
By Nelson D. Schwartz

Data from the Federal Reserve show that over the last decade and a half, the proportion of family income from wages has dropped from nearly 70 percent to just under 61 percent. Itís an extraordinary shift, driven largely by the investment profits of the very wealthy.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/12/b...al-crisis.html



7. The Banks Changed. Except for All the Ways Theyíre the Same.
By Peter Eavis and Keith Collins.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...odd-frank.html



9. The Next Financial Calamity Is Coming. Hereís What to Watch.
By Matt Phillips and Karl Russell

The global financial crisis is fading into history. But the roots of the next one might already be taking hold.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...al-crisis.html


Very enjoyably, item 10 is simply the big headline: CEOS of Wall Street Sent to Jail.

It's followed by a blank page.
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Old 09-23-2018, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,145 posts, read 15,198,298 times
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The so-called great-recession signals that Fedgov will do whatever is possible to stop any serious and sustained financial-correction that rears its head. The question becomes, are all serious recessions bad and what happens when Fedgov does its best to stifle them?
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Old 09-24-2018, 08:56 AM
 
293 posts, read 155,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
The so-called great-recession signals that Fedgov will do whatever is possible to stop any serious and sustained financial-correction that rears its head. The question becomes, are all serious recessions bad and what happens when Fedgov does its best to stifle them?

Same as what firefighting does to prevent mother nature to take care of her business. Now we have massive wildfires that nobody can control because we preserved all the fuel in the jungles.
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Old 09-24-2018, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Ohio
17,986 posts, read 13,233,625 times
Reputation: 13765
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarallel View Post
The New York Times did a special section on this, with ten items. Here are some of them.


1. The Recovery Threw the Middle-Class Dream Under a Benz
By Nelson D. Schwartz

Data from the Federal Reserve show that over the last decade and a half, the proportion of family income from wages has dropped from nearly 70 percent to just under 61 percent. Itís an extraordinary shift, driven largely by the investment profits of the very wealthy.
There's no relationship between the "investment profits of the very wealthy" and wages.

If I buy 100,000 shares at $106 and sell them at $110, I get $400,000 less Capital Gains Tax, and that in no way has any bearing on wages.


If you're unable to do that, it's because you don't want to, or you don't know how, or you're simply not smart enough and no amount of books, college courses, seminars or Useless Tube videos will ever make you smart enough.


The reason family income has declined is because the number of households with two wage-earners has declined.

This is borne out in both the Employment-to-Population Ratio, and the Labor Force Participation Rate, and for the most part indicates the number of jobs that were permanently lost due to the expansion of Southeast Asia into the 2nd Level Economy.

You'll see it again when India expands into its 2nd Level Economy.

And again when Central Asia expands into its 2nd Level Economy.

And, finally, again when sub-Saharan Africa expands into the 2nd Level Economy.

That, of course, assumes the US doesn't interfere politically, socially, economically or militarily, like it's doing now.

It's not my fault the Lost Generation, GI Generation and Silent Generation chose to rape, pillage and plunder countries, instead of developing them to be future trading partners, which, by the way, is exactly what China is doing.

Of course, had those Generations done that, your wages would only be half of what they are today, and your Standard of Living a lot lower, but at least you would have lots of jobs.

When sub-Saharan Africa moves into its 2nd Level Economy, it will be trading with China and India, because the difference in wages is not so great as it is with the US, so the US will be exporting practically nothing.

Good luck with that.
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Old 09-24-2018, 07:57 PM
 
10,696 posts, read 20,114,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bp25 View Post
Same as what firefighting does to prevent mother nature to take care of her business. Now we have massive wildfires that nobody can control because we preserved all the fuel in the jungles.
Not really. Something like 95% of forest fires are started by man. Not lightening strikes.
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Old 09-24-2018, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Around and about
430 posts, read 266,128 times
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I was better off during the recession.
Rent was cheap as were gas and groceries.
Today, it's a real struggle.
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Old 09-24-2018, 09:32 PM
 
719 posts, read 398,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lluvia View Post
I was better off during the recession.
Rent was cheap as were gas and groceries.
Today, it's a real struggle.
Recessions (and even Depressions, deep recessions) are a part of nature, and not something to be avoided at all cost - they are something to be survived at all cost. In 2001, the BUSINESS CYCLE ended. The FED went into HYPERDRIVE DENIAL - and we know what has happened since then.

The FED Stole trillions of dollar from the future to spend from 2001-2014, to avoid deflation. So we have huge bubbles now, and unsustainably high prices. Of course, if we own a house it is hard to complain - and if we own stocks it is equally hard to complain, Just keep your mouth shut and hope no one notices that everything is out of whack. Of course, unborn Americans will have to pay for the FED's theft of future revenues to spend today - and this happened all over the globe - it is NOT only a US problem. Look at housing prices everywhere. And look at the millions of homeless people globally who were forced out of the market because of all that "stolen" money given to the rich to spend today to save us from our NIGHT TERRORS.

ZIRP has encouraged buying homes as "investment vehicles" and foreigners have poured money into the US into homes as investments. This is a mistake. We need to put our fellow Americans first.

What will CURE this? Higher interest rates. FED UNWINDING has just begun; it still has a long way to go. Before we congratulate the FED on saving us from a Great Recession let's wait until the UNWIND is finished and see where we are. We did a lot of wrong things beginning in 2001. Now we are totaly out of whack.

Good Luck!!!
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Old 09-25-2018, 07:31 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,382 posts, read 50,562,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lluvia View Post
I was better off during the recession.
Rent was cheap as were gas and groceries.
Today, it's a real struggle.
On the other hand, we struggled in the recession but are now far better off than even before the recession. The same for many in our area.



https://statisticalatlas.com/county/...usehold-Income
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Old 09-25-2018, 09:14 AM
 
293 posts, read 155,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
Not really. Something like 95% of forest fires are started by man. Not lightening strikes.
So what? We are still firefighting and not letting nature run its course so that we can preserve the million dollar mansions next to "wooded view". It's just delaying the inevitable.
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Old 09-25-2018, 09:21 AM
 
4,200 posts, read 1,535,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bp25 View Post
Same as what firefighting does to prevent mother nature to take care of her business. Now we have massive wildfires that nobody can control because we preserved all the fuel in the jungles.

You left out the part where man-made climate change dries out the forest, killing millions of trees, allowing bark beetles to infest the forest, which kills millions more. Climate change extends the fire season into November and December out West, which has never happened before.
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