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Old 11-30-2018, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Thailand
5,270 posts, read 2,512,220 times
Reputation: 9735

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Quote:
Originally Posted by damba View Post
I personally feel you may have been dropped on your head at some point.
He's maintaining a hilarious (and sad) logical disconnect.

Apparently if I used to sell 100 apples per day but due to the new orchard down the street I now only sell 80 apples per day, I no longer sell apples.
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Old 12-01-2018, 06:46 AM
 
1,209 posts, read 620,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
... I'm amazed that you can't wrap your head around the difference between a country not producing something and a country losing ground in the global market. The latter doesn't prove the former. If Intel has lost global market share of CPUs but is still the #1 producer in the world, had revenue of 63 billion in 2017, and produces most of their product in USA where they employ 100k, it means USA still produces CPUs regardless of whether their market share is 72% or 70%. Intel losing ground slightly doesn't mean USA doesn't produce CPUs anymore, and it doesn't support this nonsense you were spouting that USA doesn't produce a great many high end products.
Lieqiang, I‘m opposed to USA’s chronically annual trade deficits of goods. Trade deficits are always net detrimental to their nation’s GDP and drag upon their numbers of jobs.

The too few eminent USA industries that sparkle on the fabric of our nation’s economy, are WANING. As the years pass, they’re outputs are lesser proportions of world’s production of similar goods and in some cases lesser proportions of sales within our own domestic marketplace.

[They are behaving similarly to other previously great USA industries that are now shadows of their previous production volumes; (e.g. USA’s shoes, brass, steel, shipping, and clothing industries)].

That’s why I’m an advocate of USA adopting a unilateral trade policy sensitive and automatically self-adjusting to markets; (a trade policy not dependent upon ad hoc political negotiations).

I’m specifically a proponent of the improved concept described in Wikipedia’s article, “Import Certificates”. The unilateral policy doesn’t discriminate among enterprises, or industries or foreign nations; it’s intolerant of its nation experiencing great annual trade deficits of goods; while simultainiously increasing its nation’s GDP and bolstering their numbers of jobs more than otherwise.
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Old 12-01-2018, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Thailand
5,270 posts, read 2,512,220 times
Reputation: 9735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Lieqiang, I‘m opposed to USA’s chronically annual trade deficits of goods. Trade deficits are always net detrimental to their nation’s GDP and drag upon their numbers of jobs.

The too few eminent USA industries that sparkle on the fabric of our nation’s economy, are WANING. As the years pass, they’re outputs are lesser proportions of world’s production of similar goods and in some cases lesser proportions of sales within our own domestic marketplace.

[They are behaving similarly to other previously great USA industries that are now shadows of their previous production volumes; (e.g. USA’s shoes, brass, steel, shipping, and clothing industries)].

That’s why I’m an advocate of USA adopting a unilateral trade policy sensitive and automatically self-adjusting to markets; (a trade policy not dependent upon ad hoc political negotiations).

I’m specifically a proponent of the improved concept described in Wikipedia’s article, “Import Certificates”. The unilateral policy doesn’t discriminate among enterprises, or industries or foreign nations; it’s intolerant of its nation experiencing great annual trade deficits of goods; while simultainiously increasing its nation’s GDP and bolstering their numbers of jobs more than otherwise.
Your opposition of trade deficits does not support your claim that USA doesn't produce many types of high end products. Lesser proportion of world production does not support your claim that USA doesn't produce many types of high end products. What you advocate on trade policies does not support your claim that USA doesn't produce many types of high end products.

Again... I'm here disputing what you said about USA and high end products. You suddenly arguing everything else you can think of with any tangible relation to the subject doesn't change that what you said was false.

Does USA produce many types of high end produces? Yes. Absolutely.
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Old 12-01-2018, 09:12 AM
 
1,209 posts, read 620,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Your opposition of trade deficits does not support your claim that USA doesn't produce many types of high end products. Lesser proportion of world production does not support your claim that USA doesn't produce many types of high end products. What you advocate on trade policies does not support your claim that USA doesn't produce many types of high end products.

Again... I'm here disputing what you said about USA and high end products. You suddenly arguing everything else you can think of with any tangible relation to the subject doesn't change that what you said was false.

Does USA produce many types of high end produces? Yes. Absolutely.
Lieqiang, my forte is not semantics and I have no intention of continuing to discuss how you (or anyone) interprets my words. If my wording's correct or wrong, then they were what they were and I cannot undo them. I'd be pleased to continue discussing economics.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Lieqiang, I‘m opposed to USA’s chronically annual trade deficits of goods. Trade deficits are always net detrimental to their nation’s GDP and drag upon their numbers of jobs.

The too few eminent USA goods producing industries that actually sparkle on the fabric of our nation’s economy, are WANING. As the years pass, they’re outputs are lesser proportions of world’s production of similar goods and in some cases lesser proportions of sales within our own domestic marketplace.

[They are behaving similarly to other previously great USA industries that are now shadows of their previous production volumes; (e.g. USA’s shoes, brass, steel, shipping, and clothing industries)].

That’s why I’m an advocate of USA adopting a unilateral trade policy sensitive and automatically self-adjusting to markets; (a trade policy not dependent upon ad hoc political negotiations).
I’m specifically a proponent of the improved concept described in Wikipedia’s article, “Import Certificates”. ...
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Old 12-01-2018, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Thailand
5,270 posts, read 2,512,220 times
Reputation: 9735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Lieqiang, my forte is not semantics and I have no intention of continuing to discuss how you (or anyone) interprets my words.
Your exact words were: USA is not producing a great many "High-end" types of products

It's not a matter of interpretation, it's a matter of being false. You've been throwing every smoke grenade in the bag trying to prove different things and pretending they somehow reflect truth onto this statement. You're laser fixated on Boeing having a lesser share of the world's aircraft market than a few decades ago, but what matters for American GDP/employment is this:



It isn't a zero sum game where other countries starting to manufacture more airplanes to fill the rapidly growing global demand means Boeing is somehow no longer a high revenue manufacturer of high end products that makes a huge impact on USA manufacturing output.
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Old 12-30-2018, 07:36 PM
 
8,634 posts, read 7,626,665 times
Reputation: 18711
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsmith5a View Post
i think they could make these low end products but they just aren't making them because people are lazy. they just want to import products from china and sell them. we need to make them right here in the usa. i know they can make these things profitably. they don't have to be original or high tech. we can make fans and little plastic widgets like they do in china. we need more factory startups and less website startups.
We do not make them here in this country for one reason. If we made them here, the product has to compete in the market place, and when it can be made in another country and sell here for less than it can be made here, no one wants to run a factory and be unable to sell their product. We sell a lot of higher priced goods overseas, and that is where we excel.
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Old 01-02-2019, 02:55 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,252 posts, read 38,260,282 times
Reputation: 21542
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
We do not make them here in this country for one reason. If we made them here, the product has to compete in the market place, and when it can be made in another country and sell here for less than it can be made here, no one wants to run a factory and be unable to sell their product. We sell a lot of higher priced goods overseas, and that is where we excel.
along these lines... cost of owning a factory in USA...
The business taxation in USA has undergone tremendous barriers to owning a factory in USA,

MUCH better to own your factory in a country that appreciates and encourages the production of capital goods and equipment. Even within the USA, it is over 2x as expensive to own your factory in your home state if a neighboring state 5 minutes away does not levy a personal property / asset tax on your capital investment needed to keep the joint running. (Yes my state taxes you on everything including paperclips and staples and wastebaskets). Other states and other nations offer perks for factory owners in the name of employment and revenue creation.

The personal taxes on my factory equip is over $100k / yr in USA, a friend with a nearly identical factory overseas gets $250k per yr in 'investment credits' often as grants (CASH from the gov) to create jobs. I cannot compete with his factory output. (He has NEW equip, I have OLD equip, very old!, new would = 4x the ownership tax).
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Old 01-02-2019, 03:04 PM
 
10,000 posts, read 7,730,193 times
Reputation: 24483
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
along these lines... cost of owning a factory in USA...
The business taxation in USA has undergone tremendous barriers to owning a factory in USA,

MUCH better to own your factory in a country that appreciates and encourages the production of capital goods and equipment. Even within the USA, it is over 2x as expensive to own your factory in your home state if a neighboring state 5 minutes away does not levy a personal property / asset tax on your capital investment needed to keep the joint running. (Yes my state taxes you on everything including paperclips and staples and wastebaskets). Other states and other nations offer perks for factory owners in the name of employment and revenue creation.

The personal taxes on my factory equip is over $100k / yr in USA, a friend with a nearly identical factory overseas gets $250k per yr in 'investment credits' often as grants (CASH from the gov) to create jobs. I cannot compete with his factory output. (He has NEW equip, I have OLD equip, very old!, new would = 4x the ownership tax).
What about tax deductions for business expenses? Why are you paying personal taxes on business equipment? Are you a legally registered business?
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:43 PM
 
1,209 posts, read 620,983 times
Reputation: 344
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Your exact words were: USA is not producing a great many "High-end" types of products

It's not a matter of interpretation, it's a matter of being false. You've been throwing every smoke grenade in the bag trying to prove different things and pretending they somehow reflect truth onto this statement. You're laser fixated on Boeing having a lesser share of the world's aircraft market than a few decades ago, but what matters for American GDP/employment is this:



It isn't a zero sum game where other countries starting to manufacture more airplanes to fill the rapidly growing global demand means Boeing is somehow no longer a high revenue manufacturer of high end products that makes a huge impact on USA manufacturing output.
Lieqiang, USA products' shares of global, (including USA domestic) marketplaces are proportionally reducing).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
James Bond 007, Refer to:
https://www.stlouisfed.org/on-the-ec...ally-declining

I disagree with the writer's contending “nominal GDP for the entire (USA) economy has outgrown manufacturing contributions to our GDP largely because aggregate product prices have increased faster than manufactured products' prices.
A negative balance of international trade , (a trade deficit) indicates the nation purchased more and produced less.

Regardless if we, along with the remainder of the world may be purchasing lesser proportions of goods rather than service products, USA's chronic great annual trade deficits are due to the increased imports proportional to our exports rather than proportional differences between manufacturing and all remaining products' price changes.

The consequences of of the nation's annual trade deficit for any classification of products is to reduce (more than otherwise), that classification of products' contributions to their nation's GDP.
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Old 01-11-2019, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Thailand
5,270 posts, read 2,512,220 times
Reputation: 9735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Lieqiang, USA products' shares of global, (including USA domestic) marketplaces are proportionally reducing).
You said: "USA is not producing a great many "High-end" types of products"

I'm not sure if it's funny or sad that you think pointing on a reduction in global share somehow validates that statement. Reduction in global share doesn't mean USA is producing less of something, and it certainly doesn't mean they aren't producing many of something. That is what you claimed, as seen in quote above. It is false no matter how many liberties one wishes to take with "great many" since USA is still a world leader in production of high end type products.
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