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Old 09-26-2018, 11:59 AM
 
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One of the teachers profiled is being paid over $100,000 per year. Is that really not enough? Even with a rent and a kid that might be enough.

The teacher shown on the cover is paid about $51,000 per year and has to work two other jobs. I think she has med bills and kids. Am I being silly in saying she shouldn't complain if her salary is that much?
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Old 09-26-2018, 12:43 PM
 
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Salary/income is only 1/2 of the equation... COL being the other!

1 side of the equation is useless without the other. $100k in Knoxville TN and you're upper middle class where $100k in SF and you're just barely getting by.
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Old 09-26-2018, 12:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpasa View Post
One of the teachers profiled is being paid over $100,000 per year. Is that really not enough? Even with a rent and a kid that might be enough.
Depends highly on where you live and what the COL is of that region. Typically, areas where teachers can be paid nearly $100K tend to be high COL areas such as NYC, MA, CT, DC, SF, etc. The teachers with lower salaries tend to be in lower COL areas. I believe the teacher with the $50k/year and two other jobs lives in KY
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
321 posts, read 201,412 times
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Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
Salary/income is only 1/2 of the equation... COL being the other!

1 side of the equation is useless without the other. $100k in Knoxville TN and you're upper middle class where $100k in SF and you're just barely getting by.
No matter where you live, if you are a teacher making 100K, you are living high on the hog.
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:20 PM
 
Location: NJ
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teachers are one of those protected jobs where they can always whine about not being paid enough and plenty of people defend them.
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Old 09-27-2018, 08:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpasa View Post
One of the teachers profiled is being paid over $100,000 per year. Is that really not enough? Even with a rent and a kid that might be enough.

The teacher shown on the cover is paid about $51,000 per year and has to work two other jobs. I think she has med bills and kids. Am I being silly in saying she shouldn't complain if her salary is that much?
Why is someone's salary any concern to you? Are you in that class of people who believe they have a "say" in all public salaries simply because you pay taxes, and salaries come out of that public base? I spent the entirety of my working life paying attention to MY salary, and that worked pretty well for me, so, yes, it is being silly to spend any time worrying about what others earn..
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Old 09-27-2018, 08:57 AM
 
Location: NJ
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Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
Why is someone's salary any concern to you? Are you in that class of people who believe they have a "say" in all public salaries simply because you pay taxes, and salaries come out of that public base? I spent the entirety of my working life paying attention to MY salary, and that worked pretty well for me, so, yes, it is being silly to spend any time worrying about what others earn..
i have no interest in fighting over every public employees salaries but it is in all of our interests that compensation for public employees is appropriate for the job. if there is no push back, then all of the pressure will only come from one side. the side that wants more (and that is perfectly fine and understandable).
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Old 09-27-2018, 09:26 AM
 
28,383 posts, read 67,903,744 times
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Default One of these posters gets it, the other not so much???

Quote:
Originally Posted by krug View Post
No matter where you live, if you are a teacher making 100K, you are living high on the hog.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
Salary/income is only 1/2 of the equation... COL being the other!

1 side of the equation is useless without the other. $100k in Knoxville TN and you're upper middle class where $100k in SF and you're just barely getting by.



I spent several years teaching in both private and public schools in a relatively high cost of living area (greater Chicago Metro). Several of my former colleagues are still working, some of have retired, for those who had solid salaries in well funded districts and 100% guaranteed by Illinois Constitution Pensions their financial status is very different than for those whose income and benefits are not as solid.


The funny thing is that I can say that compensation has no real relation to the quality of instruction, the dedication of the individual, the success of their students, or even the reputation of the school. These facts were a big part of why I left the profession.



Few folks understand that many of the best districts to teach in, both as far as compensation and the commitment of students & parents to learning, are the kinds of schools that get so many applicants that one has to be able to work as an aide or substitute teacher at very low compensation / irregular work schedule for an extended period. That too is very dispiriting to folks who may want to get started with their own family...


Good teachers can have a very positive impact on students and ultimately help directly with the overall status of a community and the long term earnings of the aggregate populace.


I also must say those who are unaware of the negative effects of disparaging the good teachers would do well to read articles like the one in Time as well as getting involved in the sometimes controversial aspects of local school accountability. Sadly there are bad teachers, some of which are also overpaid by any measure, fortunately such people are a tiny minority of the pool of all teachers.



The effort that good citizens put into ensuring that there are good schools with well paid staff is a very valuable contribution to their community.
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:36 AM
 
3,699 posts, read 3,025,705 times
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Originally Posted by CaptainNJ View Post
i have no interest in fighting over every public employees salaries but it is in all of our interests that compensation for public employees is appropriate for the job. if there is no push back, then all of the pressure will only come from one side. the side that wants more (and that is perfectly fine and understandable).
I'd think that with all the corruption in government contracting circles, we'd all be better of "pushing back" where it really matters. The salaries of public school teachers has become a political football of sorts, essentially the whipping boy of the government hating anti tax crowd, and just another sideshow of nonsensical wowser distractions. Meanwhile the likes of Boeing, Lockheed Martin, and other public feeding trough gluttons rob us blind. Political distractions don't just pop up as legitimate concerns, no, they are carefully orchestrated for effect, in this case it gives the citizen a "face" to hate.Let's at least try to find some common ground with regard to how we will fry the biggest fish first..
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Old 09-27-2018, 10:38 AM
 
Location: NJ
22,668 posts, read 28,551,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
I'd think that with all the corruption in government contracting circles, we'd all be better of "pushing back" where it really matters. The salaries of public school teachers has become a political football of sorts, essentially the whipping boy of the government hating anti tax crowd, and just another sideshow of nonsensical wowser distractions. Meanwhile the likes of Boeing, Lockheed Martin, and other public feeding trough gluttons rob us blind. Political distractions don't just pop up as legitimate concerns, no, they are carefully orchestrated for effect, in this case it gives the citizen a "face" to hate.Let's at least try to find some common ground with regard to how we will fry the biggest fish first..
i believe public sector pensions and health benefits are breaking state and local budgets. so while it isnt the only place to push back, i do think it is an important place.

for the federal government, the military is a sacred cow that id love to see butchered. but we can tackle more than one thing at a time (and we probably wont be successful with either anyway).
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