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Old 12-19-2018, 04:02 PM
 
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GDP per capita (2017) = $59,792
Income per capita (2017) = $31,177

"per capita" means average. It doesn't mean median nor household.

Why are these 2 figures different by 48%?

sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...al)_per_capita
https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fa...e/US/SEX255217
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Old 12-19-2018, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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What makes you think GDP translates directly to income?

Start with this: does "per capita income" include those corporation-persons?
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Old 12-20-2018, 03:02 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
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it means some gross national calculation divided by the population.
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Old 12-20-2018, 08:56 AM
 
1,131 posts, read 597,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acegolfer View Post
GDP per capita (2017) = $59,792
Income per capita (2017) = $31,177
"per capita" means average. It doesn't mean median nor household.
Why are these 2 figures different by 48%?
sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...al)_per_capita
https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fa...e/US/SEX255217
AceGolfer, GDP represents the aggregate of all FINAL, (i.e. not intermediate) goods and service products. Transfers of wealth are not production of additional goods or services and they are not included within calculations of GDP.

The production or remodeling of a building contribute to increased production of goods and service products. Even the real-estate broker fees are payments for service products. The profit or loss due the the transfer of the house's deed, (i.e. the certificate of ownership) was not an increase of goods or service products. That's simply transfers of wealth. The insurance broker's fee is a service product. But the insurance companies' revenues from sales of policies, and their payouts for casualty losses are transfers of wealth and do not contribute to the nation's GDP. Losing bets and winner's gains on insurance, horse-racing, or the stock and bond exchanges, are all transfers of wealth.

The liquidity of finances provided by the NY stock exchange is of some economic benefit to the nation, but the exchange's PR implying their exchanges are "investing in America" is B.S. Only if your purchase of a share of a goods or product producing enterprise, (rather than a financial enterprises that are essentially financial funds) provided capital improvement to that goods or product producing enterprise, did you actually invest into that enterprise. Almost the entire transactions of the NY stock exchange are transfers of wealth and other than their brokerage fees and they didn't contribute a penny to their nation's GDP. Purchase of an enterprise's debts is never an investment into the enterprise; it's a bet that the enterprise will eventually pay that debt).
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Old 12-20-2018, 09:05 AM
 
11,969 posts, read 6,201,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
it means some gross national calculation divided by the population.
So itís counting all the people who donít work. Dependent minors. College students. Disabled people. Stay-at-home spouses. ...

The BLS says the median wage is $44,564. That is a more useful number.
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:45 PM
 
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AceGolfer, if we added the value of ford's annual 6.6 million vehicles produced;
subtracted their materials and other costs, the Ford Motor Corporation's payments for wages, salaries, sales commissions contributed to USA's aggregate individuals' incomes are less than the company's net contribution to our nation's GDP.

This is also the case for each enterprise that provides materials, products, or services to the Ford Motor Corporation. Why would you suppose that the nation's aggregate production of goods and services, (i.e. our GDP) would not be greater than the incomes of individuals that participated or profited from those productions?

Our nation's GDP and our aggegrate incomes are two different things.
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Old 12-21-2018, 10:59 AM
 
8,439 posts, read 3,584,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acegolfer View Post
GDP per capita (2017) = $59,792
Income per capita (2017) = $31,177

"per capita" means average. It doesn't mean median nor household.

Why are these 2 figures different by 48%?

sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...al)_per_capita
https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fa...e/US/SEX255217
It also reflects the fact that personal income does not keep up with productivity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:U...old_income.png
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Old 12-21-2018, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,060 posts, read 1,367,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
It also reflects the fact that personal income does not keep up with productivity.
Perhaps. But consider that to argue it should is pretty s*c**l*st.
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Old 12-21-2018, 12:33 PM
 
1,131 posts, read 597,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
It also reflects the fact that personal income does not keep up with productivity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:U...old_income.png
HooNose, you're certainly correct. The CPI does not keep pace with the GDP and the extent that it doesn't do so is detrimental to our median wage, middle-income segment of our population, and drags upon our entire economy.
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Old 12-21-2018, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,060 posts, read 1,367,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
HooNose, you're certainly correct. The CPI does not keep pace with the GDP and the extent that it doesn't do so is detrimental to our median wage, middle-income segment of our population, and drags upon our entire economy.
I'm having trouble parsing this. You're saying that because consumer costs don't go up as fast as the GDP, it's detrimental to our middle-wage economy?
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