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Old Yesterday, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
4,753 posts, read 1,183,860 times
Reputation: 6808

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SAAN View Post
Which alot of them dont have when I have asked them. Hell many dont even have the proper insurance that shows they are doing ride share. I could see if the car was over 5yrs old and paid off, but I see near new off the lot cars doing that service and if its Uber lease they are paying $800 a month.
Why are you worried about the uber driver's car?

Doesn't matter, you don't need a new car to do uber eats, door dash, postmates, etc.

I'm not going to knock someone's hustle unless I'm in their shoes. If it creates some extra cash in their pocket then good for them. Last week I got all my groceries delivered without moving a muscle, thank you Instacart app.
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Old Yesterday, 02:53 AM
 
Location: Northern VA (for now)
23,046 posts, read 32,036,716 times
Reputation: 30483
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAAN View Post
I see so many modern and new cars with a Uber or Lyft sticker on them, and I always ask, is it worth the massive deprecation of putting 20-30k miles a year on a near new car for .60 a mile. Or doing Uber eats for the equivalent of $5 an hour after a days work.





So for a economy that so many brags about is doing well, why are so many resorting to working for near minimum wage and destroying their near new cars for pennies on the dollar. Im guessing something is better than nothing at all, but doesnt seem worth the effort to me.
Iím a driver for Lyft PT. In DC, I gross around $18-25 an hour working some morning rush hours and weekends and Iím not exactly destroying my car. In fact, Iím still averaging 15k miles (average use) per year between driving to my main job and Lyft. Is it something I prefer? No. However, this makes the most sense to put extra cash in my pocket and not have to deal with the drawbacks of a second job. Like having to wear a uniform, being at the mercy of getting vacation time approved for TWO bosses, and not being able to leave at the end of the night if some power hungry retail boss loses their over stuff not being put away (had that happen several times in retail.)
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Old Yesterday, 03:12 AM
 
4,817 posts, read 2,292,786 times
Reputation: 8955
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
I do. I see the other aspects of employment secondary to things as basic as "will this job allow me to pay my bills?" Can't think of many people would would take a $4-per-hour job with a flexible schedule over a $10-an-hour job with a set schedule.
Depends, and it might be $8 versus $10, might be they don't need it to pay their bills, might be the $8/hour is enough to pay the bills.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Make no mistake, I work a desk job with a set schedule and can provide for myself well enough, I just think it's not smart to allow companies who intend to disrupt an industry to do so via sketchy ways to skirt declaring their drivers as employees and providing them avenues to access benefits normally accessible to W2 employees (Not even saying healthcare, just earnings creditable to an unemployment benefit year and eligibility for workers' comp)
They are basically independent contractors, it's nothing new and certainly didn't start with Uber. The last person to give you a haircut was probably one too.

Ironically the people who are in the industry you say they are disrupting (taxi drivers) are usually independent contractors.
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Old Yesterday, 07:10 AM
 
1,245 posts, read 3,604,691 times
Reputation: 851
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
Why do you assume that people aren't nearsighted, and that they understand depreciation, and that they understand the costs of running their vehicle for uber beyond the Gas bill.

Lots of people do things that are really a bad deal long term for short term gratification. It has little to do with the economy.

What about the enough amount of wear and tear on a vehicle especially with the condition of the streets in NYC and Boston ? a vehicle that is being driven 20,000 miles a year will likely need very expensive repairs after the 5th year (the 100,000 rule stands ) and given the idiotic decision of a 5 or 6 year loan for something that may not be drivable past year 5 or 6
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Old Yesterday, 08:24 AM
 
398 posts, read 247,194 times
Reputation: 1471
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
I suppose there are still the uninitiated, who were raised by the uninitiated, and befriended the uninitiated (so on and so forth) who will never learn.

Does this fall under "there's a sucker born every minute..." ?
I think most Uber drivers get dispatched by a smart phone (not sure, don't care). If you can run a smart phone well enough to determine where you should be, at what time, to pick up a stranger, I would think you could find information on working for Uber...

And, yes, a sucker is born every minute.

Good luck, Rg
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Old Yesterday, 08:41 AM
 
9,148 posts, read 3,751,526 times
Reputation: 13478
a smart uber driver would use uber as a seed job for his chauffeur business start up...

get proper license /insurance and make an llc, put the car as a business expense, the drive for uber while you put your company ad on the back of the headrest and hand out a business card after each ride. you could even charge the same as uber and take home more by cutting out the middle man uber. people would use it because they already know you and not risk a stranger with a new uber each time.

the hardest part for small businesses is finding new clients, and uber does that for you...
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Old Yesterday, 08:42 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,504 posts, read 50,828,716 times
Reputation: 28852
Those making money are in big cities where parking is expensive and bus service is oriented toward bring people in from the suburbs, like Seattle. There, surveys show Uber/Lyft drivers averaging $26.09 per hour, with a range of $13.15 to $43.30/hour. It requires a lot of rides in a short distance, and an efficient vehicle. Still, I think they will be unhappily surprised when they do their taxes and see how little they made. I doubt many people can live off of it without another source of income.
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Old Yesterday, 10:38 AM
 
1,847 posts, read 615,395 times
Reputation: 2651
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAAN View Post
I see so many modern and new cars with a Uber or Lyft sticker on them, and I always ask, is it worth the massive deprecation of putting 20-30k miles a year on a near new car for .60 a mile. Or doing Uber eats for the equivalent of $5 an hour after a days work.





So for a economy that so many brags about is doing well, why are so many resorting to working for near minimum wage and destroying their near new cars for pennies on the dollar. Im guessing something is better than nothing at all, but doesnt seem worth the effort to me.



I know two Uber drivers, and they make good money, mostly on tips.
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Old Yesterday, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Vienna, VA
213 posts, read 106,619 times
Reputation: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Those making money are in big cities where parking is expensive and bus service is oriented toward bring people in from the suburbs, like Seattle. There, surveys show Uber/Lyft drivers averaging $26.09 per hour, with a range of $13.15 to $43.30/hour. It requires a lot of rides in a short distance, and an efficient vehicle. Still, I think they will be unhappily surprised when they do their taxes and see how little they made. I doubt many people can live off of it without another source of income.

Yup I usually tip a couple dollars cash each ride too. The surge rates are another way the drivers can make a decent profit. I've had to pay the surge rate quite a few times. Also you have pretty good bonus incentives if you're a starting out.
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Old Yesterday, 12:26 PM
 
1,564 posts, read 349,796 times
Reputation: 1787
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Depends, and it might be $8 versus $10, might be they don't need it to pay their bills, might be the $8/hour is enough to pay the bills.


They are basically independent contractors, it's nothing new and certainly didn't start with Uber. The last person to give you a haircut was probably one too.

Ironically the people who are in the industry you say they are disrupting (taxi drivers) are usually independent contractors.
I see what you're saying. Rideshare drivers own their cars, whereas taxi drivers working for a taxi service, do not, unless they are own the company or are a one-man show.

Does anyone know if conventional taxi drivers (assuming driving a company vehicle, not their own) pay for their own gas?
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