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Old Yesterday, 07:50 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 582,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
What America manufactures, is education, opportunity and entrepreneurs.
LeastPrime, any improvement of a nation’s educational and training systems are reflected by no lesser improvements of their economic and social well-being.

if we don’t significantly increase our per capita GDP, we will be unable to create opportunities for entrepreneurs and confront global warming.

If we don’t confront global warming, there won’t be much remaining economy and too few resources to improve what little of our economy will have remained.

I’m a proponent of the improved trade policy described within Wikipedia’s “Import Certificates” article. Refer to post #10 of this thread.
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Old Yesterday, 07:58 AM
 
65,520 posts, read 66,940,519 times
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they don't pay me enough to solve the worlds ills , nor am i smart enough .

i just play the happy lil moron , and just keep morphing and shifting gears to where i had to be to earn a living .


i started life as an hvac tech since so few did it back in the 1970's and over decades i migrated in to selling and designing control panels for factory automation , pumping stations , sewage treatment plants and robotics .

for 40 years it provided me with a good income and all the work i wanted . since i retired , the field is so lucrative i teach motor controls and variable frequency drives one day a week in retirement because demand in the industry and supporting supply chain business that filling the ranks is hard . for 3-1/2 years i am still training newbees in the field with no end in sight .

if you want to earn decent money do what others can't or won't do for themselves . much of this stuff you can learn on your own or on the job too .

i spent the last 15 years of my final working years as a sales engineer yet i never had a degree . it was simply taking the skills i learned as an hvac tech and just evolving in to related fields as the money shifted by learning on my own .

i much rather be on the side of profiting from factory automation then a factory worker trying to earn a living at it or counting on a job , with what is going on .

Last edited by mathjak107; Yesterday at 08:17 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 08:36 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 582,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Lieqiang, I did not post "US isn't producing many high end products".
I posted, USA is not producing a great many "High-end" TYPES of products for those very same reasons.
I explained further in the prior post. The two sentences do not mean the same thing.
If you’re asserting that USA is currently producing the majority of the world’s non-military aircraft, I doubt that’s true. Previously they produced almost all of the world’s non-military aircraft. USA has lost a good portion of the global market which includes the USA market.

I read that currently, Airbus has more back-orders than Boeing. There are similar stories applicable to most of the industries we’re discussing. The USA is producing a lesser proportion of those industries’ goods being purchased. USA producers are losing ground. The majority of many types of products sold in the USA, such as shoes and electronics, are not made in the USA. We’re losing ground within our own domestic marketplaces.
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Old Yesterday, 08:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
If you’re asserting that USA is currently producing the majority of the world’s non-military aircraft, I doubt that’s true. Previously they produced almost all of the world’s non-military aircraft. USA has lost a good portion of the global market which includes the USA market.
I'm asserting that it's not relevant whether they are #1 or #2 (or #4) it doesn't support your argument that USA doesn't produce many high end products since clearly USA doesn't lack in the production of airplanes which is one of the highest end products. Is Boeing a major world producer of aircraft? Clearly. They are one of the top manufacturers in the world, so yeah it's something high end USA produces.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
I read that currently, Airbus has more back-orders than Boeing. There are similar stories applicable to most of the industries we’re discussing. The USA is producing a lesser proportion of those industries’ goods being purchased. USA producers are losing ground. The majority of many types of products sold in the USA, such as shoes and electronics, are not made in the USA. We’re losing ground within our own domestic marketplaces.
"Losing ground" doesn't mean USA doesn't produce many types of high end products. Majority of shoes isn't relevant either. USA is one of the dominant produces of planes, CPUs, routers, construction equipment, cars, high-tech medical devices, jet engines, etc. but you're going to dismiss all that and say they don't produce many types of high end products because they make a less proportion of shoes?

You said US doesn't produce many high end products, and are now attempting to support that position with various statements that don't. It seems you meant to say that USA is losing ground in production, which is something completely different but now you're so caught up in defending your previous ridiculous assertion you're talking about shoes in an argument about high-end production.
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Old Yesterday, 10:06 AM
 
3,469 posts, read 3,282,781 times
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A few thoughts.

Labor is about 5% of manufacturing costs. In the U.S., the real costs are raw materials, parts, transport, taxation, red tape such as environmental impact statements, fines for polluting, fines for civil rights violations, ADA compliance, gender balancing, liability, lawsuits, energy.

China has no lawsuits, they don't care about the environment, and labor's dirt cheap. It's a manufacturer's dream.

But politics is forcing manufacturers to rethink. "Made in China" is turning radioactive. So, they're moving to Vietnam, Malaysia, & Mexico. And, increasingly, people are finding ways to make a profit in the U.S.

It also doesn't hurt that we have a pro-business government that is cutting taxes and regs. Also, AI and automation keep the labor factor down.

Energy is also a huge factor. Natural gas & oil are dirt cheap in the U.S. these days. Adjusted for inflation, the price of gasoline is where it was in 1972. Natural gas is replacing coal in electric plants. Chemical plants, plastics, glass, etc., are all benefiting.

It's a complex mosaic, but it's clear that manufacturing is generally increasing in the U.S. and probably will continue for some time. Labor is in short supply and wages are rising gradually, limited by robotics and continuing competition from abroad.
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Old Yesterday, 10:11 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 582,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I'm asserting that it's not relevant whether they are #1 or #2 (or #4) it doesn't support your argument that USA doesn't produce many high end products since clearly USA doesn't lack in the production of airplanes which is one of the highest end products. Is Boeing a major world producer of aircraft? Clearly. They are one of the top manufacturers in the world, so yeah it's something high end USA produces.


"Losing ground" doesn't mean USA doesn't produce many types of high end products. Majority of shoes isn't relevant either. USA is one of the dominant produces of planes, CPUs, routers, construction equipment, cars, high-tech medical devices, jet engines, etc. but you're going to dismiss all that and say they don't produce many types of high end products because they make a less proportion of shoes?

You said US doesn't produce many high end products, and are now attempting to support that position with various statements that don't. It seems you meant to say that USA is losing ground in production, which is something completely different but now you're so caught up in defending your previous ridiculous assertion you're talking about shoes in an argument about high-end production.
Lieqiang, within which of the industries you’re discussing, (e.g. CPUs, routers, construction equipment, cars, high-tech medical devices, jet engines, etc), has the USA increased or decreased their proportion of global production? other than sales to government agencies in the USA, have those industries increased or decreased their proportion of sales within USA’s domestic marketplaces? That’s what’s meant by gaining or losing ground.
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Old Yesterday, 11:40 AM
 
2,870 posts, read 1,577,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Lieqiang, within which of the industries you’re discussing, (e.g. CPUs, routers, construction equipment, cars, high-tech medical devices, jet engines, etc), has the USA increased or decreased their proportion of global production? other than sales to government agencies in the USA, have those industries increased or decreased their proportion of sales within USA’s domestic marketplaces? That’s what’s meant by gaining or losing ground.

I personally feel you may have been dropped on your head at some point.
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Old Yesterday, 03:38 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 582,026 times
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BlisterPeanuts, refer to the 10th and 13th posts within this thread. I consider the proposed substantially market driven Import certificate trade policy to be superior to our existing or any other alternative USA trade policy.
Excluding scarce or precious mineral materials integral to any globally traded goods, it treats all goods, and all foreign nations in the same equitable manner. The markets determine what the U.S. imports or exports, but it will not tolerate USA’s great chronic annual trade deficits of goods. It will increase USA’s GDP and numbers of jobs more than otherwise. Annual trade deficits are always net detrimental to their nation’s economies.
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Old Yesterday, 03:43 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 582,026 times
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Damba, I share your disappointment. But there’s no point for you to abuse the respondent that foretold what you would learn from googling.
Among those eminent U.S. industries you referred to, I doubt if any of them has increased their share of the world’s markets, and most, if not all of them have experienced reduced market shares. They’re all striving to retain their shares of U.S. domestic marketplaces and hopefully, they may continue to flourish.
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Old Yesterday, 06:22 PM
 
4,955 posts, read 2,362,934 times
Reputation: 9129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Lieqiang, within which of the industries you’re discussing, (e.g. CPUs, routers, construction equipment, cars, high-tech medical devices, jet engines, etc), has the USA increased or decreased their proportion of global production? other than sales to government agencies in the USA, have those industries increased or decreased their proportion of sales within USA’s domestic marketplaces? That’s what’s meant by gaining or losing ground.
I understand what losing ground is, but what I'm not understanding is why you think losing ground is equivalent to not being a major producer in an industry. You're doing your best to completely change the direction of this discussion, which was engaged when you made this statement:

"USA is not producing a great many "High-end" types of products"

I'm amazed that you can't wrap your head around the difference between a country not producing something and a country losing ground in the global market. The latter doesn't prove the former. If Intel has lost global market share of CPUs but is still the #1 producer in the world, had revenue of 63 billion in 2017, and produces most of their product in USA where they employ 100k, it means USA still produces CPUs regardless of whether their market share is 72% or 70%. Intel losing ground slightly doesn't mean USA doesn't produce CPUs anymore, and it doesn't support this nonsense you were spouting that USA doesn't produce a great many high end products.
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