U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-24-2018, 06:49 PM
 
5,566 posts, read 5,763,420 times
Reputation: 2487

Advertisements

Is manufacturing in US making a comeback, if so where?

I have read in other forums it is, and in fact still lots of manufacturing never left. Especially in the high tech sector. So what high tech stuff do we actually make here, and not just design?

Is the Rust Belt making a comeback?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-24-2018, 11:30 PM
 
4,943 posts, read 2,360,184 times
Reputation: 9121
Manufacturing has been fine, what dropped was manufacturing employment. In USA buying a machine that stamps out 500 widgets per hour is a much better deal than paying 10 people to stamp out 50 widgets per hour. In some developing country the equation might be different since the widget makes are making 1/6 as much so manufacturing employment remains higher, especially for low-tech products like plastic spatulas and shirts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 05:04 AM
 
65,467 posts, read 66,912,679 times
Reputation: 43822
for many companies the words "manufacturing here " can mean different thing .

i worked for a company that at one time made their own line of commercial and industrial water and sewage pumps here totally . .

our competition was manufacturing off shore and it reached a point we were just not competitive and could not win bids at margins that would have allowed the business to survive .

so we turned to manufacturing the pump castings overseas , but doing all assembly , quality control ,engineering ,sales , etc right here . that was what it took to become a major player

well that enabled the company to grow from an 8 million dollar company with 8 employees to 100 million last year . it employs over 350 Americans in 5 states . it has seen the suppliers we dealt with and vendors of all types grow by leaps and bounds so that growth went right through the supply chain and support companies they use .

so the castings are still made over seas in a state of the art Chinese cnc equipped factory but like car manufacturers do , the manufacturing here really amounts to assembly .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 09:58 AM
 
5,566 posts, read 5,763,420 times
Reputation: 2487
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
for many companies the words "manufacturing here " can mean different thing .

i worked for a company that at one time made their own line of commercial and industrial water and sewage pumps here totally . .

our competition was manufacturing off shore and it reached a point we were just not competitive and could not win bids at margins that would have allowed the business to survive .

so we turned to manufacturing the pump castings overseas , but doing all assembly , quality control ,engineering ,sales , etc right here . that was what it took to become a major player

well that enabled the company to grow from an 8 million dollar company with 8 employees to 100 million last year . it employs over 350 Americans in 5 states . it has seen the suppliers we dealt with and vendors of all types grow by leaps and bounds so that growth went right through the supply chain and support companies they use .

so the castings are still made over seas in a state of the art Chinese cnc equipped factory but like car manufacturers do , the manufacturing here really amounts to assembly .
Then why so expensive to make the castings domestically?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 04:52 PM
 
103 posts, read 48,330 times
Reputation: 303
i work at a manufacturing job. i've never seen many factory jobs leave, but i've seen lots of workers leave their factory jobs. we have a lot of people stay on the job for about two days and then quit. we see lots of that stuff. sure, there are a few factories that have closed but not many. i don't think we have lost many factory jobs. this is just nonsense from the media.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 04:56 PM
 
103 posts, read 48,330 times
Reputation: 303
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Manufacturing has been fine, what dropped was manufacturing employment. In USA buying a machine that stamps out 500 widgets per hour is a much better deal than paying 10 people to stamp out 50 widgets per hour. In some developing country the equation might be different since the widget makes are making 1/6 as much so manufacturing employment remains higher, especially for low-tech products like plastic spatulas and shirts.

i think they could make these low end products but they just aren't making them because people are lazy. they just want to import products from china and sell them. we need to make them right here in the usa. i know they can make these things profitably. they don't have to be original or high tech. we can make fans and little plastic widgets like they do in china. we need more factory startups and less website startups.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 05:02 PM
 
4,122 posts, read 2,012,258 times
Reputation: 5332
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsmith5a View Post
i think they could make these low end products but they just aren't making them because people are lazy. they just want to import products from china and sell them. we need to make them right here in the usa. i know they can make these things profitably. they don't have to be original or high tech. we can make fans and little plastic widgets like they do in china. we need more factory startups and less website startups.

It's economics. We don't have the cost base and now we no longer have the supply chain. We still do make many things in the USA but major production - as in the garment industry, is never coming back to the US unless you can somehow reverse globalization, which is probably impossible and even if you did succeed it would not be a good idea because it would require raising many prices to the consumer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2018, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
6,008 posts, read 1,799,249 times
Reputation: 5005
I did a thread sort-of on this topic last year:
Is U.S. Manufacturing Really Declining?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2018, 03:38 AM
 
65,467 posts, read 66,912,679 times
Reputation: 43822
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Then why so expensive to make the castings domestically?
labor , utility costs and mostly epa regulations on some of the processes like vpi impregnation of motor winding's . the air filtering systems that are required are much to costly and are really not needed .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2018, 09:29 AM
 
1,090 posts, read 580,673 times
Reputation: 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Manufacturing has been fine, what dropped was manufacturing employment. In USA buying a machine that stamps out 500 widgets per hour is a much better deal than paying 10 people to stamp out 50 widgets per hour. In some developing country the equation might be different since the widget makes are making 1/6 as much so manufacturing employment remains higher, especially for low-tech products like plastic spatulas and shirts.
Lieqiang, manufacturing in the USA is not “fine”. Much lesser than previous volumes of all types of goods are no longer produced in the USA, but we are purchasing greater volumes of those same finished goods. Many particular goods sold in the USA are effectively entirely produced beyond our borders. We’re purchasing more of those goods but their producers are no longer within our borders.

The foreign producers employ foreign workers. They use foreign materials. their production facilities are built by foreign construction companies. Their facilities and production line mechanisms are maintained by foreign enterprises. those foreign industries employ plumbers, carpenters, accountants, lawyers, janitors, poster designers, supervisors, cafeteria workers, human resource departments.

When a USA company relocates their production overseas, their production support is foreign support. The loss of sales volumes experienced by a USA tool and die company cuts their production volumes and that increases their remaining productions’ costs per item; which in turn causes other of their clients to relocate their production beyond USA’s borders. This progresses until USA’s tool and die industry is a shadow of what it was previously.

Those factories that consumed electric power and crowded our highways with trucks carrying their production supporting goods, also shared and reduced the overheads and costs per mile of our electricity transmission, highways, tunnels, bridges, railroad tracks, and interstate water routes; and of course, they contributed something to our governments’ tax revenues.
They provided jobs for the graduates of our colleges. They supported research and development within their own enterprises. our colleges and university laboratories. When you produce, you gain the knowledge and experience from manipulating the materials, tools and managing the people involved with that production.

Regardless of the types of goods being produced, (e.g. agricultural, ranching, fishing. mining, lumber, text-books, medical devices, locomotives or mop handles), the benefits of production are earned by those who produce.
There’s no economic difference between foreign or domestic vehicles on USA highways or in USA repair shops. Their entire economic differences occurred prior to their reaching their USA assembly lines' shipment platforms, or when the imports reached the jurisdiction of the U.S. governments, and enterprises, and were handled by USA labor.

Consider all of this and more the next time you hear an idiot spout that producing any kind of goods is unimportant because their production is automated and requires much fewer workers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top